Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now - Page 2 - General Discussion - Contractor Talk

Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-01-2008, 09:05 AM   #21
New Guy
 
mtm's Avatar
 
Trade: framing
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Nashville Tn
Posts: 26
Rewards Points: 25

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Mac, Hoping the good karma comes back to you ten fold.
mtm is offline  

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 11-01-2008, 09:37 AM   #22
Preserving the Past
 
Jason Whipple's Avatar
 
Trade: Restoration & Historic Preservation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,571
Rewards Points: 2,060

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Nice thing to get involved with Mac. Good job!
__________________
Jason E Whipple, General Manager
Historic House Restoration, Cincinnati, Ohio
Facebook | Twitter
Jason Whipple is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 11:03 AM   #23
Pro
 
J F's Avatar
 
Trade: Carpenter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: North of Atlanta
Posts: 9,058
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


what everyone else said...

J
J F is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-01-2008, 11:23 AM   #24
Pro
 
Bodger's Avatar
 
Trade: GC
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,522
Rewards Points: 2,024

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stone Mountain View Post
Impressive work for a good cause.
Tell me: what slope are you allowed to have. Here in Toronto we have to have a fall of 1" in 12". I've quoted sevral wheelchair ramps in the last few onths, but they've all backed out when they find out how long it has to be.
We had one person whose door was 5 feet above grade, which would have required a 60' long ramp.
Believe it or not, the municipality turned down the permit.
I had a similar prob on a commercial job last year, 4 foot elevation from grade to landing at door, ADA requirement 1:12 slope. On that job, I had enough space to do a series of ramps and landings so I could sort of wind my way up to the last landing after a series of switchbacks. It was the only way, I didn't have room for a straight out 48 foot ramp plus the required landing at the door. pricey piece of business and a lot of headache with the building department but it had to be done. It was the only way out of the back door of the commercial space, and the powers that be frown on having only steps at one of two egresses.

Last edited by Bodger; 11-01-2008 at 11:27 AM.
Bodger is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 11:42 AM   #25
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stone Mountain View Post
Tell me: what slope are you allowed to have. Here in Toronto we have to have a fall of 1" in 12".
Yup, min. is 1 in 12 here too. The tallest ramp I've ever built was only 30" - 30' long. It had an L-shape with a 5'x5' landing at the turn. 60' ramp...buncha switchbacks? That would still eat up a ton of real estate in the front yard though... a electric lift would make more sense in that scenario.

I appreciate the kudos, guys - what I wanted to do with this thread was plant the seed for expanding this nationwide. A wheelchair ramp really is just a simple 1-day project...but a night and day difference to someone in one.

If you guys are interested, I can either PM you logistical info...or write it up in this thread.

I've heard a hell of a lot of rhetoric over the past year (presidential and local elections) - I say we, the people, help the people in the way we can. Waitin' and hopin' on the guv'mint is the wrong tactic. This is something solid that we, as builders, are more than capable of doing.

I really don't want to get on a soapbox but here I am! You can do something like this in your town, I'll give you all the knowledge I have on the subject.

How cool would this be - 1 year from now, posting a thread w/ pics of ramps that have been built based off this idea. How many people could we help?

Mac
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 11:55 AM   #26
Pro
 
davitk's Avatar
 
Trade: Perfessional Contracter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Frozen North
Posts: 910
Rewards Points: 502

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Very nice, Mac. What about that Skid-Guard plywood? I haven't heard of it.
davitk is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 12:28 PM   #27
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by davitk View Post
Very nice, Mac. What about that Skid-Guard plywood? I haven't heard of it.
Found the panels in WA state, though this link is a company in Chicago:
http://www.greatnorthernlumber.com/simpskidg.html

This is similar stuff, haven't used it yet:
http://www.greatnorthernlumber.com/simptuft.html

Here's some info on the company that produces the panels:
http://www.reedconstructiondata.com/companies/10182/

Panels run a little over $100 ea. so this would be where a lumberyard's donation would come in handy!
I'm finding the structural framing and handrail packages run between $750 and $1,000 (not including plywood) and I know you could build a cheaper handrail system (using all pt, horizontal, not vertical, 2x spaced wider than 4", smaller or no cap rail, etc) if necessary.

