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Light And Quiet Trim Compressor

 
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Old 04-08-2009, 10:11 PM   #1
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Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


well... my little 2 gallon dewalt took a crap on me today
this has been a favorite, though far from perfect, compressor.
i liked it cause it had a small footprint, it weighed about 30 lbs so it was very easy to lug around and load in the van... also it was fairly quiet. she was belt driven and drew very little juice so i didn't have to worry about blowing breakers or long extension cords etc etc etc
this is the second time i have had this problem... the first it was under warranty and i took it to the dewalt place and it took them a frig'n month to get it back to me... now it's over 2 years and I'm sure it's going to be a hassle.. and NO, IT'S NOT A BLOWN FUSE!!
so rather than waiting a potential month, i figure i could capitalize on this opportunity to buy a shiny new toy, maybe a better one?!

so... before i pick up the same dewalt, i figure i could get some insight as to if there was something better with in the parameters of quiet and light. there used to be a nice craftsman, but it is no longer available.
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Old 04-09-2009, 02:44 AM   #2
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


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Old 04-09-2009, 07:06 AM   #3
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Here is my "trim compressor" summary (the prices are out of date):

I've done some research on some popular trim compressors mentioned here (Thomas 617HDN, Dewalt/Emglo D55140, Bostitch Trim Air CAP1516, Senco PC1010, Makita MAC700, & Campbell Hausfeld FP2040). They can all do the job (most around 1.0 CFM @ 100 psi)...so it comes down to these criteria:

Weight, Noise, Price and Longevity/Reliability.

Weight (range from 18 lbs. to 52 lbs.):

CH is the lightest at 18#, followed closely by Bostitch & Senco (20#), then Dewalt (24#), Thomas (26#), and Makita dead last (twice as heavy as the others).

Noise (range from 60 db to 80 db)

Thomas is the winner here @ 60 db with CH FP2040 a close 2nd (FP2048 is 10 db louder), then DeWalt and Senco @ 69 db, Bostitch @ 75 db and Makita last again @ 80 db

Price (range $99 to $316):

CH is cheapest ($99), then Senco ($130), Makita ($156), Dewalt ($179), Bostitch ($182), and Thomas is most expensive ($316). The factory recon Bostitch is $120.

On longevity, Most of these are new on the market...so we shall see. Thomas has a good pedigree (made in WI even), Makita is an oiled unit, and Dewalt/Emglo looks well built. Bostitch is available reconditioned already (is that a bad sign?). At $99 the CH is almost disposable.

My conclusions:

Top tool...Thomas (super quiet, light, & good quality with price to match).

Best Buy...CH FP2040 (cheapest, lightest, and only Thomas is quieter)

Dewalt & Bostitch & Senco are in the middle (all are light & fairly quiet at low prices). Dewalt looks more rugged and well designed compared to the others...worth a look (I bought the DeWalt 1 gal. three years ago and it has been great--sorry to hear about your experience with it's big brother).

Worst (IMO)...Makita (twice as heavy and many x's louder than other "trim compressors").

If you have ruled out the DeWalt, try Senco or if you have the budget, Thomas.

All of these are much quieter than my old PC pancake (noisy beast @ 87 db) and only the Makita is heavier.

Since the decibel scale is a logrithmic measure of sound energy, I have read that a 10 dB increase is 10x's the sound energy (this may be innacurate)...Wikipedia suggets we hear a 10 dB as a 2 fold increase in noise level. It follows that the MAC700 would then sound half as noisy as "most compressors." It also means the Dewalt and Senco trim compressors sound half as loud as the Makita...the Thomas and CH half as loud again.
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Old 04-09-2009, 08:53 AM   #4
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Nice response Bass.

When you get your new pumper make sure you use at least a 12 ga cord no longer than 50ft. while using it.
I think that is why our tools "wear out" so to speak and take the proverbial dump as you mentioned.
Voltage drop is a real cancer on a tools life. I know what some jobs look like with a bunch of snakes coming from the power source. It's ugly.
Set yourself up with your own trunk line of a 10 ga cord to your splitter.

