How To Be Like Mr. Closer - Marketing & Sales - Contractor Talk

How To Be Like Mr. Closer

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-29-2005, 03:02 PM   #1
Pro
 
Mike Finley's Avatar
 
Trade: Bathroom Remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Littleton, Colorado
Posts: 14,078
Rewards Points: 2,000

How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Excellent article in this months addition of Qualified Remodeler


By Patrick O’Toole

Quality Home Exteriors' Charles A. Naman personally sold $1.7 million in windows and siding last year. Good leads and a 57 percent closing ratio were key to that success.

Charles Naman at work in his Seattle office.
Quality Home Exteriors
www.qualityhomewindows.com

Charles Naman, 39, is not your average windows and siding salesman. After a 10-year career in sales and telemarketing, Naman launched his own Seattle-based company from the living room of his apartment in 1998. Then, taking a cue from past experience, he hired a telemarketing staff to generate leads and hired a separate sales staff to close them. But by 2003, he was back to being the sole sales representative for his company. The reason: Nobody he hired could keep up with his closing ratio and he felt like other sales reps would often "burn"good leads.

Last year, using very targeted lead sources along with a support staff of nine, Naman's Quality Home Exteriors topped $1.9 million in sales. To accomplish his level of sales, Naman set 487 appointments. He closed 203 sales. Fourteen canceled, leaving Quality Home Exteriors a total of 189 "net good" contracts. Of the rest of the 487 appointments, 93 were pitched and not sold; 45 appointments got "reset"; 82 were "no good" - the customer wanted only one or two new windows or wanted to replace glass; 45 were "dead" no presentation because they were not going to buy; and 19 were pitched and wanted to "call when they were ready." Qualified Remodeler spoke with Naman about his success.



Q: It sounds like you're a one man shop.

Liz Palmas, our controller, runs the company. My father Chuck came up from Southern California in 2003 and he does quality control. He runs the crews, making sure that they are all doing what they are supposed to do. I do all the sales and all the marketing and anything to do with the design of the ads.

Q: To get to the 189 "net good" contracts last year, how many people did you see?

I had a total of 487 appointments. That is roughly 40 per month or 10 per week. Subtracting the no-good appointments which I did not pitch, I figure that I had a closing ratio of 57 percent.

Q: The standard closing ratio for a good sales representative is 25 percent, to what do you attribute your success?

It is such a simple formula. First and foremost, I am always on time to the appointment. Second and most important is knowledge. I make a point of being well versed in my product and what my competitors offer. And lastly, when I go out and see a customer, I never shortchange them. I give every person a full presentation as though they have no knowledge of the window and its benefits. The knowledge that I have lets the prospect know they are dealing with a true professional. I tell sales reps when I hire them that enthusiasm is contagious. If you are enthusiastic and positive and knowledgeable, you are ahead of many other people. And I would say the final thing is that I don't do sales gimmicks. I don't do what other companies do.

There are a lot of companies, and I am thinking of one in particular, where they will price a job quite high and use a closing technique where they explain that they are a big commercial company as well as a residential company and that they have a big commercial job 100 miles away. They will say, "If you buy today, I can piggy-back that commercial job on your job and save you a lot of money." They offer large, unbelievable drops in price that appeal to people who can't say no to a good deal. I personally don't operate that way. I am very honest and straightforward about my price. I give them a fair price upfront, and then I give them an incentive to do business the day that I am there.

Q: And what is the incentive to do business the day that you are there?

I typically give them a 10 percent discount off my retail price if they buy the day I am there.

Q: How long does your presentation take to give?

Start to finish, about two hours. And sometimes you can be in there for three. But two and a half hours is normal. Another key is: If I do a presentation and sell them, I immediately go back to the office and send them a thank-you card. And if I don't sell them, I send them a thank-you card. I'll follow back up with a phone call within a week or a couple days if they ask me to.

Q: In rough percentages, where do your leads come from?

