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Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?

 
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Old 05-04-2014, 10:12 AM   #21
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Quote:
Originally Posted by CarpenterSFO View Post
A BI overriding an engineer's stamp based on structural concerns? Around here that would be inconceivable.
In any other situation I would have called him on it.

I should of explained this before for clarifacation:
Unfortunately, in this case,the engineer only drew two windows on the gabled wall in the print that was submitted for approval.They are also shorter than what HO wants.

Shear wouldn't have been a factor from looking at that design.
So I can't blame him for his turnaround in approval.
Not sure why all the windows weren't on the plans,but I'm happy that this was caught before the build.
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Old 05-04-2014, 10:58 AM   #22
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Short walls have to resist forces on long walls so big openings penalized you. The BI send you to Simpson for narrow wall panels. The APA also has narrow wall options and the code even has pictures in the IRC. Even if someone shows you the code section it can be difficult to understand. There is all kinds of trade offs the consider window & door heights. It' better to let the engineer to the revised design.
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Old 05-04-2014, 11:07 AM   #23
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


For prescriptive methods You can interpolate most of these charts. It says 2.5 ft at 10ft & 4.5 ft at 20ft. Or 30" & 54". That's a difference of 24" or 2" per foot. So you @ 16ft you need 42" of sheer panel.
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Old 05-04-2014, 11:24 AM   #24
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


I've run across this a few times.

1) use a continuous header corner to corner.

2) horizontal blocking (2x6 or 2x8) mid height

3) full sheet vertical plywood @ every corner
not a strip up to the jack, make sure it goes around window opening.
(you can get 4x9' in zip wall)

4) nail every 4" w/ 8d ring around complete perimeter of sheet

5) corner sheets have to connect to rim and continuous header.

6) your on posts so you may have to connect corner studs to
footing with a wall tie system

7) not sure of your truss co in Ct. but if wind sheer on gable
is an issue, instead of strapping the ceiling, use 2 ft strips
of 3/4 plywood, one at ceiling to wall point and one at the top
of the ceiling peak. depending on the ceiling span, a 2' strip
mid-span will be required.

It's the same as a garage wall with the doors or
door encroaching on the 4 ft from corner measurement.

The company I use for trusses is in Belchertown ma.
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Old 05-04-2014, 12:40 PM   #25
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Go back to the PE
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:01 PM   #26
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Well,got the final drawings from the engineer.After referring to the Simpson site,as instructed by my local BI,we need about 7' of sheer panel,3'6" at each corner.

I mentioned a recent thread here about this issue(https://www.contractortalk.com/f31/lo...-beams-147576/) where there is virtually no sheer protection,and was told only two states have adopted the Simpson requirements.
Those states being Ct. and Virginia.These requirements went into affect March 1st.



Sorry,but I've seen way too many additions built without these requirements,that have stood the test of time,and have my doubts about Simpson's integrity on this issue in this geographic location.
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:53 PM   #27
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Quote:
Originally Posted by oldfrt View Post
Well,got the final drawings from the engineer.After referring to the Simpson site,as instructed by my local BI,we need about 7' of sheer panel,3'6" at each corner.

I mentioned a recent thread here about this issue(https://www.contractortalk.com/f31/lo...-beams-147576/) where there is virtually no sheer protection,and was told only two states have adopted the Simpson requirements.
Those states being Ct. and Virginia.These requirements went into affect March 1st.



Sorry,but I've seen way too many additions built without these requirements,that have stood the test of time,and have my doubts about Simpson's integrity on this issue in this geographic location.
I agree. Which is why I asked earlier if you explored the option of a code modification so you don't have to ruin someone's sunroom with 3'6" of wall before windows.
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Old 05-15-2014, 05:21 AM   #28
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


I am awaiting drawings on a very similar situation. It's a tear down and rebuild close to what's there now, which is about 12" at the corners. I'll let you know how they let it fly over here in your neighbor state.
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Old 05-15-2014, 06:37 AM   #29
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


I knew I read 42". I never looked to hard at the patio enclosure section of the code or the AWC post & beam...try that?
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Old 05-16-2014, 05:23 PM   #30
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


quote=oldfrt;2016918]Well,got the final drawings from the engineer.After referring to the Simpson site,as instructed by my local BI,we need about 7' of sheer panel,3'6" at each corner.

I mentioned a recent thread here about this issuewhere there is virtually no sheer protection,and was told only two states have adopted the Simpson requirements.
Those states being Ct. and Virginia.These requirements went into affect March 1st.



Sorry,but I've seen way too many additions built without these requirements,that have stood the test of time,and have my doubts about Simpson's integrity on this issue in this geographic location.[/quote]

You're going to be governed by either wind or seismic forces for the lateral loading (shear loading) and I think in your case it will probably by the wind that will govern. The engineer should be able to use the requirements per the IBC (International Building Code), or whatever code your building department has adopted. Of course, the more elegant (read more open) the solution the more expensive it will probably be. By doing the calcs there is usually a way to have more open areas than by the prescriptive requirements per the code as they are very conservative (not a bad thing to be).

We use Simpson hardware and components all the time but have never used them as a substitute for a prescriptive solution but as a way to comply with the requirements to avoid the restrictions of a prescriptive solution. Where we work is in a high seismic area so that is almost always governing what we have to provide regarding framing metal components and shear panels.

Simpson makes prefabricated moment frames that will allow for basically completely open spaces wall to wall but they aren't cheap (although they are a lot cheaper than site built and custom designed ones). To use these the engineer or architect (if competent enough for both professions) has to do the structural calculations to determine how large the forces are along the line to have the moment frame and then pick the appropriate one. This is also the way the required openings are determined if one is not using the prescriptive openings per the current code. Here's a link to one of the Simpson pages with an example.
http://www.strongtie.com/products/st...?source=sfnav#

Regarding the fact that many existing structures don't have these PITA shear walls eating up the wall openings, those were built either under an earlier code when there weren't the restrictions that apply today or possibly were done without permits. I don't know when the shear panel requirements started coming out but I've seen a lot of old beach houses that are nothing but glass facing the view with a big beam held up by posts that are also doubling as the window frames for big panes of glass.

P.S. A moment frame would probably be way overkill for your project but I mentioned it as it is a way to get a lot of glass in a wall. Of course then that glass has to comply with the energy efficiency requirements. Up the thread there was a mention of using a continuous header along with some other features and going in that direction will probably work depending how on much weight your structure ends up being and how much of the loading is over the wall you want to be open.

Last edited by Rio; 05-16-2014 at 05:47 PM.
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Old 06-13-2014, 05:23 AM   #31
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Re: Sun Room Shear Wall Requirements?


Wanted to update from my last post, I'm looking at about 12" in the corners then 6' sliders, drawings passed with no special hardware, only 5/8 exterior ply (architect drawn plans). This is with a shed roof conventional framed.

Any update on your job oldfrt?

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