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My Future

 
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:08 AM   #41
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Re: My Future


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And the 2000 hours of work experience you need per block of school you have to do? Signed off by a red sealed carpenter. Just to put that into perspective, that's 40 hours/week for 50 weeks.
its fast tracked
so i get my level one in 1 semester..
im going to see if i can write a test and depending on how i do on it, progress further.. as in be in 2nd year or whatever
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:12 AM   #42
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Re: My Future


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Screw all the advice you have received on this thread Nick. If you are able, get an education at university. Then,if you still want to build things, persue that goal. Easier to continue your educaion now than to pick it back up later.
i know all too many people that do that,
i know people to who just feel obligated to go to uni, get nothing out of it but just feel obligated to go.
I have no interest in being one of those people. Why would i stop doing what i want to do, in exchange for another 4 years of hell. I would just be another brick in the wall, another person with a degree that means nothing
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:49 AM   #43
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Re: My Future


About all you need is to know how to manage your money and make business decisions, and develop you carpentry skills. Nobody NEEDS college for that. That 50 weeks of 40hr weeks could just as easily be done in 6 months working 12hr X 7 days week if you can find the work. It's a lot easier to do this when you're young than when you're old. Just don't fall into the trap of working 40 and doing nothing else to further yourself.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:37 AM   #44
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Re: My Future


I agree, you don't need school. The business side of construction is rather simple. It depends on the type of person you are.
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Old 10-16-2012, 11:05 AM   #45
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Re: My Future


i wouldnt have traded going to college for anything. it was the most fun 5 years of my life, and i learned a lot about law, business, and commercial and road construction. it helps in the business end of things. esp AIA documents on larger development jobs.
having said that, its not really necessary for residential construction, nut i would take a few classes if you can. contracts are the biggest problem it seems, so taking a business law and a contract law class seems like it would be worth it 10 fold.
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Old 10-16-2012, 03:35 PM   #46
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Re: My Future


There is one big reason that I wish that I had attended a major college.

The most attractive girls will always go to a 4 year school.
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Old 10-16-2012, 03:38 PM   #47
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Re: My Future


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Originally Posted by kcremodeling
There is one big reason that I wish that I had attended a major college.

The most attractive girls will always go to a 4 year school.
Chicks, beer bongs and parties. That would be my motivator for college. I can hire an attorney in less than 15 minutes.
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Old 10-16-2012, 04:24 PM   #48
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Re: My Future


Make some memories. That is what life is about. And remember you can screw up alot between 18 and 22 without major consiquences.

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Old 10-16-2012, 04:41 PM   #49
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Re: My Future


my advice to you Nick is to work for a few people before you venture out on your own.
I was very fortunate to work with some ace builders in my time and am very appreciative of all the things that i learned from them. The most important thing you will need to learn is efficiency (don't learn this one on your dime). Logistics especially in framing is half the battle when it comes to your bottom line$.
Work for other people and keep your eyes wide open keep a log on what you and your crews did or did not get done and why, we don't want you back here in two years with "how much" questions
A great example is having someone (employer) pay you to learn how to operate a peti-bone (lift/whatever you canadians call it??) Being able to to set packages exactly where and when they need to go for YOUR EMPLOYEES is priceless

Good luck and learn to like pain
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Old 10-16-2012, 05:52 PM   #50
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Re: My Future


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Make some memories. That is what life is about. And remember you can screw up alot between 18 and 22 without major consiquences.

*****Work to live not live to work******
it seems i do live to work, because i don't do anything else... when im not working. im getting in trouble or not doing anything..
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:11 PM   #51
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Re: My Future


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i know all too many people that do that,
i know people to who just feel obligated to go to uni, get nothing out of it but just feel obligated to go.
I have no interest in being one of those people. Why would i stop doing what i want to do, in exchange for another 4 years of hell. I would just be another brick in the wall, another person with a degree that means nothing
I won't pretend that college is right for everyone, because it's not. If you really consider school to be hell, then maybe it's not right for you.

High school was miserable for me, but college was awesome. The only things about it that were unpleasant was the pretext that I had to find a job, or some way to make money from my degree. Screw that. Keep learning after high school. Seriously. It's not enough to just learn the trades.

Be Brainy. It's worth it. I studied guitar, singing, literature, writing, history, German, anthropology, etc. I spent five years in college, and I ended up with an associates degree in liberal studies. But I only took two or three classes I didn't want to take.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:15 PM   #52
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Re: My Future


You have a good 50 years to be a carpenter. You only have a few more years to be a young guy in college. You will never get the same experience, if you decide to go to college later. I'm serious. Even if you just do one semester and then drop out, it's worth it.

I learned so much about myself and the world in college, I wouldn't trade those years for anything.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:17 PM   #53
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Re: My Future


I worked for a large production home builder for almost three years after graduating from a construction management program. I had worked in construction in varying capacities before that. I managed the construction of a lot of houses during those few years. I made A LOT of rookie mistakes in that job and learned many valuable lessons...all on someone else's checkbook.