What we started noticing in 2002 is that some of our competitors got way more referrals than we did. In 2002, only 19 percent of our business was coming from referrals. So we decided to focus more heavily on referrals. And in 2003 our referral rate went from 19 to 22 or 23 percent.

Q: How did you do that?

There is a difference between a customer who is happy and someone who simply signs off on a job at the end of a day. We instituted a complete walk-through to check everything and to make sure each customer was 100 percent satisfied and thus more willing to refer their friends and neighbors. By doing that we noticed a big increase in our referrals.

In 2004, we decided to go a step further. We decided to increase our referral fee to customers from $200 to $500. If the contract was $5,000 or more, we will give you $500. If it is less than that, we will give you $250. People will not refer for money alone. Their reputation is on the line. We have to go do a very good job, and we have to be confident they would refer us.

Q: How did this compare with your other lead sources?

In 2004, over 32 percent of our business came from referrals, which equaled what we drew in from the Yellow Pages, which cost us $148,000, whereas referrals came out to be about $15,000. That is why in 2005 we did not renew with the Yellow Pages in 2005. We took a big leap. But at the same time we built a Web site at the end of 2004, beginning of 2005. We drive traffic to the Web site through Google and MSN and all those per-click types of arrangements. But we heavily started favoring the customer and believing that if we did a good job they would refer us. In 2005, currently 42 percent of our business is from customer referrals. The rest is the Web site, the direct mail, and we are a Puget Sound Energy (local electric utility) preferred contractor and they send out lists of preferred vendors for window replacement and we get leads by being on that list.

Q: Do you find your pace of selling and getting referrals tough?

I plan on getting another sales rep, but not until I can get a consistent lead source that's efficient enough for two guys to run full time. I don't want to waste the leads when I know that I can sell more of them.

Q: Can you do more sales than you currently do?

We did the math and I run an average of nine calls per week. Doing that I have had months where I have written $250,000 in one month. If I did not run a company, if all I did was run leads, if I had three leads a day, I could write $2.5 million in one year by myself. Who knows? Maybe I could do $3 million.

Q: What would your advice be to others on how to succeed the way you have?

First and foremost you need knowledge. Too many people go out there and just kind of wing it. They don't truly know their product inside and out. And if they do, they only know their product and they don't know their competitor's product.

I think that is my edge. I can tell a customer about any other window on the market. I know the top five companies that I run into on a consistent basis. I know who they sell for, what their habits are, what they sell their customers. I know their closing techniques. So the best thing that anybody can do is to know their product and their competition and then know how their competitors sell.

Q: How much of your success do you attribute to quality assurance?

It is a start-to-finish process. When a customer sees that you are on time, that you are enthusiastic and you are knowledgeable. They encounter is my front office staff who are very pleasant and knowledgeable. The next thing they see is an installer who comes out and is extremely knowledgeable. He does a complete measure. He walks through the whole job with the customer. They see a consistency. And fourth is the install which is consistent with everything else. If what the customer experiences from the initial visit to the final walk-through is consistent, they are going to be happy and they are going to refer people.

Q: How does this all play out for you in the future?

I want to keep consistent with what we are doing. I really want to focus on taking care of customers. I do a direct mail piece to real estate agents, 5,500 boxes per month and I do it twice a month. A well dressed upbeat person going door to door can be a good lead source. A good Web site is a great way to go. You really cannot underestimate the customer and how powerful they are - you don't know how many people they know. My goal is to build up a better lead generation and to hire more sales reps.

Q: What size company do you ultimately see running?

I don't think I would want to go over $4 or $5 million per year. I want to keep it lean and profitable. I want to be able to pay as much attention to the customer as I do now.


http://www.qualifiedremodeler.com/FE...-mr-closer.asp

What do I see as what is to be learned from him?

1. Do what you are good at, if you are good at sales go sell, if you are a good carpenter, hire a salesman to sell for you.