Mac
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 02:44 PM   #28
Pro
 
gtmstang's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling contractor
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Pikeville, TN
Posts: 105
Rewards Points: 75

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Nice work. Stand on the soapbox and be proud. 1 day out of your life but it probably meant the world to person who needed the ramp.
gtmstang is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 02:58 PM   #29
Pro
 
Bodger's Avatar
 
Trade: GC
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 2,522
Rewards Points: 2,024

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


I for one would be willing to get involved in this and try to get some of my contractor friends on board as well out here in the LA area. It sounds like everybody wins, and it would be a welcome change from the daily grind of chasing the profit margin. And considering what it would mean to someone in genuine need, it seems the least I can do since I have the capability to build something like this. This is a whole new dimension to the satisfied client concept, I don't often get to change someone's life with my carpentry skills.
So how do we get this rolling?
Bodger is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 04:26 PM   #30
Pro
 
Snobnd's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling 30+ yrs
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 4,466
Rewards Points: 4,336

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Great work Mac and for a good cause!

Im sure the smile on the kid was worth more then anything.
Snobnd is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 05:36 PM   #31
Pro
 
Bone Saw's Avatar
 
Trade: decks
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,831
Rewards Points: 2,076

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Class act Mac, I'm proud of you
Bone Saw is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 06:10 PM   #32
Sean
 
SLSTech's Avatar
 
Trade: Principal / Owner
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Naperville, IL
Posts: 5,408
Rewards Points: 126

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by BuiltByMAC View Post
Yup, min. is 1 in 12 here too. The tallest ramp I've ever built was only 30" - 30' long. It had an L-shape with a 5'x5' landing at the turn. 60' ramp...buncha switchbacks? That would still eat up a ton of real estate in the front yard though... a electric lift would make more sense in that scenario.

I appreciate the kudos, guys - what I wanted to do with this thread was plant the seed for expanding this nationwide. A wheelchair ramp really is just a simple 1-day project...but a night and day difference to someone in one.

If you guys are interested, I can either PM you logistical info...or write it up in this thread.

I've heard a hell of a lot of rhetoric over the past year (presidential and local elections) - I say we, the people, help the people in the way we can. Waitin' and hopin' on the guv'mint is the wrong tactic. This is something solid that we, as builders, are more than capable of doing.

I really don't want to get on a soapbox but here I am! You can do something like this in your town, I'll give you all the knowledge I have on the subject.

How cool would this be - 1 year from now, posting a thread w/ pics of ramps that have been built based off this idea. How many people could we help?

Mac
Dittos with all the other posters & count me in.

I think you should post it, for those that don't have 15 posts & everyone will know where the info is.

Couple of quick points - Federal ADA is max of 1" per 12" - some people may require ramps that are not that steep. Also as I recall, if the ramp is longer than 25' you must have a landing per the guidelines. Not everyone has an electric chair & occasionally they break.

Once again - awesome job Mac
__________________
SLS Construction & Building Solutions LLC Our Blog - The HTRC
SLSTech is online now  
Old 11-01-2008, 08:56 PM   #33
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


I’ll break it into sections -

Getting started

First, if you belong to an HBA or similar builder’s association, you’ll be way ahead of the curve. You won’t need to reinvent the wheel.
If you’re not a member, at least consider the possibility. Not only is it a good networking tool, your membership dues will indirectly help you too. One of the HBA’s main purposes is to act as a political force, giving builders a stronger, united voice in laws, codes and standards that affect our industry.

Having said that, here’s how our HBA got the R-A-T going:
First, we started a R-A-T committee, comprised of the following members: humanitarian agency, a bank or credit union rep, media consultant (salesman for local radio stations), several builders who would become the ramp captains, and the HBA VP.
One of our members works for St. Vincent de Paul, a local humanitarian agency. She already had several deserving prospects that she knew of, having met them through various agency interactions.
An application was drafted and sent out to 15-20 people (I think, I’m not sure of the exact number of original applicants).
From the applications received, a sub-committee met, went over them and selected 5. If we had the builders, we could’ve built 20. Pretty much everyone who’s asking for a wheelchair ramp deserves one.
You wouldn’t necessarily need to do the application process. If you’ve already got people in mind, there you go...build for them.

