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College Courses And Education

 
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:35 PM   #1
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College Courses And Education


Hey guys I'm new to the forum and I'm looking to getting started with escavation and construction. I just recently turned 18 and I still have my senior year of highschool left. I was wondering what courses in college I should take to be most prepared for the business world, so I can do the paperwork and run my business officially and efficiently. Right now I have my dads 3-10 john deer backhoe with low hours and we just got a m35 a2 Duce and a half I'm planning to use that to pull my machine at first but with success I'd like to work up to a real dump truck but before I'm really started what should I do after highscool (college wise ) to know how to run things.
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Old 08-25-2019, 10:46 PM   #2
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Re: College Courses And Education


accounting courses

basic english for business

learn how to type & spell

read books by david gerstel

advanced math

go to work for someone for about 10 years

keep notes on time spent on what tasks, type of machines and terrain.

you will also need a pile of cash, credit and a line of credit.

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Old 08-26-2019, 06:07 AM   #3
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Re: College Courses And Education


Thank you, im not sure how to directly reply on here if someone could tell he that would be great thanks
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Old 08-26-2019, 02:15 PM   #4
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Re: College Courses And Education


Push the quote button if you want to reply to a specific post. And welcome!


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Old 08-28-2019, 09:27 AM   #5
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Re: College Courses And Education


Work for the best contractor you can find and learn from them. Work your ass off and learn from them. Show them how much your willing to invest in them and maybe they can be a mentor to you. If you go to college don't get into debt. Good Luck.

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Old 09-05-2019, 06:48 AM   #6
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Re: College Courses And Education


I volunteer at my local high school guiding those who are thinking about going into the trades. And some are eager to start their own business right out of high school. I agree with those who suggest you go apprentice or work for someone else for a good couple of years before considering going out on your own. There are just too many "in the field" topics that you should be comfortable with before even trying on your own.

And there is nothing wrong with you taking some college oriented business classes during a few years, since that is a weakness in the industry. There are many good crafts people who are not good business people, and vice versa. Mix the two and you can have a great career. Even shooting for a few years in the field (minimum) plus having an Associates Degree can be a lethal combination.

By business classes I mean things such as Business Accounting, Marketing, etc. You do not need to go for an MBA since that would be overkill.

I work with some rather talented craftspeople from painting, remodeling, roofing, home building, etc. And while they are really good at what they do, they are also really good at running their business. They are two different topics all together. The trick is to learn how to balance the two, one only happens after you have the experience of working with the tools and materials. The other is learned for dealing with the office side.

Follow the advice of the tradespeople in the field, then mix it with the education on the business side. Be patient building your confidence for both before venturing out on your own. Good luck!
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:58 AM   #7
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Re: College Courses And Education


Quote:
Originally Posted by MOTB View Post
I volunteer at my local high school guiding those who are thinking about going into the trades. And some are eager to start their own business right out of high school. I agree with those who suggest you go apprentice or work for someone else for a good couple of years before considering going out on your own. There are just too many "in the field" topics that you should be comfortable with before even trying on your own.



And there is nothing wrong with you taking some college oriented business classes during a few years, since that is a weakness in the industry. There are many good crafts people who are not good business people, and vice versa. Mix the two and you can have a great career. Even shooting for a few years in the field (minimum) plus having an Associates Degree can be a lethal combination.



By business classes I mean things such as Business Accounting, Marketing, etc. You do not need to go for an MBA since that would be overkill.



I work with some rather talented craftspeople from painting, remodeling, roofing, home building, etc. And while they are really good at what they do, they are also really good at running their business. They are two different topics all together. The trick is to learn how to balance the two, one only happens after you have the experience of working with the tools and materials. The other is learned for dealing with the office side.



Follow the advice of the tradespeople in the field, then mix it with the education on the business side. Be patient building your confidence for both before venturing out on your own. Good luck!


I wouldn't recommend anyone start a construction business with just a couple years experience in the field. Not for carpentry or framing especially. Even remodeling.


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Old 10-04-2019, 09:32 AM   #8
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Re: College Courses And Education


I would recommend you take a little bit of everything when it comes to business classes such as :

Financing, Accounting, Marketing, Operations Management, and Business Communication. All of these courses are great tools to prepare you for the business world. In order to get your contractor license, you will need four years of experience so I recommend you get that after as well.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:04 AM   #9
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Re: College Courses And Education


I'd generally agree, but suggest some small jobs on weekends during school - fixed hourly rate for operator and equipment. Or half day, full day rates. You have to learn to get operating, maintenance, insurance, and the equipment paid for. Paying for equipment is an easy place to mess up if you get free use if your dad's backhoe. The money to buy the next backhoe (or pay the loan) gets figured in, and in your case put it in a set aside account.

Summer time is when to get on as an operator with a big outfit. Get that school paid for, get some experience.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:25 PM   #10
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Re: College Courses And Education


Business skills are usable in all businesses.... work skills might not transfer as well...

Being a great employee and great business person aren't identical sets of skills....

Don't share your dream/goal with everyone, the lazy and ignorant hate those who are succeeding where they have failed.

I find my government employed relatives and friends especially negative about going the small business route to success.
If you do make $, its all from Government actions.......

Middle managers often fear the active smart employee taking "their" Job, thus don't go there for "help" with self improvement or even pretend you are not a worker drone for life....

See "Russian Serf" mentality, if I can't do it, I'll foil those that can....

But learning about money and finances will pay for either. Start saving 10-20% of EVERY dime for your future investment, so you can live off of your equity income instead of your worker income stream.....sooner.

Deferred gratification = nearly anyone that works hard and doesn't spend it all can become a millionaire in 20-25 years even an average job at first.

The sooner You start, the sooner You get there.
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Old 10-14-2019, 11:07 AM   #11
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Re: College Courses And Education


Public speaking is a great course to take as you will need to talk to customers in a professional matter. Some business courses would be helpful as well such as accounting, operations management, business management and some marketing skills come a long way for advertising.
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Old 10-14-2019, 07:53 PM   #12
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Re: College Courses And Education


If you are thinking about going the commercial route, today you almost have to have a 4 year degree. Various schools offer a type of construction management degree. Going back a long time ago, I got a Civil Engineering degree. It opened doors. There's a presumption that if you make it thru college, you are a better hire than someone who came up thru the trades. It depends on what you want to do.

The biggest thing today is computers. By that, I mean a lot of people are trying to do a job paperless. It doesn't work 100%, but it's getting there. There's a lot of "management systems" out there today. Procore, for example. You see everyone walking around with a tablet. Do you want to be a manager or a worker?

Yes, some experience in the trades is great, but does that limit you?

A couple of years ago, a business friend needed to get a painting license in a certain town. For various reasons, he could not qualify to take the test. I agreed to take the test, recognizing I had never painted (and I agree that painting my bedroom doesn't count(. The test had basically nothing to do with how to paint. About 1/2 was business related. It never asked about types of roller covers, brushes, how to cut in, etc. I passed with an 85.

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