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Portland, ME Residential

 
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Old 12-21-2009, 07:58 PM   #61
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Definitely less productive to hang it over, but code here requires it. If we don't do it and get busted, we have to install a crazy Simpson strap every 4' around the whole structure. I guess it helps to tie the walls to the floor during high winds but............... I hate it still cause its a pain! I can't tell from your pics, but do you wrap the plywood at the corners, or do you just butt the walls together? Code doesn't require us to do this, but I do it anyway. Just the way I was taught and now its just 2nd nature.

what straps? im from NW Ohio and we have to hang over and thats it but i wrap the corners too
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:14 PM   #62
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Those are cave man jacks. That's when old school was new school.

They still have the sticker on the side. I don't think these guys are still in business. Hoitsma





I don't hang the ply over.



I understand your perspective. I know you are looking at adding straps to be extra cautious. This is a big mass of a wall, but when you chunk it down, I had an excessive amount of nails in the bottom plate to cover myself.

However, if I saw a guy next door trying this, I would probably be concerned for him myself.

I have occasionally in the past used the metal straps but found it unnecessary in almost all instances. If I hear too many of the nails letting go, I jump out and put some kickers on the rim. I haven't had one let go.

Here is about as accurate as I can describe how to properly put nails into the bottom plate for holding it there.

1¼" off the bottom at a 45° angle. When you are through lifting, you should see the nail poking out of the side of the plate about 1/4" above the floor. When you are lifting, the nail obviously hooks around. If you poke the nail through the bottom plate plane, that's one area where you run the risk of the plate letting go. The nails will lift up the bottom plate off the floor as you lift. Not enough and the nail splits the bottom plate, leaving little resistance to the wall sliding out.


Have you ever just tack the wall to the chaulk line?

We have done that on the long walls with a gun and had good luck, saves time with the handnails and wrestleing the wall after the studs are nailed to it.

Nice pictures!!
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Old 12-21-2009, 08:25 PM   #63
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Have you ever just tack the wall to the chaulk line?

We have done that on the long walls with a gun and had good luck, saves time with the handnails and wrestleing the wall after the studs are nailed to it.

Nice pictures!!
That's exactly what I do. No hand drives at all. Nail the wall exactly where it's supposed to go left to right and when it's up, there's not much chance it's going over the edge before temp braces are attached. It stops in it's tracks at 90°.
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Old 12-22-2009, 07:53 PM   #64
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Here is about as accurate as I can describe how to properly put nails into the bottom plate for holding it there.

1¼" off the bottom at a 45° angle. When you are through lifting, you should see the nail poking out of the side of the plate about 1/4" above the floor. When you are lifting, the nail obviously hooks around. If you poke the nail through the bottom plate plane, that's one area where you run the risk of the plate letting go. The nails will lift up the bottom plate off the floor as you lift. Not enough and the nail splits the bottom plate, leaving little resistance to the wall sliding out.

That’s a nice detail drawing and explanation for that SOP tech. I don’t see many guys in my local doing it though since we primarily use slab foundations. It is still a good trick to know and I have adapted it to truss rolling and stick roof purlin.


Btw, enjoying your sound bytes. Sounds like you’re a soloist. You play a mean nailer!


Looking good, and actually better than it sounds. (Cut cut cut, pop pop pop, brrrrrrrrr....rt)
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Old 12-22-2009, 08:32 PM   #65
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Wall raising time!

From this point forward, you just may think I am crazy. For the past 10 years, every home I have framed, they think I am crazy. Here goes. I raised this myself. Wall jacks. The old ones. Yes I know they are dangerous. It has been my best money spent. I paid $50 for the pair.

This is not for Rookie n00bs.
First off I have never used wall jacks so excuse my ignorance,but how is using wall jacks anymore dangerous then a bunch of guys standing it by hand?

I recently purchased some qualcraft wall jacks and home to use them soon to me they seem like a safer method than standing by hand.I'm really digging this thread one of the better ones I've seen in a long time and your framing looks great
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Old 12-22-2009, 09:41 PM   #66
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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That’s a nice detail drawing and explanation for that SOP tech. I don’t see many guys in my local doing it though since we primarily use slab foundations. It is still a good trick to know and I have adapted it to truss rolling and stick roof purlin.