Once folks were selected, builders were assigned projects. They met w/ the folks, scoped out the site, built the mat. list, touched base w/ their lumberyards. I am a very loyal customer at one yard here in town...I talked with the owner about making a donation of materials. I had the mat. list built and gave it to him. The joists for a ramp are only 45” wide, every lumberyard has castoff pt lumber. The yard guys scrounged through the twisted pile and came up w/ usable 4’ chunks of 2x6, 2x4, 2x8s. It doesn’t have to be perfect lumber. He donated the entire lumber package (including cedar handrail). The plywood for all 5 projects was purchased from a distributer in Portland and discounts were given from the manufacturer on down. $130 panels only cost the HBA $50 or so (I think...it was a big discount, I know that).
I know other builders got their lumberyards to donate material as well.
The participating bank set up an account for this project and donated a good chunk of cash as well.

The media consultant met w/ a marketing professor at the U of O. They got a team of seniors to put together a marketing plan for us as a school project. The media guy got some PSAs out and contacted the local tv stations and newspaper. We didn’t get a great response but we’ll improve and get their attention next year!


The builders donated their time...building the mat. list, designing the ramp for the location, scheduling mat. delivery. Most had a crew that came out and put together the ramp in a day. Matt and I took a day for the first one, then I came back out to finish up the handrail the next day. The second one was built in record time because I had a work detail written out. I had two guys, besides me running saws, nail guns and screw guns and two guys digging holes, predrilling plywood panels, sanding cap rail, moving material, etc.

If you’re not part of an HBA, you’ll probably need some organization to work under, just to add legitimacy to your project. If you go to your local lumber yard and say, “hey, will you give me some materials for a ramp I’m gonna build for free?” - you might not get a positive response. For other suggestions, this is where your experience can help - I only have the experience w/ HBA as an organization. Maybe contact a local humanitarian agency and work the project under them. They might also already have a list of potential recipients.

More to come...

Mac
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 09:22 PM   #34
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Ramp Building Methods

On an existing sidewalk, you only need to dig holes for the first two handrail posts. The rest of the ramp will be supported by the sidewalk.
If no sidewalk exists, you’re diggin’ holes! Drop the pier blocks down in the ground so your beams are 1” above grade.
Measure height of landing (if grade changes along path of ramp, you’ll need to figure out height of landing from bottom of ramp)
Pull string from 3/4” below top of landing surface (if using 3/4” plywood) and go out one foot for each inch of rise.
Stake at end of ramp. This is the top edge of your structural framing.
Cut a 2x12x12 to 11’6” (if it’s 11 1/2” tall) and cut at an angle through it - full length.




This is the tip of your ramp. Nail 45” joists at 2’ oc (start w/ 2x4 on flat, then on edge, then up to 2x6 as height allows, then 2x8s. Double joists every 8’ from tip to catch plywood edges. Building this way means your second plywood piece will span the structural framing joint, strengthening the whole structure.
Cut your next 2x12 to continue edge, using stringline as guide.
Support the ramp every 8-9’ w/ a 4x6 beam carrying both stringers (cut beam top to match angle of ramp)
Secure 4x6 to concrete w/ blue screws and A35s.
Lock stringers into existing landing w/ ledger and Simpson A35s.
Glue joist and stringer tops, drop plywood down and screw through predrilled holes (12” on edges, 16” in the field)
If you're using SkidGuard plywood, make sure embossed side is up, smooth side down.
First piece of plywood (at ramp tip), run blue screws through edge into concrete below.
Rip piece of 2x pt for 3/4" lip at plywood edge - secure to concrete w/ blue screws.

Once ramp is finished, install handrail posts on outside edge evenly, not more than 8’ apart. First set of posts should be 5’ tall dropped 16” into hole. Add concrete the post base holes to make those solid.

Come to find out, I was the only guy who made a cedar handrail. The others used horizontal 2x4 pt to make up the rails. Doesn’t really matter function-wise, as long as you don’t build a handrail that has toe catchers. I just couldn't in good conscious build a pt handrail! 'Course, you've seen my pt....nasty!

If you build a vertical baluster handrail (like mine) position the 2x4 top and bottom rails on the inside. That way, you didn’t just create 50 possible toe stubbers!

If the wheelchair bound person moves under their own power, install graspable handrails on both sides of the ramp. They can use those to pull themselves up if necessary.