If you already do that, never mind
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Old 04-09-2009, 06:33 PM   #5
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


I'm a die-hard Rol Air fan and never hesitate to recommend them, I am currently using a 1.5 horse model like in the picture. It's not real quiet, but during regular use it only runs for 5 or 10 seconds at a time. They also have a 1 hp model that is quieter but takes longer to fill the tank, so it's a toss-up. If you do buy Rol-air, you can be sure that it's the last compressor you will have to buy for a LONG time.
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Old 04-09-2009, 07:20 PM   #6
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


jl- nice compressor!! will look into that for a future buy when my 2hp 4 gal. dies. it's a CH and it's been kicking strong over 6 years (knock on wood)

gus- does a long cord run still have negative effects on smaller loads?? i have 10awg, 12awg and 14 awg of verious lengths, but usually use the 12

bass- very nice review! i loved the 2 gal. dewalt and i might just go get the 1 gal. version for $119 at depot tomorrow and ship off the 2 gal. for repair. i would buy that thomas, but i need to continue to be conservitave til i work up some capital.

thanks
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Old 04-09-2009, 07:22 PM   #7
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


[quote=basswood;654113]Here is my "trim compressor" summary (the prices are out of date):

On longevity, Most of these are new on the market...so we shall see. Thomas has a good pedigree (made in WI even), Makita is an oiled unit, and Dewalt/Emglo looks well built. Bostitch is available reconditioned already (is that a bad sign?). At $99 the CH is almost disposable.

My conclusions:

Top tool...Thomas (super quiet, light, & good quality with price to match).

I will have to replace my Thomas Ultra Airpac 4.5 gallon 1 1/4 hp pancake pretty soon . The thing is 14 years old and had a very hard life . I will get another Thomas and hopefully at least 10 years out of it . The extra price was so worth it after going through a couple of craftsmans and bostiches before getting the Thomas .
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Old 04-09-2009, 07:31 PM   #8
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


ive got the little senco and love it for trim. Very light and quiet.
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Old 04-09-2009, 08:56 PM   #9
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by world llc View Post
gus- does a long cord run still have negative effects on smaller loads?? i have 10awg, 12awg and 14 awg of verious lengths, but usually use the 12
Can I pretend to be Gus? I don't have a CNC machine, but I used to be an electronics tech.

Bottom line is that the longer the cord, the more voltage drop you have with any given current draw. Now, if your current draw is negligible, you won't have much of a drop even with a skinny-gauge wire--but for any compressor, it's not really all that negligible.

I'd never run a compressor off anything lighter than 12 gauge. MOF, I don't even carry any 14 gauge cords. A small compressor would probably do okay in most cases with 50' of 12 gauge (or less).

For a mid to heavy range compressor, you might get away with 12 gauge at 25' for the mid-range, but for longer runs and/or a heavy-duty compressor, definitely go with 10 gauge.

You might be able to get away with flouting those rules for a while, but you would be putting unnecessary strain with a concomitant heat load on the machine--inevitably shortening its life.
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Old 04-09-2009, 09:28 PM   #10
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinstaafl View Post
Can I pretend to be Gus? I don't have a CNC machine, but I used to be an electronics tech.

Bottom line is that the longer the cord, the more voltage drop you have with any given current draw. Now, if your current draw is negligible, you won't have much of a drop even with a skinny-gauge wire--but for any compressor, it's not really all that negligible.

I'd never run a compressor off anything lighter than 12 gauge. MOF, I don't even carry any 14 gauge cords. A small compressor would probably do okay in most cases with 50' of 12 gauge (or less).

For a mid to heavy range compressor, you might get away with 12 gauge at 25' for the mid-range, but for longer runs and/or a heavy-duty compressor, definitely go with 10 gauge.

