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Portable Job Site Heat

 
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Old 12-08-2016, 03:59 PM   #1
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Portable Job Site Heat


I will be starting a renovation here in upstate ny in January. I'd like to get my guys and I some portable heat to help keep the chill out of the air and hopefully allow us to not have to work in huge carhartt jackets. I was thinking a propane convection heater 50/60/80k btu in the middle of the room would help a lot but I was wondering what you all use and recommend. I'd rather stay away from kerosene but if it's cheaper to run than propane I'd go with it. Any advice is greatly appreciated!

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Old 12-08-2016, 04:59 PM   #2
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


I prefer electric, if possible. Kerosene next, due to cost. Propane last.

Kerosene and propane put a lot of moisture into the air, so all the wood is a little wet - it's a good setup for nail pops, trim gaps, etc.

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Old 12-08-2016, 05:03 PM   #3
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


Just looking for something to get me through until hvac is in, then I'll have that for all the finish work

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Old 12-08-2016, 05:09 PM   #4
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


I did these renovations for 10 years. The furnace guy was always the last one to show up . Makes sense you wouldn't want all that construction dust getting sucked into a new system. No matter what you do certain areas are going to stay cold...you won't notice it while your're working ....it shows up years later as arthritis
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Old 12-08-2016, 06:32 PM   #5
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


IMHO,electric is the only way to go.No nauseating headache producing fumes,no tanks to monitor and fill. Not to mention,the fuels dump many pounds of water into the job site,while one is trying to dry stuff out and acclimatize the place for trim. Also,the fuels are a huge no no for the placement of fresh concrete,effects it adversely.
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Old 12-08-2016, 08:00 PM   #6
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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Originally Posted by fjn View Post
IMHO,electric is the only way to go.No nauseating headache producing fumes,no tanks to monitor and fill. Not to mention,the fuels dump many pounds of water into the job site,while one is trying to dry stuff out and acclimatize the place for trim. Also,the fuels are a huge no no for the placement of fresh concrete,effects it adversely.
We've always used kerosene space heaters in our "gas chambers" ....wouldnt recommend it to anyone.
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Old 12-08-2016, 08:05 PM   #7
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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IMHO,electric is the only way to go.No nauseating headache producing fumes,no tanks to monitor and fill. Not to mention,the fuels dump many pounds of water into the job site,while one is trying to dry stuff out and acclimatize the place for trim. Also,the fuels are a huge no no for the placement of fresh concrete,effects it adversely.
I never knew there would be a problem with concrete slabs and kerosene heaters til last year (seems I'm always last to arrive to the party "

What does it do?

The owner at the concrete plant was telling me horror stories about this last year...but he never explained why.
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Old 12-08-2016, 09:15 PM   #8
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


40 years ago when first married, in winter months i tended for a masonry crew. they always ran propane fired heaters in the shelters.

they always said kerosene was a no no
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:34 PM   #9
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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What does it do?
I'm guessing it affects the compressive strength or the curing, but I don't know.

These guys below poured kerosene in the sand, then mixed the concrete. Not sure what happens when you spill it on fresh concrete that is already set.

https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ure_conditions
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Old 12-09-2016, 01:27 AM   #10
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


indirect fired heater ducted into the house
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Old 12-09-2016, 06:41 AM   #11
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


If you can go electric, do that. Propane dumps a ton of moisture into the house. Kerosene has an odor that makes me sick.

I have seen a few guys use an old furnace and temporarily hook it up. I just don't have an old furnace to use.
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Old 12-09-2016, 08:24 AM   #12
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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Originally Posted by hdavis View Post
I prefer electric, if possible. Kerosene next, due to cost. Propane last.

Kerosene and propane put a lot of moisture into the air, so all the wood is a little wet - it's a good setup for nail pops, trim gaps, etc.
If it isn't an exhausted kerosene heater I feel like hurling by lunch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishslave View Post
I did these renovations for 10 years. The furnace guy was always the last one to show up . Makes sense you wouldn't want all that construction dust getting sucked into a new system. No matter what you do certain areas are going to stay cold...you won't notice it while your're working ....it shows up years later as arthritis
It's SOP here to get the furnace online right away during the winter months, we need something to keep the footers warm and then heat the house for drywall. Before the house changes hands a duct cleaning company comes in and blows out the dust.
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Old 12-09-2016, 01:35 PM   #13
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


When I was in Japan years ago everyone used kerosene heaters indoors and would just open a window once everyone started getting woozy.

It doesn't get super cold here in the PacNW but I see a lot of towable external heating units ducted into commercial job sites.

We used some propane heaters in a few houses that had been framed really slowly in constant rain on a slab. The supervisor said even with the moisture from the heater, we were drying things out.

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Old 12-09-2016, 06:45 PM   #14
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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What does it do?

.


John; The carbon dioxide will combine with the calcium carbonate on the surface.When this occurs,the floor surface will dust under traffic.For this reason,the carbon dioxide producing heaters should not be used near fresh concrete.
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Old 12-13-2016, 07:06 PM   #15
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


as inefficient as it may sound, a big generator with portable heaters run through extension cords if you dont have on site power. A tad bit on the noisy side of course, but you dont have fumes running into the home. 1500 watts is generally adequate for warming up 300 sq feet. A medium duty 3500 watt would be adequate to heat up a two rooms, 3 if you only operate them on low.
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Old 12-14-2016, 06:43 PM   #16
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


GC put these on each floor. It got worm within the space of an hour. In two hours we took jackets off.
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Old 12-14-2016, 07:25 PM   #17
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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GC put these on each floor. It got worm within the space of an hour. In two hours we took jackets off.



Now your talking,no noxious fumes to contend with. Also,an added advantage of electric heat, most of the time the electric bill is in the property owners name,no money to dispute over.
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Old 12-14-2016, 07:48 PM   #18
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishslave View Post
I did these renovations for 10 years. The furnace guy was always the last one to show up . Makes sense you wouldn't want all that construction dust getting sucked into a new system. No matter what you do certain areas are going to stay cold...you won't notice it while your're working ....it shows up years later as arthritis
There's a common sense practice to taking care of a heat pump during construction on a new home.

BUT! Common sense Is a rare thing these days! And that's why the HAVC Guys won't Warrant the system being run during construction .

Everyone wants to blame It on the drywall dust .. I've always shut the heat off during sanding ..Then cut It back on after the house was shop vac and completed . [common sense] But the biggest culprit! winter or summer is the floor sanders ! Any Central air guy will tell you that !
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Old 12-25-2016, 10:02 PM   #19
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


I found that a kerosene heater using new ultra low sulfer diesel with about a 10% mix of 90+ % Isopropal alcohol added burns clean and not near as many headaches as kerosene....cheaper too. less then 1/2 the $

However electric is the way to go if you can but sometimes its not feasable
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Old 12-25-2016, 11:31 PM   #20
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Re: Portable Job Site Heat


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