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Production Framing Time Saving Techniques

 
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:52 AM   #101
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by AZ_Framer View Post
Well they're not one man shows. There five man crews, but you have five men doing five different things. If you ever team up it's usually for roof work or running fascia. Most of the time our labors are either putting on hardware, nailing off shear, or right in the foremans ass.
You don't cut your stuff as you build your wall you cut all of it before you build your wall. You read what's on your concrete for your plate and go from there. After doing so many of these tracks Holmes numbers just stick in your head.
I will say the only thing that gives Arizona crews an advantage over other crews is the fact that they are building lumber efficient homes. We don't use channels or Cali corners usually. Layout is all sorts of messed up to. They restart their lay out after the King stud instead of carrying it through the wall. Two foot on center interior walls unless they are bearing.
I'm sure a lot of you older guys are having a hard time believing what I'm telling you but make a trip down here sometime. It's a whole different style of framing.


Restarting layout after the king stub is the dumbest thing I've heard all day. There is a reason why the sizes drywall comes in is divisible by 16" and 24". There are some tract homes that are built well and with integrity and then there are others.
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:00 AM   #102
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by AZ_Framer View Post
I always try to tack shear on my walls before I stand them. 1 nail in eatch top corners then later on after we rack and plumb, a laborer can come and nail them off.
I read a lot of beef production guys talking about having one man cutting all of the seals, cripples, trimmers, headers etc. Here in Arizona any of the track framing I have done, you cut for yourself. Labors will cut mass blocks like 22 1/2, 14 3/8, 49 1/2 yada yada. Any other time you're cutting your own stuff.

Nothing is more efficient than a framer that can cut and nail his own **** is fast as the guys that take two do it. Since I have started framing in Arizona the framers here have taught me the true meaning of efficiency and accuracy.


It's tract home not track home. It comes from a tract of land.

On small addition frames we usually cut and install as we go, but on a new build it is way faster to have one guy cutting, building, and marking headers, from a cut list the foreman wrote at home. If the foreman isn't studying the plan and night and planning the next days activities production will suffer.

On our jobs the foreman usually cuts the stairs by himself after he has lined everyone else up.
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Old 04-30-2015, 11:09 AM   #103
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


When we used to do subdivisions, which I guess you all call tract housing, we used to build sometimes two or three at a time. This way I could run a seven man frame crew which I prefer. This way everyone stayed out of each others way and you had the manpower to lift large walls in one shot. These were houses you could run a plank from house to house. Once the roofs were done you could almost jump from roof to roof. We would build all the subfloors at once, then all the first floor walls, then all the second subfloors ect. This way you could keep about two guys just steady cutting and making headers for everyone else. I second the vote for a telehandler. Wouldn't build without one.
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Old 04-30-2015, 11:34 AM   #104
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


Heres another simple one most of you probably already know. When doing walk out walls and bearing walls in the basements, the masons or form crews very seldom make them level enough to precut studs. I used to shoot each end with a transit, then run a string line and measure each stud. One time this older Italian fellow was watching me. He said why do you measure every stud. He showed me to use my chalk line instead of a string line. Crown all your uncut studs and set one at each layout mark. Stand up the stud as level as possible and gently touch the chalk line with the stud. It makes a nice line for you to square up. Lay the stud back down where it belongs and move to the next one. Have your cut man follow behind squaring and cutting each one being careful not to move it from its location. You can whip in custom walls in no time flat. It helps to have a chalk line with a little more strength so you can pull it tight. If the wall is too long, shoot a stud in the middle with your transit.

Last edited by muskoka guy; 04-30-2015 at 11:36 AM.
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Old 05-16-2015, 05:50 AM   #105
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Lot's of them. My background is I worked on a production framing crew for the last 14 years.

Starting with the basement.
With wood beam have 2 guys start putting it together while the fest, 3 or more start spreading the floor joists on the ground close to where they have to go. One man, the lead most of the time will be laying out the band for the joists.