Btw, enjoying your sound bytes. Sounds like you’re a soloist. You play a mean nailer!


Looking good, and actually better than it sounds. (Cut cut cut, pop pop pop, brrrrrrrrr....rt)
Thanks for the compliments. I was there by myself on Saturday, but I do have workers. I had more Thursday than Friday if you get my gist.

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First off I have never used wall jacks so excuse my ignorance,but how is using wall jacks anymore dangerous then a bunch of guys standing it by hand?

I recently purchased some qualcraft wall jacks and home to use them soon to me they seem like a safer method than standing by hand.I'm really digging this thread one of the better ones I've seen in a long time and your framing looks great
They aren't more dangerous. I was referring to standing a 52' wall by yourself with old school wall jacks. However, if you pick a 2x with knots or splits, you are playing with fire. I personally have never tried the cable ones, though they look much easier. I can't complain for $50. It will stand anything I need.

And thank you for the compliments also.

First floor exterior walls are done, garage walls are going up tomorrow, hopefully complete. One guy is going back in to do bearing walls. It's going to be an odd scene for most framers, so be patient and I will explain soon.

Here is my second floor frame design, coming soon.

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Old 12-22-2009, 09:50 PM   #67
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


looks like a nice home
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Old 12-22-2009, 10:55 PM   #68
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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Originally Posted by framerman View Post
Here is about as accurate as I can describe how to properly put nails into the bottom plate for holding it there.

1¼" off the bottom at a 45° angle. When you are through lifting, you should see the nail poking out of the side of the plate about 1/4" above the floor. When you are lifting, the nail obviously hooks around. If you poke the nail through the bottom plate plane, that's one area where you run the risk of the plate letting go. The nails will lift up the bottom plate off the floor as you lift. Not enough and the nail splits the bottom plate, leaving little resistance to the wall sliding out.

I aim for shooting them right through the back corner instead of 1/4" from the back corner like in your picture. If you have an anal superintendent and he sees those nails in your plate after the wall is up, he will make you spend time pulling them all out. But if he doesn't see them, it won't bother him.
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Old 12-24-2009, 07:52 AM   #69
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Phew, between the first and 2nd floors that is a hell of alot of joist hangers!
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:45 AM   #70
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


What program are you using for your renderings? Very nice details....
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Old 12-24-2009, 11:15 AM   #71
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Very very nice frame.
Good details
Good systems


I'm on Little Sebago with potential for a couple of projects.

Where is this project in Portland?

Are you doing frame to finish? For HO or General?

Love your work
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:59 PM   #72
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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I aim for shooting them right through the back corner instead of 1/4" from the back corner like in your picture. If you have an anal superintendent and he sees those nails in your plate after the wall is up, he will make you spend time pulling them all out. But if he doesn't see them, it won't bother him.
Yeah, I'm anal myself. I pull them. I try to put myself into the customers shoes and I feel that if I saw those left there, I would be thinking "what else is he leaving?" I pop shiners back through the ply also.

Quote:
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Phew, between the first and 2nd floors that is a hell of alot of joist hangers!
You aren't joking. I can only imagine what the HVAC, plumber and electrician are going to think about all the flush beams that they can't drill through.

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
What program are you using for your renderings? Very nice details....
I use a few different programs. The gray background is Rhino, the framing rendering is an old version of Revit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tcleve4911 View Post
Very very nice frame.
Good details
Good systems


I'm on Little Sebago with potential for a couple of projects.

Where is this project in Portland?

Are you doing frame to finish? For HO or General?

Love your work
I hope you get them tcleve. The project is in N. Deering, near Falmouth. Just framing on this one. I tried to get the finish, but the GC is the finish contractor.