Mac

Last edited by BuiltByMAC; 11-02-2008 at 12:14 AM. Reason: spelling error
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 09:32 PM   #35
Jack of all Trades
 
Jack_Clark's Avatar
 
Trade: B General Specializing in Kitchens and Bathrooms
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 35
Rewards Points: 25

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Good stuff Mac!!! Way to be pro-active....... it will return 10 fold.
__________________
Regard it as just as desirable to build a chicken house as to build a cathedral.
Frank Lloyd Wright
Jack_Clark is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 09:48 PM   #36
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack_Clark View Post
Good stuff Mac!!! Way to be pro-active....... it will return 10 fold.
If I can get 20 guys here to take on a similar project in their neck of the woods, just think about that return - 100 folks will have a ramp by next Fall!
We can do this, guys, this doesn't have to be pie-in-the-sky good intentions.

This made a difference to me. I've done pro-bono work before but there was something special about this. Mobility is a huge thing that most of us take for granted - giving someone the freedom to get out their front door is priceless.

Show of hands, those who have expressed interest in working on something like this - do you belong to your HBA or a similar organization? That way, I'll know where people are coming from. If you're approaching this independently, we need come up w/ a plan for implementing this project.

Mac
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 09:53 PM   #37
Professional Instigator
 
rbsremodeling's Avatar
 
Trade: Design Build Remodeling Contractor DC MD
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Washington, DC/ Maryland
Posts: 6,872
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by BuiltByMAC View Post
If I can get 20 guys here to take on a similar project in their neck of the woods, just think about that return - 100 folks will have a ramp by next Fall!
We can do this, guys, this doesn't have to be pie-in-the-sky good intentions.

This made a difference to me. I've done pro-bono work before but there was something special about this. Mobility is a huge thing that most of us take for granted - giving someone the freedom to get out their front door is priceless.

Show of hands, those who have expressed interest in working on something like this - do you belong to your HBA or a similar organization? That way, I'll know where people are coming from. If you're approaching this independently, we need come up w/ a plan for implementing this project.

Mac
I will be doing it independently. I find for me that organizations slow things down. If I pull the trigger I want it done quickly and without red tape.

If any local groups choose to help or follow that will be a plus
__________________

rbsremodeling is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 10:10 PM   #38
Pro
 
BuiltByMAC's Avatar
 
Trade: Deck guy
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,257
Rewards Points: 2,270

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Web search on "charitable organization" and your area - should get some starting points for recipients.

Also, if you're the church-going type, that would be another networking environment to find deserving recipients.

Find the Vet center in your town, we've gotten very good at keeping our soldiers alive, sometimes left w/o limbs. No matter your views on this war, or war in general, I couldn't think of a more deserving recipient.

Mac
BuiltByMAC is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 10:27 PM   #39
Professional Instigator
 
rbsremodeling's Avatar
 
Trade: Design Build Remodeling Contractor DC MD
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Washington, DC/ Maryland
Posts: 6,872
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Good suggestions again. Thanks
__________________

rbsremodeling is offline  
Old 11-01-2008, 10:46 PM   #40
Jack of all Trades
 
Jack_Clark's Avatar
 
Trade: B General Specializing in Kitchens and Bathrooms
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 35
Rewards Points: 25

Re: Lil' Dude Can Cruise Now


Quote:
Originally Posted by BuiltByMAC View Post

Also, if you're the church-going type, that would be another networking environment to find deserving recipients.

Mac
We have a service offered through our church. It is meant to help single mothers living on their own. We do small projects and repair services to the homes as well as helping the elderly and those in troubled times. Some Saturdays are hard to motivate yourself to work for free but once you get there and the homeowner is literally in tears thanking you for offering your time it all gets put into perspective.

Jack

Advertisement

__________________
Regard it as just as desirable to build a chicken house as to build a cathedral.
Frank Lloyd Wright
Jack_Clark is offline  


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Dude CrpntrFrk New Member Introductions 8 10-27-2008 08:27 PM
My circuit breaker's totally trippin', dude... Jeremy E Electrical 12 12-04-2007 04:36 AM
The TCBA cruise pics are up. Teetorbilt Off Topic (Non Trade) 5 12-04-2006 09:43 PM
Virtual cruise, You tube Teetorbilt Technology 6 10-24-2006 11:58 AM
Too High Dude Glasshousebltr Carpentry 9 05-10-2005 04:33 PM

Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?