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Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?

 
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Old 07-11-2015, 04:20 PM   #21
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by rrk View Post
Servepro will place a few $1000 a day dehumidifiers in the house, and may recommend all drywall and insulation be removed.
I don't know how to stop these people.

Explaining Zero Risk Bias to the HO won't work. And if the problem goes away, it might well have gone away on it's own, but
"Post hoc ergo propter hoc (Latin: "after this, therefore because of this") is a logical fallacy (of the questionable cause variety) that states "Since event Y [problem gone] followed event X [Servpro came] , event Y must have been caused by event X."
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Old 07-11-2015, 04:28 PM   #22
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


I'll be there on Monday when doing the tests to find out what's going on. Homeowners called them for some reason. Roof was in such bad shape that homeowners insurance made them replace it.
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Old 07-11-2015, 04:44 PM   #23
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by BamBamm5144 View Post
They are having servpro come out to do a moisture test next week.
AKA gives it some time to dry out and moisture to disperse. Seems like a prudent thing to do, in this case.

1. Plaster absorbs water/moisture with minimal damage, compared to drywall. It's a 'cement'.

2. Water especially over time can cause the wood lath to loosen. To the framing and physical bond to plaster caused by swelling.

3. Short term water loading tends to expose weaknesses that have developed over time. This case 100 years of a house living and breathing - moving expanding contracting.

Compared to drywall a water leak like this is 'generally' not anything I'd worry much about. Worse case is demo the plaster and hang new drywall, or skim plaster over blue board. A few thousand out of pocket or a possibly a few thousand in increased premiums.
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Old 07-11-2015, 09:47 PM   #24
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by Dave in Pa View Post

So, why Is Servpro coming out next week?
Some companies will wait to come out, hoping mold will grow - then they get to do remediation. I saw one company say they were going to send all kinds of people right away after a fire, then do basically nothing. Foot dragging can bump the size of the job. They got fired.

I can look at the top side of probably any old plaster ceiling in this area and see where mold grew on it at some point without a roof leak...
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Old 07-11-2015, 09:54 PM   #25
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Compared to drywall a water leak like this is 'generally' not anything I'd worry much about. Worse case is demo the plaster and hang new drywall, or skim plaster over blue board. A few thousand out of pocket or a possibly a few thousand in increased premiums.
I've done that for a lot less than a few thousand - closer to a few hundred. From what he described, I'd guess it's maybe an 8X8' area, but you never know until you evaluate the plaster.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:21 PM   #26
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


The water came in directly over the bucket, no where else.

The issue is the entire ceiling has been in need of repair/replacement and there have obviously been moisture issues before we ever snowed up as you can see by the old discoloration.

I don't know how it would be possible for that little amount of water to cause thousands worth in damages.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:31 PM   #27
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


They are on the take . they have a rough old ceilings and want to turn this into new ones.

There is no compromise of the structure, that' s ridiculous .

I hate you are dealing with this, its wrong.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:38 PM   #28
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


It's not a big deal, I'm not concerned. The homeowners as I've mentioned have been reasonable. I believe if they didn't contact their insurance company first, they wouldn't be concerned about it at all.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:42 PM   #29
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


Good deal...and that's a good rule for handling complaints..its no big deal ...no matter what it is , you have skill, tools and insurance .

I feel like a lot of t.v. shows ,etc arm customers a little too dangerously these days . Good Luck and don't stress...I have a roof , the entire roof , off a house right now .
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Old 07-12-2015, 12:22 PM   #30
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


Quote:
Originally Posted by BamBamm5144 View Post
The water came in directly over the bucket, no where else.

The issue is the entire ceiling has been in need of repair/replacement and there have obviously been moisture issues before we ever snowed up as you can see by the old discoloration.

I don't know how it would be possible for that little amount of water to cause thousands worth in damages.
I worked for one of those restoration companies for awhile. Not sure if what they told me was true or they gave me the same information to ensure I didn't tell the home owner what was really going on.

So take what I'm saying with a grain of salt. I have reasons to do so.

Anyways, what they said was that the insulation would absorb water and what water leaked through the ceiling would only be a small amount of the real amount of water up there.