As soon as the beam is ready everybody lifts it in place and them proceeds to install the joists.

While this is going on the lead starts to layout exterior walls. 3-04 guys lay the plywood, and another starts cutting headers, crips sills etc.

Most houses in 3 hours will have the deck ready to build walls on. The men laying plywood jump to the wall building with one man laying out the studs etc. for the rest.

I can go through the rest of the building if you would like, but you get the idea. We normally had from 5-7 guys on each crew, depending on the size and so on.

Most 2400 sq ft or less houses take 3-3.5 days. The more customization the longer they take!
Smoking fast!so if you have 6 workers and 1 boss(the guy who does nothing)and you put up 2400 feet in 28 hours(3.5 days)avg. crew labor @ 20.00 an hour....cost per foot is .61 cents a foot?$3920.00
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:15 PM   #106
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by muskoka guy View Post
Heres another simple one most of you probably already know. When doing walk out walls and bearing walls in the basements, the masons or form crews very seldom make them level enough to precut studs. I used to shoot each end with a transit, then run a string line and measure each stud. One time this older Italian fellow was watching me. He said why do you measure every stud. He showed me to use my chalk line instead of a string line. Crown all your uncut studs and set one at each layout mark. Stand up the stud as level as possible and gently touch the chalk line with the stud. It makes a nice line for you to square up. Lay the stud back down where it belongs and move to the next one. Have your cut man follow behind squaring and cutting each one being careful not to move it from its location. You can whip in custom walls in no time flat. It helps to have a chalk line with a little more strength so you can pull it tight. If the wall is too long, shoot a stud in the middle with your transit.

Not a bad technique. However, what I've done in that situation in the past, is use a rotating laser level, then shoot elevations at the stud locations and write down the stud length at that location. That way you wouldn't have to worry about your chalk line possibly sagging on long runs. That and it only takes one guy to set up the laser and get the elevations.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:36 AM   #107
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by JesseCocozza View Post
Not a bad technique. However, what I've done in that situation in the past, is use a rotating laser level, then shoot elevations at the stud locations and write down the stud length at that location. That way you wouldn't have to worry about your chalk line possibly sagging on long runs. That and it only takes one guy to set up the laser and get the elevations.

That's what's I do as well. Goes super quick and accurate.


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Old 05-18-2015, 09:23 PM   #108
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by JesseCocozza View Post
Not a bad technique. However, what I've done in that situation in the past, is use a rotating laser level, then shoot elevations at the stud locations and write down the stud length at that location. That way you wouldn't have to worry about your chalk line possibly sagging on long runs. That and it only takes one guy to set up the laser and get the elevations.
I prefer that method. Needless to say the day the laser went out of whack and i ended up with stud lengths 3/8"-3/4" high I went nuts
The guys told me they were scared that day
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Old 05-18-2015, 09:26 PM   #109
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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I prefer that method. Needless to say the day the laser went out of whack and i ended up with stud lengths 3/8"-3/4" high I went nuts

The guys told me they were scared that day

Had one of those days one time too. It was sad until we got another fancy new green laser.
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:09 PM   #110
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


I have a stupid question about sheathing walls on the deck before standing. If I'm doing an addition with 3 new exterior walls, 2 of them parallel to each other and 1 perpendicular to those 2, how do you sheathe all the walls? I mean, with the first wall framed you'll just sheathe from stud to stud. But the the other 2 walls, you'll have to extend the sheathing 6" past the edge (5 1/2" for 2x6 + 1/2" for sheathing). If you've only got, say 16', how do you install and raise 16'6" of sheathing?

I feel like I'm missing something totally obvious, but I'm just not getting it.
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:55 PM   #111
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


Leave the corner pieces off
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Old 05-24-2015, 06:01 AM   #112
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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I have a stupid question about sheathing walls on the deck before standing. If I'm doing an addition with 3 new exterior walls, 2 of them parallel to each other and 1 perpendicular to those 2, how do you sheathe all the walls? I mean, with the first wall framed you'll just sheathe from stud to stud. But the the other 2 walls, you'll have to extend the sheathing 6" past the edge (5 1/2" for 2x6 + 1/2" for sheathing). If you've only got, say 16', how do you install and raise 16'6" of sheathing?

