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Portland, ME Residential

 
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:05 PM   #161
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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You know, I usually scatter roof sheeting all over the joists. Mostly for safety, but also a place to lay your tools.
Is that a double hip?
I usually do also, but I was in a hurry and I shouldn't have been. We had quite a few of the commons up there to walk on as planks. I should amend that tomorrow morning.

Yeah, that's a double 2x10 DF 24' long. Makes no sense to me either. The structural is really odd on this frame. The engineer calls for 2x6 CJ's spanning 16'. That is way too much span. Trusses would have been so easy on this home.
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:25 PM   #162
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Thanks for posting this
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:31 PM   #163
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Looking good Kent,
Like the idea on the 1" rip over the ridge.

The guy I do framing with will only figure his rafter lengths with the framing square,
marking out the feet and inches like a stair stringer.
Then he always double checks with his 30 year old length guide he keeps together with an elastic band.

But that's what I expect from someone who still uses a 30 year old framing hammer
that now has a smooth grip and short claw, because its been put to the grinder too many times
to resharpen the ends.
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Old 01-14-2010, 07:09 PM   #164
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


We laid some ply up there knucklehead. Good call, I should have done it anyway.

Not much to show, plugging along slowly. We had a setback on the windows and soffit. I have my overhang too much for the windows, they have some type of built on casing (3") so we were going over that today, trying to regroup. Man I hate these days. Felt like I did nothing.

But we did. I was one man short for the day.

By early afternoon, we had it pretty much cut for the main part.



Heading out, we had one side almost ready for ply. It has to go up tomorrow (the ply) I need to get 'er done.

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Old 01-14-2010, 08:48 PM   #165
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Lookin good framerman...Won't be long and the fun will be over.... I love the roof framing.
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:30 PM   #166
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Lookin good framerman...Won't be long and the fun will be over.... I love the roof framing.

I agree roof framing is my favorite and for some reason i only like to hand nail rafters but im feeling the it being over and we only just started setting the main roofline today
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Old 01-14-2010, 09:47 PM   #167
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Quick explanation on how to set up the main skeleton. 3 guys total. Pick one rafter, the lower guy nails his tail in while another (me, on scaffold) holds it. Once nailed a very temp brace/kicker holds the rafter up. We then move to the other end of the front roof plane and do the same thing.
An old geezer (he's two years older than me, so I'm allowed to say that) taught me how to do this with two guys.

The man on the scaffold holds up two opposing rafters with a ridge-sized scrap between them, and the bottom man (hustling!) nails the ends down. At that point, the weight of the rafters will hold that loose scrap in place. Nail a temp brace on one to keep them from flopping over sideways.

Go to the other end and repeat the procedure.

Now you have a pair of rafters at each end awaiting the ridge beam. You both get up on the scaffolding and lift the beam into place, dislodging the scraps as you do so. Tack in place, and you're ready to roll.
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Old 01-14-2010, 10:19 PM   #168
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Looks nice Kent.

Are you siding that house too? How much more time do you have there?
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:26 AM   #169
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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The job looks great. All the cuts are good and tight. I am curious though, why the broken hips (to the front) are run all the way from the plates instead of from the gable ridges? Why are the hips fully framed in the attic space?
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:41 PM   #170
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Looks nice Kent.

Are you siding that house too? How much more time do you have there?
No, not siding it. It's vinyl and I haven't done vinyl since the 80's. I wouldn't know where to begin. I have about 2 or 3 weeks left there. I have to start the garage roof next and I have another small one in the front entry. Plus 4 stairs and all of the inside non bearing walls.

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The job looks great. All the cuts are good and tight. I am curious though, why the broken hips (to the front) are run all the way from the plates instead of from the gable ridges? Why are the hips fully framed in the attic space?
I am going to take my best shot at this since I really don't have a good answer for you. The structural engineer designed this. There are quite a few very odd things on the structural prints. Not many hips are done around here so it is a little foreign to most people as to how you can properly do this without all of the junk that is in this one.

There are double 2x10 hips. That in itself makes no sense. There's a quad LVL holding up part of the roof and the point load goes to a double LVL in the floor system. There was (3) 9-1/2" LVL's in the front rim of the second floor and above was a window with direct alignment to the window below. No structural ridge. The 3 LVL's were essentially holding up 3' of floor framing. This could easily have been done in trusses and more than likely cheaper with the size of the rafters and hips, yet the CJ's are 2x6 and spanning 16'.

I need to get my structural license.
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:26 PM   #171
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Do you mean valleys?
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:33 PM   #172
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Kent, I think I want to be a framer when I grow up. To be able to stand back and see that must feel great.
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Old 01-16-2010, 12:09 AM   #173
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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I have about 2 or 3 weeks left there

Do we have anything to do next month?
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Old 01-16-2010, 04:42 AM   #174
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


I just picked up on this thread this evening and I just spent 2+ hours framing a house. I feel great.

I now feel that I should have done a blog like this on the project we are currently on, a 2000+ sq. ft. deck that wraps around the 2nd story of a existing home. But I didn't. Plus, for various reasons, it hasn't turned out to be a very production oriented project, and I don't think that I could handle all of the questions nearly as well as framerman has.

