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Who Has Cold Yet?

 
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Old 11-21-2016, 12:58 PM   #41
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


I heated with wood for years. Keeps the house toasty warm and the little woman likes it around 75 degrees, so we often had to open the windows to cool it down even with no insulation in the house. From CL we grabbed a Quadrafire 4100 with stainless flue liner for FREE. The stove is fully EPA approved and one of the cleanest burning out there. It had been used maybe 2-4 times previously. New the stoves were over $4,000, but the lady didn't want to deal with wood and wanted a gas stove. With unlimited oak and other woods around I spent years trying to safely burn the forest I cleaned up and cut down in our fireplace. Between carrying wood in, which brings too many spiders in, having to start the fire, clean the ashes (Rarely), clean the flue, constantly cleaning the dang floor, having rats living in the wood pile, having giant wood piles in a severe fire zone, carry wood up and down steep slopes, splitting the wood with a splitter for 6 grueling hours at a time, listening to the fans blowing 24/7, I was glad after a year of no forced air heat to finally have a gas heater controlled by a Nest working again. Go riddance! I gave away 6 cords of good wood for free before this past summers fire season. With the top plates sealed, R60 in the attic, and double pane windows the house stays warm enough.

For cold days I absolutely love my Makita heated jacket. I get hours of heat from a 2.0ah battery, but I do consider the vest/jacket fragile. As a single layer jacket I find it good down to freezing temps. So far that is all I have had to experience.
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Old 11-21-2016, 03:00 PM   #42
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Sat morning I awoke to 3 degrees, warmed up to 45, yesterday morning a bit warmer at about 25, it got really hot yesterday to about 60, this morning snow and 28,

Heat, electric with wood to kick up temps when needed
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Old 11-21-2016, 04:48 PM   #43
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


About -4C here.

Bonus: I also have a cold.
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Old 11-21-2016, 04:57 PM   #44
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


well we had in the 60's on Sat and then it cooled off Sunday.
Woke up this morning with a blanket of show.

I drove towards Sysracuse this afternon and they already had 12"s on the ground.

I guess winter has started.....
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Old 11-21-2016, 06:24 PM   #45
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Heading to Alaska Monday. I've gotten soft, it will be cold.
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Old 11-21-2016, 06:44 PM   #46
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


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I will have to do the labor anyway for the pit and fireplace outside. Plus several acres of intense tree clearing...... Plus I like the burn chit

And she wants an electric FP in the entertainment center.
Not sure if it is the same but a electric fireplace will lower your home owners insurance over the real deal here in NY. Not sure if the same where you are at, but saves you some coin.

I am in up state NY, not the city. finger lakes region.
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Old 11-21-2016, 06:47 PM   #47
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


No cold/flu yet and want to keep it that way. My girl always gets sick before I do. Damn her feminine immune system lol
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Old 11-21-2016, 09:08 PM   #48
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


43 this morning. Light jacket. But the wife bought one of those dang tv stands with an electric fire place thingy. Had to put that thing together the other night. Living hell. Lol. I really want a chimney-less gas fire place. But that will mean me having free time to build built-ins around it. We really don't get below freezing but a couple of weeks and usually only at night. I miss the fire place we had in the last house.

And yes I miss the snow. Used to live five hours north and we would get just enough to experience it. I feel for you guys that get feet+ of snow every year.

*I've got guys on my crew who have never even seen snow before. #sheltered.


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Old 11-21-2016, 09:11 PM   #49
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


I feel sorry for me too.
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Old 11-22-2016, 09:15 PM   #50
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.

Obviously or likely the BTU's of the wood stove are going to be much more than forced air heat, but I'm just interested in the opportunity cost of wood heat vs working 'x' amount of extra hours at your regular job and buying the energy to heat your home, or buying the wood split & stacked, or wood pellets delivered.

If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (connecting trailer if hauled on trailer, moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.

Multiply your total time by some percent of what your average hourly charge might be for you performing your profession, and add to any of your costs to burn wood.

See how this money compares to just buying the heat energy.

Note: No matter which form of heat comes out more expensive, that doesn't mean you should necessarily choose one form over the other. It just means you now have a better idea of how they compare economically. Some people are going to like each heat source and acquisition method more or less for various reasons, or maybe no particular reason, and that's fine.
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Old 11-22-2016, 09:20 PM   #51
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


My dad's decision to stop burning wood came when he was in his early 70's and mashed his hand in the flat side of the gas splitter, luckily didn't lose use of his hand all said and done. Also just the overall work that got more difficult for him to do safely and easily.
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Old 11-22-2016, 09:31 PM   #52
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by P42003 View Post
It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.

Obviously or likely the BTU's of the wood stove are going to be much more than forced air heat, but I'm just interested in the opportunity cost of wood heat vs working 'x' amount of extra hours at your regular job and buying the energy to heat your home, or buying the wood split & stacked, or wood pellets delivered.

If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (connecting trailer if hauled on trailer, moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.

Multiply your total time by some percent of what your average hourly charge might be for you performing your profession, and add to any of your costs to burn wood.

See how this money compares to just buying the heat energy.

Note: No matter which form of heat comes out more expensive, that doesn't mean you should necessarily choose one form over the other. It just means you now have a better idea of how they compare economically. Some people are going to like each heat source and acquisition method more or less for various reasons, or maybe no particular reason, and that's fine.
There's a reason why my only involvement with heating my house is to set a number on a thermostat and leave it there.
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Old 11-22-2016, 09:36 PM   #53
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by P42003 View Post
It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.