I started my company when I was 25. I have had very few costly mistakes on my own. My point is, take the time to go around the block a few times. It doesn't have to be forever. As many of us know, working for someone else is a drag, but you can learn a lot (both how to & how not to) and meet some good contacts along the way. It will pay dividends in your future.

One more thing, you can't learn everything from a book. Real world experience is undoubtedly the best learning tool. I spent four years and a lot of money to go to college. I gained a good base for what I am doing now, but there is no substitute for the real thing. Keep up the good work. From the looks of it, you have a bright future.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:34 PM   #54
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Re: My Future


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Originally Posted by Oconomowoc View Post
I agree, you don't need school.
I'm surprised to see you say that, Mike.

It's true that with some good sense and native ability, coupled with get-up-and-go, one can usually survive fairly comfortably. But extra schooling increases your options so dramatically that I think it's a no-brainer if you can afford it.

One of the biggest things that schooling provides is learning how to learn. How to solve problems. How to find resources. That's why employers favor job applicants with higher education--regardless of their major. It's not just about learning how to put Peg A into Hole B; monkeys can be trained to do that.

A good percentage of college graduates do not work in the field they went to school for. But on average, they enjoy a significantly higher standard of living than those who only finished high school.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:37 PM   #55
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Re: My Future


my $0.02

I agreee with most people here. Work for others for a few years before you go on your own. I've known 3 or 4 people that have gone out on their own after a couple years working for one guy. They haven't lasted. The others I've known (including myself) that have worked for a lot of different people and have many different building experiences have lasted.

I also think that if you can, go to university, but it's not for everyone. I was 1.5 months in when I realised one day that i hadn't heard anything the prof had said for the last 1/2 hr because i was wondering if it had gotten sunny outside?, and if it had, what kind of clouds there were?. hmmm i wonder if the birds have started flying south yet? Fishing is fun. I bet some big fat late season bass would be biting on a nice warm day. Hey you know what goes good with fishing...drinking beer. Oh is that guy still talking? i wonder what he's talking about. And that was a class I liked. I could barely sit through a 50 minute highschool class let alone a 3 hr lecture.

So go to Uni if you can deal with it but I kind of think you'd go stir crazy.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:53 PM   #56
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Re: My Future


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Originally Posted by Tinstaafl

I'm surprised to see you say that, Mike.

It's true that with some good sense and native ability, coupled with get-up-and-go, one can usually survive fairly comfortably. But extra schooling increases your options so dramatically that I think it's a no-brainer if you can afford it.

One of the biggest things that schooling provides is learning how to learn. How to solve problems. How to find resources. That's why employers favor job applicants with higher education--regardless of their major. It's not just about learning how to put Peg A into Hole B; monkeys can be trained to do that.

A good percentage of college graduates do not work in the field they went to school for. But on average, they enjoy a significantly higher standard of living than those who only finished high school.
I'm not against school, in fact I'm very much for it. But like I said, you don't NEED it.

I agree with what you are saying though, I wish I would've went to college. Pretty sure I would of loaded up on finance classes and economics because I enjoy that.

I don't know, I certainty don't have the answers. What I do know is a person should WANT to go to school. If that's the case then there's not much to discuss here.

Is school a waste of money? No, I don't think so. The culture and experience alone are pretty cool I would imagine. I'm pretty educated myself, what I mean is I read heavily and daily. That's surely tough with kids, wife and a business.

I actually did go to college for one year, I don't talk about it much though. I drank myself out of a full ride all paid for. I regret it also. School was easy for me except for english and composition, that was difficult for me. I had my first business when I was in college and I didn't look at it as an opportunity. It was stupid, I was stupid.

But this is construction and if that's your dream I'd get busy living it NOW! Unfortunately those dreams might change so yeah, school is a good thing.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:57 PM   #57
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Re: My Future


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What I do know is a person should WANT to go to school.
High five on that. Only problem is, usually the light doesn't dawn until long after you opted not to go.
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:06 PM   #58
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Re: My Future


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Originally Posted by kcremodeling View Post
There is one big reason that I wish that I had attended a major college.

The most attractive girls will always go to a 4 year school.
The best years of my life were university and college. Enough money to get drunk but not enough to invest in responsible things.

I couldn't imagine not going to post secondary education...the parties were fantastic.
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:13 PM   #59
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Re: My Future


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High five on that. Only problem is, usually the light doesn't dawn until long after you opted not to go.
That's soo true. Looking back life seems so incredibly short. Sometimes experience can be painful. I remember my Dad just shaking his head at me. He was right. I should of kicked my own azz!
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Old 10-16-2012, 07:30 PM   #60
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Re: My Future


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i know all too many people that do that,
i know people to who just feel obligated to go to uni, get nothing out of it but just feel obligated to go.
I have no interest in being one of those people. Why would i stop doing what i want to do, in exchange for another 4 years of hell. I would just be another brick in the wall, another person with a degree that means nothing
You shouldn't feel obligated to get a degree someone suggests you get. With as smart and hungry as you are......you should feel obligated to get yourself a degree that will make you a better home builder than the guy trying to bid lower than you. Work in framing and study architeture or something related to your long term goals......don't waste a chance to be able to put yourself above the next guy. Skills don't pay bills, knowledge does.

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