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-   -   walking on beams and joist (https://www.contractortalk.com/f3/walking-beams-joist-194089/)

415frisco 05-07-2015 11:05 PM

walking on beams and joist
 
Im a first period apprentice carpenter out of sf. do you have any tips on walking on the joist/beams?

VinylHanger 05-07-2015 11:07 PM

23 Attachment(s)
Don't fall.

Rio 05-07-2015 11:15 PM

Make sure they're attached as in fastened.

griz 05-07-2015 11:17 PM

Yea, don't....

fast way to get fired and an OSHA ticket....

read here:

http://www.contractortalk.com/f14/walking-plate-193169/

Railman 05-07-2015 11:18 PM

Walk softly, & bend knees.

thehockeydman 05-08-2015 12:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by griz (Post 2962785)
Yea, don't....

fast way to get fired and an OSHA ticket....

read here:

http://www.contractortalk.com/f14/walking-plate-193169/

There isn't a single crew around here that doesn't walk on joists. I can't imagine framing a floor without doing so. How else would you install blocking between i Joists?

To the OP. You gotta trust your feet. Ever play that game when you were a kid where you only walk on the cracks in the sidewalk? That requires more precision than walking 16 OC joists. Your body knows how to to walk the joists, your brain is psyching you out.

Get used to feeling the joists underneath your feet. When walking perpendicular to the joists, I like to step on them with the balls of my feet (the part right before your toes). And keep a nice steady rhythm. It looks stupid and sketchy as hell when you see a guy wobbling on a joists and jumping one foot to the next joist as fast as he can as he struggles to keep his balance, all because he thinks he's going to fall. They're 16 OC. Even if you fall, it be pretty impressive to slip between the joists and fall right through the floor. Still, don't fall.

We had a new guy a while back who was terrified of walking on joists. He figured it out soon enough. If it's truly something you can't bring yourself to do, perhaps framing isn't for you.

thehockeydman 05-08-2015 12:10 AM

One bonus tip:

If you're clipping an air tool on to your belt while moving around, make sure you have plenty of slack. Walking on joists than being yanked backwards as your hose goes tight is a lousy feeling :mad:

Calidecks 05-08-2015 12:56 AM

1 Attachment(s)
If you ever get a disoriented feeling, stop and look off into the distance for a second. Helps me get my bearing again.

kwunch 05-08-2015 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thehockeydman (Post 2963201)
There isn't a single crew around here that doesn't walk on joists. I can't imagine framing a floor without doing so. How else would you install blocking between i Joists?

This.

I know my buddy said he had a really hard time not walking on joists when they were doing a big commercial job, but as soon as they were back to firing out houses everyone was back on the joists.

It's not as bad as you think it is, just move carefully and deliberately, you'll have it down in no time. It always feels sketchy to me now, but I haven't framed in awhile and I guess it keeps me from being too comfortable/getting too cocky when I do have to walk them.

Easy Gibson 05-08-2015 09:07 AM

Only time it's sketchy to me is in remodeling work.

This morning I was checking out a site that was midway through having the subfloor ripped and replaced. Boards were up but the nails were still in. Everything has 100 years of grime on it so it's hard to see the nails. Watch out for those.

hockey has it right that your feet already know what to do, but your brain is messing with you. Same for walking on a roof or a ridge. You could probably walk a mile balancing on a railroad track and think nothing of it, but if you put it 10 feet off the ground it's something else entirely. Eyes on the horizon!

Texas Wax 05-08-2015 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Easy Gibson (Post 2964010)
Only time it's sketchy to me is in remodeling work.

A bit more at stake there. Like the time we had a guy step off a joist in bathroom remodel. Right through a panel in a tray ceiling. 100 year old plaster with linen covering. A quick $1100 ooops. And a good laugh to offset that. 'Dorf' does remodeling. Luckily for him, the Dude had a little "offset" of the goods when he went down to the inseam of his jeans.

Or when the new guy fell all the way through and landed, doggy style, on a family heirloom coffee table. Butt clencher waiting for the fallout on that one. Fortunately the home owners we very cool about it. First and ongoing concern, by them, was that nobody was hurt. The table can be fixed people not so much.

kiteman 05-08-2015 11:33 AM

I remember my first boss saying "You're not getting paid to be brave"

C2projects 05-08-2015 01:12 PM

Why are you sleeping on them in the first place?

Warren 05-08-2015 03:35 PM

Take your time, look where your foot is gonna be, and do it with confidence. Losing confidence will put you down really fast.

Spencer 05-08-2015 04:50 PM

My sister in law had a bad wreck a month and a half ago. I stayed at the hospital a couple nights. There was a menonite lady there that I met. Her husband fell framing up some kind of barn. Landed on his feet on concrete. Shattered ankles...exploded vertebrae...his days of manual labor are over. Be careful. Never become overconfident, that's the second your life can change.

Calidecks 05-08-2015 04:55 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by kiteman (Post 2964546)
I remember my first boss saying "You're not getting paid to be brave"

I remember having to go up many feet to the top of a gymnasium and straighten rebar sticking out the tops of the block walls they just poured. I was pretty scared as an 18 year old. My boss told me I can either get up there and straighten them or go home. I went up there and straightened them.

Warren 05-08-2015 05:17 PM

I never force it with new guys. I have known some guys who just have a natural knack of doing it. I am not one of those. My old boss was one of those guys. He would go months without doing any framing, show up on site and hop right up there. He could actually jump up, grab the plate, and pull himself up onto the wall. I think I recall one time that he walked off the end plate, realized his mistake, and just calmly hovered around and walked back on. At least that's how I remembered it.

C2projects 05-08-2015 06:05 PM

Walking on joists is much easier than walking on walls, you have to commit though with every step. The second you doubt yourself is when things can go wrong.

There are days where I feel I can pretty much run across plates. And other days I can barely take the first step. Usually though after that first step it becomes a whole lot easier.

I never have a problem walking across joists. Make sure you're 100% positive they have been nailed down to foundation at the very least. But its better to wait till rimboard is on. You forget to do this you'll be on the way to the floor below whether you like it or not.

Deckhead 05-08-2015 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Warren (Post 2965378)
I never force it with new guys. I have known some guys who just have a natural knack of doing it. I am not one of those. My old boss was one of those guys. He would go months without doing any framing, show up on site and hop right up there. He could actually jump up, grab the plate, and pull himself up onto the wall. I think I recall one time that he walked off the end plate, realized his mistake, and just calmly hovered around and walked back on. At least that's how I remembered it.

Your a good man. I learned from a guy who was a forcer. Turned out I was really good at it. Just helped him frame a job a week ago, he laughed and said how I was originally scared to walk 2x6 walls and now I scare him when I walk them.

Set your mind to it, you know you are capable of keeping your feet within 6" so you just walk. Bending over is the harder part. People say dont look down but you'll lose balance if you look up. Focus on the place you should be walking and not where youre walking, your body will take you there.

Inner10 05-09-2015 08:02 AM

Don't throw a loose 4 foot piece of 2x12 not nailed down across a few joists to step on...you will step on the end and fall straight into the basement like I did.


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