I feel like I'm missing something totally obvious, but I'm just not getting it.
Always cut back from the edges and openings 1/8" or so, if the sheathing hangs past the corner or into the openings it could cause an issue- push out a cornerboard if it is going to be sided with wood or if you have a tight fit for a door or window.

I cut the fill in pieces and tack it to the wall back from the corner before standing up the wall, when doing the backwork the helper has the piece already cut to size right there, no need to setup for sheathing later.

Last edited by OMB; 05-24-2015 at 07:00 AM.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:14 AM   #113
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


Cut a 6" strip? Add to end of wall before standing.
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Old 05-24-2015, 10:34 AM   #114
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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I have a stupid question about sheathing walls on the deck before standing. If I'm doing an addition with 3 new exterior walls, 2 of them parallel to each other and 1 perpendicular to those 2, how do you sheathe all the walls? I mean, with the first wall framed you'll just sheathe from stud to stud. But the the other 2 walls, you'll have to extend the sheathing 6" past the edge (5 1/2" for 2x6 + 1/2" for sheathing). If you've only got, say 16', how do you install and raise 16'6" of sheathing?

I feel like I'm missing something totally obvious, but I'm just not getting it.
You have to stand the wall up then slide it over the 5 7/8" to set it. When you building it,it will hang off the floor on the other side. You just have to think ahead a bit
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Old 05-24-2015, 12:58 PM   #115
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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You have to stand the wall up then slide it over the 5 7/8" to set it. When you building it,it will hang off the floor on the other side. You just have to think ahead a bit
JT,

If you're working clockwise around the building, or if it's a large building and you can push the walls out, then I can understand this. But for example, the job I have coming up is a small addition to the back of the house, so I am building 3 new walls. The 4th wall is the existing exterior wall of the house, so that's already up and will prevent me from hanging the 2 side walls over 6". The only way to do it that I could see is to leave the corner pieces off as stated earlier. moot saying I think you're wrong, but I'm just not visualizing it. When you frame your walls, do you work clockwise around the building, or do you do like the front and back walls then the side walls? I was taught to do opposite walls first then the perpendicular walls third and fourth.
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Old 05-24-2015, 03:09 PM   #116
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Originally Posted by muskoka guy View Post
Heres another simple one most of you probably already know. When doing walk out walls and bearing walls in the basements, the masons or form crews very seldom make them level enough to precut studs. I used to shoot each end with a transit, then run a string line and measure each stud. One time this older Italian fellow was watching me. He said why do you measure every stud. He showed me to use my chalk line instead of a string line. Crown all your uncut studs and set one at each layout mark. Stand up the stud as level as possible and gently touch the chalk line with the stud. It makes a nice line for you to square up. Lay the stud back down where it belongs and move to the next one. Have your cut man follow behind squaring and cutting each one being careful not to move it from its location. You can whip in custom walls in no time flat. It helps to have a chalk line with a little more strength so you can pull it tight. If the wall is too long, shoot a stud in the middle with your transit.
The guy who taught me to frame always did that. I finally documented it on one job.
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:16 PM   #117
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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Had one of those days one time too. It was sad until we got another fancy new green laser.
I have bosh one that show vertical and horizontal plane. It is accurate and extremely handy. I just leveled entire old house with it. Bosh dot laser make me trouble and is not accurate.
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Old 05-25-2015, 07:24 AM   #118
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Re: Production Framing Time Saving Techniques


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You have to stand the wall up then slide it over the 5 7/8" to set it. When you building it,it will hang off the floor on the other side. You just have to think ahead a bit
This is another "tool in the toolbox", can't be used all the time but when you can it is a handy technique. A lot of the walls I have done are long and/or tall so I "tack and strap" the wall to the deck, there is no sliding to be done.

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