Great job Framerman and thanks from all the little people. I can't wait to see it through til the end.
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Old 01-16-2010, 09:17 PM   #175
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Do you mean valleys?
No, I mean hips. Like I said, it's off kilter. If I was to contact the engineer about all of the items I felt were unnecessary, overkill, could do it better this way, we would be re-engineering the whole thing. I don't want to bad mouth the guy, but there could have been much better ways to design the structural on this home than the way it is.

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Kent, I think I want to be a framer when I grow up. To be able to stand back and see that must feel great.
Before I started this job, it had been almost 3 years since I did some real framing, especially under contract. I want out of framing to be honest, out for good. I really love framing and even though it is in the winter, and some days have been brutally cold, I am really enjoying myself. I am giving the HO and contractor a top notch quality job and they have said that they appreciate my attention to the details.

I love looking back on my way out to see what I accomplished for the day. It's very satisfying. And at the same time, very hard on the body. I'm feeling it in all the joints and muscles.

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Do we have anything to do next month?
Not yet Gus, not yet. There is some whispers of an addition in the works. I still have to contact a guy about a commercial job in Portland and I should be on that. I am too focused on getting this home covered before any real snow happens and also getting it done efficiently. This has been one of my big problems when I work is that I get too wrapped up in the project that I neglect keeping the work coming.

I had a hit on a cabinet job, but it didn't come through. A hit is better than no hit.

February is notoriously the coldest and snowiest month here and it's coming soon. Time to get on the ball and put some work in the pipeline.
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Old 01-16-2010, 09:47 PM   #176
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


I'm still holding out that a great job for you and your shop will show up soon.

Lets keep the faith and spread the word.

Hey guys ! Kent is a millwork and cabinet specialist with mad skilz and a nice shop. He is currently looking to fill a gap in his schedule in February.
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Old 01-16-2010, 10:05 PM   #177
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Awhile back, I got to the picky point in my life concerning framing. I am constantly checking every little thing as I walk through the home. Studs flush with the plates, sills flush with the trimmers....

And when I finds things like this, it goes into the nagging frustration bin. I think to myself along the lines of "why is this like this?" I cannot watch everyone as the job goes along and I have to assume they are doing what they are supposed to be doing.

I'm picky because my system works very good for me. It's efficient and quick. When little things like this show up, it means that there is possibly some **** up somewhere. Something that someone did not pay attention to. To me, if you're not paying attention, you're going to **** something up and slow the job down. Everything counts.....everything. All of the little details where things should be the way they should be.

This, for example, is not serious by any means. But why is this necessary? Long point flush to the ridge. Simple. You are there working on the top of the rafter, only a few things to check before you nail it for good. One is "is the long point flush with the ridge?"



Close up of the Zip System. I really like this stuff. There are a few things to watch for. This stuff will slice your hands up. The splinters on the edge of the ply have sliced up my hands pretty good. The tape is a little PITA, but not bad. I don't care for the tape dispenser. I precut 4' strips for the seams on the roof and today I tried something different and it worked decent. But again, there's always a few ways to skin a cat.



Here's my hips coming into the ridge. This home everything came together nicely in the roof system. I cut everything to theoretical and it all landed perfectly. Again, the double hips....completely unnecessary from a structural view. Got to do what the plans say though.



I don't know why, but I just found this picture to be mesmerizing.



Hip....straight as an arrow. The quad LVL is my theoretical termination of the run of the main roof. The point of the bullnose of the hips goes flush to the end of the LVL beams. Nice nasty ass ratty White Pine in the background.



My rafter blocks. I started another thread about these and found it interesting the way others perceive the necessity of these. I have company in the background. Someone doing a vinyl siding job and from where I am, it looks very good.



My HD wall brackets. There was a story in the news recently about 4 workers on staging like this that collapsed. I saw the 6 o'clock news clip and saw the kicker poking through the ply. If you use these and aren't using at least a little piece of ply like I have here, you are playing with fire.



Did a little o-ring repair today on the ol' girl. Driver kept sliding down. I treat my tools awful.



Anyone use these adjustable roof brackets? These are the sweetest ones I have ever owned. Adjust to any roof pitch. I refuse to use those wood ones. I just don't feel comfortable with those wood ones.



That's it for today. I may have some tomorrow since I didn't get any at the end of the day today. Had a late end trying to get those "one last piece" and it got dark on me.
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Old 01-17-2010, 07:58 AM   #178
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Framerman,

How do your wall brackets attach to the wall at the top of the bracket? we use something similar but they are more homemade out of angle iron. Three pieces of angle iron are welded togeather to make a right triangle. The one against the wall has 6 holes drilled at the top to nail with common 16's and one hole at the bottom to keep it from sliding.

I have had one give on me. The guy I was working with was standing right next to me and we were trying to get the 2x8 gutter to go up a little more and you know the rest. We both fell about 13 feet, both escaping serious injury.
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Old 01-17-2010, 08:12 AM   #179
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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I have half a dozen of those jacks. They are great in certain situations. I always drill them through next to a stud, put a block across two or more studs in the back and tack the bottom into the wall stud, so it can't push through the sheathing.
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Old 01-17-2010, 12:07 PM   #180
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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why is this necessary? Long point flush to the ridge. Simple. You are there working on the top of the rafter, only a few things to check before you nail it for good. One is "is the long point flush with the ridge?"
Had to be a sea-sick beaver for a cut man....

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