I don't know if it's true but all I know is that I handled a ton of wet insulation in places that only had a small leak visible.
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Old 07-12-2015, 12:57 PM   #31
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


House is a little over 100 years old, I'm not too sure how much "insulation" there would be.

I do know that if those guys find something, I will have to involve my liability insurance and I'm sure my liability insurance won't find anything. There's nothing really to find.
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Old 07-12-2015, 01:03 PM   #32
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by BamBamm5144 View Post
House is a little over 100 years old, I'm not too sure how much "insulation" there would be.

I do know that if those guys find something, I will have to involve my liability insurance and I'm sure my liability insurance won't find anything. There's nothing really to find.
You know how many times I've heard that? The response usually was we have to tear some out in order to make sure.
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Old 07-12-2015, 01:12 PM   #33
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by BucketofSteam View Post
the insulation would absorb water and what water leaked through the ceiling would only be a small amount of the real amount of water up there.
Sounds reasonable.
Making small ceiling holes to probe the insul with a meter in a radius around the leak hole may confirm or disprove this.
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:10 PM   #34
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by hdavis View Post
I've done that for a lot less than a few thousand - closer to a few hundred. From what he described, I'd guess it's maybe an 8X8' area, but you never know until you evaluate the plaster.


Sure you can 'Patch it for a couple hundred .... bet good money the plaster ain't solid enough far far away from that 8x8 area for a true repair. Chased a lot of loose plaster up in Bamm's area ... Has all the red flags the entire ceiling needs to be suspect, think worse case, until you can know for sure.
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:15 PM   #35
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by BamBamm5144 View Post
House is a little over 100 years old, I'm not too sure how much "insulation" there would be.
I'd be more worried about hardwood floors buckling on the floor above than insulation ... if there is typical flooring above on the second floor.
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:36 PM   #36
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Originally Posted by Texas Wax View Post
I'd be more worried about hardwood floors buckling on the floor above than insulation ... if there is typical flooring above on the second floor.
GOOD point, I missed that on the first time here, but it was stated that there is a second floor. So if the roof was the issue to cause the leak, then water flows down-hill in most cases. Was the second floor damaged, or show anything????

As stated, in 100 year old house, the chance of insulation is slim to nothing, BUT look for the drill holes inside and outside for blown-in insulation.

Keep us up to date please!
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Old 07-12-2015, 02:55 PM   #37
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


My experience is that ServePro and the like are expensive (all that overhead) but reasonable, not spreading panic or fear about mold, structural problems, or any of that.
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Old 07-12-2015, 03:00 PM   #38
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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My experience is that ServePro and the like are expensive (all that overhead) but reasonable, not spreading panic or fear about mold, structural problems, or any of that.
Are they franchised or a national company? The ones I have seen working here are terrible. In one instance they informed homeowner toxic waste water was leaking when in fact it was fresh water from the Lav supply.
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Old 07-12-2015, 03:10 PM   #39
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


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Are they franchised or a national company? The ones I have seen working here are terrible. In one instance they informed homeowner toxic waste water was leaking when in fact it was fresh water from the Lav supply.
I think that ServPro and ServiceMaster, both of whom are present here, are franchise deals. I'm sure that some of them will escalate if they can, and it probably makes sense to be present when they do their diagnosis. My experience has been fine.
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Old 07-12-2015, 03:44 PM   #40
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Re: Tolerable Wood Moisture Levels?


I work for a National franchise, restoration company, LOCAL owner, who is NOT afraid to give his personal cell number out!

And NO I don't work for any of the above companies! lol
(can not/nor say anything bad!)

THEY are not all the same from location to location!

We have 8 cars/trucks on the road 5 days a week, then more on the week-end.
We are trained in mold, water, sewage, etc. cost there!
We are on call 24/7 INCLUDING holidays, ever go out on Christmas Day for work.
We have a million dollars worth of equipment to work with and maintain, do you?
We leave work at 4pm, get called out at 5pm, work till 2am do you? and be back to
work at 7am.
Things are not cheap to operate as WE ALL KNOW!!

Some companies are good, some are BAD, so just please don't put all in the same list here!

I do love my work, some days are a slice of pie, some are full of chit!!

Sorry just needed to give my opinion here!

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