Thank you for the compliments everyone. I have pictures of the garage coming up after this post.
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Old 12-26-2009, 04:24 PM   #73
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


This is the start of my Wednesday. The garage took too much time IMO, but there were some factors, one obviously is Christmas. I should have easily had this done in one day. Thursday was a half day. Today was a half day. I took time to have some steel I-beams set, set some lumber packages on the ground, etc.

I have been doing the garages this way for years and I realize it takes more time, but when I'm done, the top plates are perfectly flat.

Here's my start. Main floor bearing walls are done. Yes I know I don't have to use the zip system in the garage. It's all we had. Hindsight.



Plate is bolted down and detailed for windows, doors and studs.



I set up the transit and get my 4 corners set level, and temp brace it off. Nothing too solid, I take the braces off later. Check out the blue sky on this day!



From this point I run a chalk line on top of the end studs. I pick up one stud at a time, carefully put it in place, and use the chalkline to mark the end of the stud. After I mark them all, I cut them in one pass, then I toenail them in place, usually 2 nails each side and an occasional one on the face and maybe one on the back side.



This is where it sucks. I should bring my 24' aluminum plank to do this, it would be so much easier, but we did this off the ladder. You can see the chalkline for the adjacent wall on the top of the screen.



Getting the side wall done. The windows are done slightly different. We put the king studs up, then pack the header up to the underside of the top plate. Shove a trimmer underneath when we get the exact length, and finish off the window package.



Front wall being worked on. You can see the boom truck lifted the I-beams up for me. What a lifesaver!



Finished all the garage framing. It takes awhile, but it sure comes out clean and everyone is happy with the results, especially me.



Awhile back, on the wall lifting post, I mentioned about plate selection. I always grab the straightest, nicest material for the top plates. Here's why. You can see I am going to have zero troubles with line and brace. If I had used crooked, warped junk, I would be fighting it for awhile. This is as easy as grabbing a 10' brace, checking the string, nail it in place. Done. This is a 75' long back wall. Straight as can be.

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Old 12-26-2009, 04:34 PM   #74
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


You can see here that I have used a 3' piece of PT for against the foundation stem wall. There's already a double stud there, so this is not creating any hinge effects anywhere. They don't drop the walls down because of the water splashing on the siding.



Time to put ply up. I will pull down from the straight top plate, run a chalkline across, and use the starter pieces on the bottom first. Front walls get a double block at the seams. This is an unusual area. They don't have any provisions for shear walls, I've never seen one called out ever. I still do my part anyway. Anchor bolts are not in the strategic place they should be.



Next up is the top ply on the wall. Cut it out on the ground and easily put it up.



Sidewall complete. I will leave the window openings covered until windows arrive. Keeps wind down and snow out some, not much.



That's it. 2nd floor framing starting Monday, weather permitting. Snowing right now, rain tomorrow.
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Old 12-26-2009, 04:48 PM   #75
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


How did you get that lumber in the garage? Why?
Is that a window in the wall between the garage and the house?
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Old 12-26-2009, 04:58 PM   #76
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


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How did you get that lumber in the garage? Why?
Is that a window in the wall between the garage and the house?
Lumber trucks come out with boom lifts. We put it in the garage for weather protection and to keep it out of the driveway. We have very limited space out front. It's literally the neighbors front yard/driveway. I have enough room to put my truck.

There is a door going into the basement that is lower than the other door. It starts at the top of the foundation. I've hit my head on the ply a few times already.
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Old 12-26-2009, 05:28 PM   #77
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Lookin' good Framerman.
I'm more than a little envious though. I haven't done a wood framing job in over two years.I want one.
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Old 12-26-2009, 05:59 PM   #78
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Looks great!
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Old 12-26-2009, 06:41 PM   #79
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Sometimes the "logistics " of the job can be the hardest part! Careful planning makes all the difference. looks good . Good luck on the weather. It was almost 50 here Tuesday when it started raining. It is about 12 now and it is still snowing.
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Old 12-27-2009, 08:00 AM   #80
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Re: Portland, ME Residential


Looks nice, and that zip wall stuff is cool.
But won't the zip wall put a lot of Maine siders out of biz? Down here we say all you need to be a sider in Maine is a staple gun

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