2. No your numbers. Naman can give you his closing ration as a percentage 57% which means he tracks his numbers.

3. Be on time.

4. Give everybody a full sales presentation, i.e. have a sales system in place and follow it every time.

5. Know your competition better than they know themselves.

6. Avoid sales gimicks.

7. Ask for the sale.

8. Have an incentive to buy today.

9. Above all else cultivate referals.

10. Top quality work is a requirement not an option, everything you do is springboarded from it.

11. Be enthusiastic about what you are doing, the enthusiasm is contagious with your customers.

#11 is a very powerful tool, I had forgetten how powerful it is, and this article brought that back for me. If I got nothing else out of it, just being reminded about the benefits of enthusiasm is enough to have made it worth my time reading this.
Mike Finley is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Mike Finley For This Useful Post:
oktex56 (11-21-2015)

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 09-29-2005, 05:43 PM   #2
Flooring Guru
 
Floorwizard's Avatar
 
Trade: Sales Manager
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Anchorage, AK
Posts: 2,794
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
#11 is a very powerful tool
It can't be taught either. You have to feel good, which takes me to #12: Self Esteem

Advertisement

__________________
------------------------
"in 20 years you will regret more what you did not do than what you did"
Floorwizard is offline  
Old 09-29-2005, 09:13 PM   #3
Custom Builder
 
Glasshousebltr's Avatar
 
Trade: From dirt to ridge vent
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: South Central Illinois
Posts: 4,406
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


13. Bring a gun.

Nothing like an enthusiastic a$$hole with a gun.

Bob
__________________
Bob
Glasshousebltr is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-30-2005, 07:06 AM   #4
Registered User
 
Grumpy's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofing and Gutter Specialist
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 8,573
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


He said he would follow up in a week kor ten days IF THEY ASK. Duh! Do it regardless if they ask or not! I sell more on the follow up than I do on the initial visit. I am not at 57%, but I was at 42% when I did only sales, and that includes any visit I made to any home owner, so I am sure I was higher if I cherry picked like that guy. Always always remember a lead is not dead until you see your competitor installing it. Even if the customer says they hired someone else if you drive by one day and see the same old roof or windows, CALL THEM IMMEDIATELY. I don't care if the lead is 3 years old, or they said never to call them again!

A high rate of cancellations is a sign of a high pressure salesman. I might get one cancellation per year. The reason being, my sales system is designed to build the customers trust and confidence. It also doesn't use ANY high pressure tactics.

Personally I don't like the "closers". I've never had a good experience with a closer working for my company. My sales system just isn't designed to work for "closers". I don't want my salesmen to spend 2+ hours with a customer.

I once hired a closer. He lasted only a few weeks. He sold nothing! The first sales call I went on with him, we spent 45 minutes with the customer and the customer was asking all about the windows and his response was "I'll tell you about that in a minute, oh these floors are nice, your coffee tastes so good." I believe in building raport with the customer but don't spend 45 minutes doing it and don't think you are in the customer's house for a social visit. They invited you over to sell them your product and services. It's a business call! After an hour and a half I had to excuse myself because I had to go to another meeting. At the end of the day he spent 3+ hours and no sale.

I also do not agree with giving a full presentation if you are presenting to only one or two people. Reason, you will bore the hell out of them. Instead KNOW the full presentation and learn how to read body language. Now give a sumamrized presentation and take queue's from the customer's body language when you need to go into greater detail. The only time I give a full presentaiton is when I am presenting to a group of people, perhaps an association. It's hard to zero in on what interests people when you have a group. 2 hours is just too long.

This guys main flaw is thinking he will ever find a salesman as good as he is. He's never going to. He's going to have to train that person himself. He's going to have to make the investment in good leads and his own time to mold that person into being as good as he is.

Overall I agree in most of what this guy said but something about his answers just irked me the wrong way.
__________________
-Grumpy
Chicago Gutters Chicago Roofing
Grumpy is offline  
Old 09-30-2005, 08:05 AM   #5
Pro
 
Nathan's Avatar
 
Trade: Founder of Contractor Talk
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 8,606
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


um... is that article copyrighted Mike?
__________________
Nathan
Nathan is offline  
Old 09-30-2005, 09:11 AM   #6
Pro
 
Mike Finley's Avatar
 
Trade: Bathroom Remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Littleton, Colorado
Posts: 14,078
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Sorry, I can't see a single flaw in a guy selling 57% of his leads, personally writing $1,700,000 worth of business, and getting 42% of his leads from referals AND running his company at the same time.