Obviously or likely the BTU's of the wood stove are going to be much more than forced air heat, but I'm just interested in the opportunity cost of wood heat vs working 'x' amount of extra hours at your regular job and buying the energy to heat your home, or buying the wood split & stacked, or wood pellets delivered.

If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (connecting trailer if hauled on trailer, moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.

Multiply your total time by some percent of what your average hourly charge might be for you performing your profession, and add to any of your costs to burn wood.

See how this money compares to just buying the heat energy.

Note: No matter which form of heat comes out more expensive, that doesn't mean you should necessarily choose one form over the other. It just means you now have a better idea of how they compare economically. Some people are going to like each heat source and acquisition method more or less for various reasons, or maybe no particular reason, and that's fine.
They don't do it because they want to count all their time and effort into the deal. They do it so they can save money and possibly the nice effect you get from a roaring fire. With the price they likely charge for their own hourly rate, if it was included in the price of the wood you might as well just poor the oil on the floor and light it because it would still be cheaper then tallying all your time for the heat you can extract from the wood.
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Old 11-22-2016, 10:50 PM   #54
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


My dad salvaged and fixed an old pellet stove. Dump a bag in the top, set the drop rate, clean occasionally. Heated our whole house. All 1000 sq ft anyway.

The pets were always blissfully passed out in front of it every winter.
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Old 11-22-2016, 11:00 PM   #55
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by P42003 View Post
It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.

Obviously or likely the BTU's of the wood stove are going to be much more than forced air heat, but I'm just interested in the opportunity cost of wood heat vs working 'x' amount of extra hours at your regular job and buying the energy to heat your home, or buying the wood split & stacked, or wood pellets delivered.

If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (connecting trailer if hauled on trailer, moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.

Multiply your total time by some percent of what your average hourly charge might be for you performing your profession, and add to any of your costs to burn wood.

See how this money compares to just buying the heat energy.

Note: No matter which form of heat comes out more expensive, that doesn't mean you should necessarily choose one form over the other. It just means you now have a better idea of how they compare economically. Some people are going to like each heat source and acquisition method more or less for various reasons, or maybe no particular reason, and that's fine.
#1 I don't even think about

#2 there aren't any "extra hours" in the winter time. So it saves money that's the whole point.

#3 people have not only been heating this way but cooking as well for thousands of years.
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Old 11-22-2016, 11:57 PM   #56
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Quote:
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It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.
Just bringing the wood in, starting a fire that will often burn 24/7 for weeks at a time, and feeding the fire is a lot of work, not counting getting the wood split and onsite.

Quote:
Originally Posted by P42003 View Post
If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.
The forest around my house hadn't been cut nor thinned for so many years it was scary. I was worried any fire would have burned the house down. I dropped over 48 trees and cleaned out the brush and undergrowth. Spent 3 hours a week for over a year dragging dead stuff out of the forest. Whether I wanted the firewood or not I still had to clean the forest. By the time I was done cleaning the forest we had run a diesel wood chipper for over 25 hours, sometimes feeding 14" wood into it. My pole saw has days of run time on it, as I cleared the canopy of the oaks from dead wood, so they won't crown in the event of a fire. It will reach over 20 ft into the canopy. Pole saw also keeps the driveway clear so fire trucks can get in. Also had a giant 200 year old oak fall over in a storm along with losing some big parts of trees.

Having a working heater and well insulated home controlled by a Nest I have no desire to heat with wood anymore. As I said just before this years fire season I gave away at least 6 cords of wood. This guy hauled three loads with his trailer, and about 4 more pickup loads went away too.
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Old 11-23-2016, 10:11 AM   #57
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by P42003 View Post
It would be interesting if you "woodburners" kept track of all your time and money to supply the wood stove in a season, or a year's time.

Obviously or likely the BTU's of the wood stove are going to be much more than forced air heat, but I'm just interested in the opportunity cost of wood heat vs working 'x' amount of extra hours at your regular job and buying the energy to heat your home, or buying the wood split & stacked, or wood pellets delivered.

If you get the wood for free, but must cut and haul it, include all the time for setup to go get the wood (connecting trailer if hauled on trailer, moving splitter, fueling up trucks & saws, sharpening saw chain, buying bar oil, etc), time cutting and any cleanup (moving limbs, any raking sawdust, sweeping or blowing out haul bed, etc.), time splitting, time hauling from the site and unloading, time stacking, time bringing the wood to the stove, total time over a month fueling the stove & emptying ashes multiplied by the number of months you burn in a season, time cleaning the stovepipe per year, etc.

Multiply your total time by some percent of what your average hourly charge might be for you performing your profession, and add to any of your costs to burn wood.

See how this money compares to just buying the heat energy.

Note: No matter which form of heat comes out more expensive, that doesn't mean you should necessarily choose one form over the other. It just means you now have a better idea of how they compare economically. Some people are going to like each heat source and acquisition method more or less for various reasons, or maybe no particular reason, and that's fine.


The advantage to wood heat, one stick of wood heats you up three times

First when cut,

Second when split

Third when in the stove
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Old 11-23-2016, 07:44 PM   #58
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


In dollars and time, heating with wood seldom pays. But it can be satisfying to cut and heat with your own fuel. I heated my Alaska house for 4 years with wood I cut down from the site clearing.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:37 PM   #59
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


Even though it's argued that California doesn't have seasons, we noticed the temperature drop too. The skies have been grey and everything looks damp from rain/fog/etc. Winter is definitely upon us.
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:17 AM   #60
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Re: Who Has Cold Yet?


We're good at at least 2 things in Canada:

Being polite, and bragging about winter.
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