You might be able to get away with flouting those rules for a while, but you would be putting unnecessary strain with a concomitant heat load on the machine--inevitably shortening its life.
that's good info!! thanks

most of my power tools are far from cheap, so i guess i could cough up an extra $50 for an extra 10 gauge cable and weed out the smaller ones.
my typical set up is 12" chop saw, 10" table saw, 2 1/4HP router, either my 2 hp compressor or the little guy, and of coarse the skill saw, sawzall, vac, and festool.
i got 2 100' 10 awg cables for long runs on new construction, but typically they stay coiled up and the smaller 50' ers come out....
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:22 PM   #11
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by world llc View Post
my typical set up is 12" chop saw, 10" table saw, 2 1/4HP router, either my 2 hp compressor or the little guy, and of coarse the skill saw, sawzall, vac, and festool.
And typically, you'd be running at most the vac and one of the others at the same time. If you stick with the recommendations above, you should never have to worry about being underpowered.

Unless you're plugged into a crappy 15A outlet at the end of a long run.
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:39 PM   #12
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


I have the Senco everyone is talking about. I used to this it was the quietest one until I saw/heard the Dewalt D55140.
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Old 04-10-2009, 01:32 AM   #13
 
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by JLTrim View Post
I'm a die-hard Rol Air fan and never hesitate to recommend them, I am currently using a 1.5 horse model like in the picture. It's not real quiet, but during regular use it only runs for 5 or 10 seconds at a time. They also have a 1 hp model that is quieter but takes longer to fill the tank, so it's a toss-up. If you do buy Rol-air, you can be sure that it's the last compressor you will have to buy for a LONG time.
you beat me to it.lol
ROLAIR is the way to go.best compressor i ever owned never own another.7 yrs strong never misses a beat
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Old 04-12-2009, 12:14 PM   #14
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


I've got a little rolair hotdog that's been used, abused, and put away wet. I'm amazed it still works!!
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Old 04-14-2009, 09:10 PM   #15
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


well... i went with the super midget dewalt and i am very pleased with it... it is even quieter than the biger brother, alot quieter! it feels lighter too, but i think it sais they are the same weight. we'll see how it holds up to the pain!
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Old 04-15-2009, 07:27 PM   #16
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


Quote:
Originally Posted by world llc View Post
well... i went with the super midget dewalt and i am very pleased with it... it is even quieter than the biger brother, alot quieter! it feels lighter too, but i think it sais they are the same weight. we'll see how it holds up to the pain!
Your new 1 gal. DeWalt is 6 lbs. lighter and 8 decibels quieter than your old 2 gal. You will enjoy the lighter/quieter model... but you might miss the dual ports.

I added a manifold and swivel lanyards to mine. You might like the pipe insulation padding I added to the roll cage. Padding is nice for the handle, but also for the part of the cage that hits the floor first when you set it down.
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Old 04-16-2009, 11:31 AM   #17
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


I didn't know DeWalt had a smaller model out, looks like it'd be great for trim work... I know I hated the larger model, worked with plenty of guys who had them but they were way too loud and heavy/bulky for my liking. Nice price tag on the smaller one, too. Like I've said I love the Rolair's but they are a little pricey and are sometimes hard to find locally... looks like you made a good choice, let us know how it holds up.
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Old 04-16-2009, 01:00 PM   #18
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


when i was in the market for a little trim compressor i read some where that the dewalt little one like basses was only rated for 2000 hrs of run time, that kinda threw me for a loop my old pancake lasted me 10+ yrs of countless full trimouts on new homes.

i ended up with a thomas t635 renegade which is rated at continous run..and with 12 sec recovery and low amp draw..its been good to me and fits on a shelf in the van.
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Old 05-02-2009, 08:01 AM   #19
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor


so whats the best hose lines to drag around from these minis?
The ones I have now from HD are too stiff and constantly curling up

Going to Dynamite later for a little comparison on a finish AC

Thanks for all the info Bass and others
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Old 05-02-2009, 08:35 AM   #20
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Re: Light And Quiet Trim Compressor





RIDGID OL25135(actually a Maxus X-Lite EX8017)
Supposedly a very limited-edition release by Ridgid to gauge demand.

Snagged it for $49 on clearance at Home Depot last year. It's aluminum, so it's super light (30 pounds) and no rusty tanks. Quiet too.

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