If you had 1/2 a guy like that on your payroll you could retire in 10 years.

He's got his craft high and tight.

Your comments are the same mentality as someone looking at $1,000,000 5 caret diamond and saying they don't like it because of a speck of dust they can see only with a microscope.
Mike Finley is offline  
Old 10-03-2005, 09:14 AM   #7
Registered User
 
Grumpy's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofing and Gutter Specialist
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 8,573
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


The flaw is he really isn't selling 57% if you re-compute the math you will see he is selling less. He is cherry picking and amplifying his number by dressing it up. "If you don't count this and don't count that."

Let's say he IS selling 57%, half a guy like that = 28% which is below the industry average of 33%. I don't see how I could retire.

You said he is running his company at the same time... Wait, didn't he say he hired an operations manager (office?) and he also said he hired his father for quality control (production)? Let's see, there is sales, operations, production... What else is there? Accounting.

I'm not even sure what your last comment meant because I have no idea if $1,000,000 is alot or a little for a 5 carrot diamond, but I assume you are saying I am too much of a perfectionist. If that is the case I take it as a compliment.
__________________
-Grumpy
Chicago Gutters Chicago Roofing
Grumpy is offline  
Old 10-03-2005, 03:21 PM   #8
Pro
 
Mike Finley's Avatar
 
Trade: Bathroom Remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Littleton, Colorado
Posts: 14,078
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy
I'm not even sure what your last comment meant because I have no idea if $1,000,000 is alot or a little for a 5 carrot diamond, but I assume you are saying I am too much of a perfectionist. If that is the case I take it as a compliment.
Nope, I'm saying that anything scrutinized mircroscopically can be picked apart.

You're missing the big picture by microscopically scrutinizing a few details.

No matter what you can find wrong with the guy, there's way more to find right about what he is doing, and he's doing more right than 95% of anybody here.
Mike Finley is offline  
Old 10-04-2005, 07:31 AM   #9
Registered User
 
Grumpy's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofing and Gutter Specialist
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 8,573
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


I'm not missing the big picture at all. I am just dressing it down where it was dressed up to show the real picture.

I do admit I envy his referral rate, but he also said HE PAYS FOR REFERRALS. You yourself have stated in the past you don't agree with this method. I'm not going to re-read the entire original thread but if I recall it was $250. Who wouldn't refer their contractor for $250, regardless if they were just moderately satisfied?
__________________
-Grumpy
Chicago Gutters Chicago Roofing
Grumpy is offline  
Old 10-04-2005, 10:01 AM   #10
Pro
 
Mike Finley's Avatar
 
Trade: Bathroom Remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Littleton, Colorado
Posts: 14,078
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
Originally Posted by Grumpy
Who wouldn't refer their contractor for $250, regardless if they were just moderately satisfied?
I don't agree with that at all, I say most people wouldn't.

Reread the part about

"In 2004, we decided to go a step further. We decided to increase our referral fee to customers from $200 to $500. If the contract was $5,000 or more, we will give you $500. If it is less than that, we will give you $250. People will not refer for money alone. Their reputation is on the line. We have to go do a very good job, and we have to be confident they would refer us. "

and this:

"It is a start-to-finish process. When a customer sees that you are on time, that you are enthusiastic and you are knowledgeable. They encounter is my front office staff who are very pleasant and knowledgeable. The next thing they see is an installer who comes out and is extremely knowledgeable. He does a complete measure. He walks through the whole job with the customer. They see a consistency. And fourth is the install which is consistent with everything else. If what the customer experiences from the initial visit to the final walk-through is consistent, they are going to be happy and they are going to refer people. "

Like I said 95% of everybody here isn't at this level, has never understood what it takes to get to that level, or if they do, doesn't have the commitment to actually do it.

There is a lot to take from this guy, but if it makes you feel better to nit pick him on microscopic points, then so be it. Personally, I'd rather take what is good from anything I see that can help me instead of dwelling on something that is irrelevant.

Last edited by Mike Finley; 10-04-2005 at 10:11 AM.
Mike Finley is offline  
Old 10-04-2005, 01:30 PM   #11
Registered User
 
Grumpy's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofing and Gutter Specialist
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 8,573
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


I don't think what I am nit picking is irrelevant at all. Sure As sated above I agree his referral rate but I think it's bogus how he got it. Sure at first glance his closing rate is impressive but it's bogus and inflated.

In addition I do not agree with his layered structure of business. Obviously it's working for him but his model mimicks a lean mean version of the big box structures like Home Depot.

I think what you can take away from my nitpicking is there are more than one way to skin a cat and I don't like the skinning knife this guy uses.

I think the only thing I have to learn from this guy is total customer satisfaction which has always been one of my goals anyways... BUT I wasn't given any specifics above as how to acheive that goal other than common sence that I think most people already know.
__________________
-Grumpy
Chicago Gutters Chicago Roofing
Grumpy is offline  
Old 10-08-2005, 10:09 PM   #12
Richard Kaller
 
Richard Kaller's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofing & Remodeling
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Philadelphia area
Posts: 30
Rewards Points: 25

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Grumpy,

Hope all is going well for you.

Interesting debate you are having with Mike but isn’t it all conjecture? I agree with Mike that the article is indeed impressive. However, the only way to tell if a business is financially successful is to benchmark financial statements. The article does not provide any supporting financial data.

Based on my experience working with contractors for over thirty years the article about Charles Namen makes sense. In my opinion we would be foolish to knock someone that has this level of success, especially based on a magazine article that lacks any financial detail.

According to the article it reads like he is working with extremely low overhead. His high closing ratio is typically that of a lower priced contractor, (maybe $300 - $500 a window) not a salesperson selling a high-quality window at 30% or double the price of the low-ball competition. Good chance the closing ratio is real.

His paying for referrals is not what I encourage, but I am starting to change my mind about that. We have members that are paying for leads. It works and it does in fact lower lead cost and cost of sales which is too high for many replacement window contractors. The payment works with all economic levels of people. When a contractor gets a “free” referral that is mainly by accident. To make referrals occur on purpose seems to require an incentive.

The referred lead, especially if the contractor is delivering what the consumer perceives as good quality at a lower price is a winning combination. Apparently Charles has figured this out. The fee he is paying is very small compared to the cost of leads and sales.

The $1.7 million is impressive. However, my question would be did he sell $2.2 million for $1.7???

We find that situation to be quite common.

We find contractors that are working their butts off chasing the high volume top line number, when they should be focused on the middle and bottom line numbers. With the "top line or ego model" the contractor is often making a decent living, but the company is barely making a profit. When working with a contractor like this we generally lower the top number and raise the bottom line, i.e., work smarter not harder. We usually quadruple profits in the first year.

The one man band model is also risky. That model can quickly fall apart if their owner/salesman has an accident or whatever and cannot produce at the current rate, i.e., that type of business almost never has a resale value.

Also if the company has been selling at a low cost the company faces the challenge of raising prices significantly in order to afford the additional marketing and sales costof another salesperson. This is where strategic planning and execution becomes the critical success factor so the company does not stall and start going backwards.

Just my 2 cents….Richard
__________________
Richard Kaller

Last edited by Richard Kaller; 10-08-2005 at 10:12 PM.
Richard Kaller is offline  
Old 10-09-2005, 02:09 PM   #13
Pro
 
JustaFramer's Avatar
 
Trade: Exiled For Life
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Lynnwood,WA
Posts: 3,292
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


For doing that much business I have never heard of him or his outfit.
My Mom used to telemarket for a windows and siding outfit. My Mom did close to a Mil is sales a year. I am not impressed . The company she worked for manufactured their own windows and seamless vinyl siding. It got the piont that she ran the room and made a percentage off all sales.

This guy paid to get in the magazine.

Last edited by JustaFramer; 10-09-2005 at 02:50 PM.
JustaFramer is offline  
Old 10-09-2005, 07:07 PM   #14
Pro
 
Mike Finley's Avatar
 
Trade: Bathroom Remodeling
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Littleton, Colorado
Posts: 14,078
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
Originally Posted by JustaFramer

This guy paid to get in the magazine.
I think you are right. The top 500 remodeling companies they just profiled and the other articles I suspect are also a scam and aren't real either. I think that actually none of the articles really exist at all, once you turn the page the former pages turn blank. It is probably them using some surplus CIA hallucinatory ink they bought left over from the Vietnam era.
Mike Finley is offline  
Old 10-09-2005, 07:11 PM   #15
Painting Contractor
 
Humble Abode's Avatar
 
Trade: Painting Contractor
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Posts: 1,176
Rewards Points: 500

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Finley
I think you are right. The top 500 remodeling companies they just profiled and the other articles I suspect are also a scam and aren't real either. I think that actually none of the articles really exist at all, once you turn the page the former pages turn blank. It is probably them using some surplus CIA hallucinatory ink they bought left over from the Vietnam era.

LOL

Seriously though if you get the magazine for free, all the articles are paid for. I noticed that the cover picture of American Painting Contractor magazine a few months back was the same as one of the full page adds in side and the cover article was written by a rep from the same company...

Graco also does a lot of writing for APC. It isn't hidden, anyone who is paying attention would notice.
__________________
Just because some of us can read and write and do a little math, that doesn't mean we deserve to conquer the Universe. Kurt Vonnegut, (1922 - 2007) from the Novel 'Hocus Pocus'
The NAPP
Milwaukee Painting Contractor
Humble Abode is offline  
Old 10-09-2005, 07:18 PM   #16
Member
 
The Yaz Man's Avatar
 
Trade: Restoration/Remodeler
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 58
Rewards Points: 75

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


I am a salesman first. I can sell anything. Once I get a lead I have closed on better than 90% of them this year right down the line. No bull. This pumps me because I was always afraid I was a salesman with no product. Or basically I sell but want nothing to do with producing with my own hands anymore. If a carpenter can get a salesman then a salesman can get a carpenter. Who wants to team up?
The Yaz Man is offline  
Old 10-09-2005, 07:34 PM   #17
Pro
 
JustaFramer's Avatar
 
Trade: Exiled For Life
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Lynnwood,WA
Posts: 3,292
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Finley
I think you are right. The top 500 remodeling companies they just profiled and the other articles I suspect are also a scam and aren't real either. I think that actually none of the articles really exist at all, once you turn the page the former pages turn blank. It is probably them using some surplus CIA hallucinatory ink they bought left over from the Vietnam era.

Mike you posted article about a contractor from my area. Guys doing that kind of work have some local recognition. Like I said I never heard of him. But remember their is alot of money in this state. And his 1.7 mil is impressive it is not that much money compared to the other construction companies around here. That's all.

What's with the conspiracy theory? The S&B post was a joke.
JustaFramer is offline  
Old 11-13-2015, 09:01 AM   #18
New Guy
 
JoeGabbit's Avatar
 
Trade: Roofer
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 6
Rewards Points: 14

Re: How To Be Like Mr. Closer


want a job?

Advertisement

JoeGabbit is offline  


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what do you think? JustRightCo Remodeling Picture Post 17 08-28-2009 07:31 PM
Referral Program, one step closer Mike Finley Marketing & Sales 11 07-03-2009 11:01 AM
Come out swinging woodmagman Marketing & Sales 32 03-11-2007 01:23 PM
Finding a Taper Rambone Drywall 9 04-28-2006 06:36 PM

Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?