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The Joys Of Working On Your Own House

 
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:09 PM   #1
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The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


UGH. Could use some advice to keep me from jumping off the ledge.

Renovating the bathroom over the garage. Probably 25 years old. Had a 2" mud base down so I pulled a lot of weight out of it. Pulled the subfloor so I can replace it while also insulating from above and found a mess.

Floor joists are 2 x 8's spanning 10 feet except on one end they are notched and sitting on a nailer so they're basically 2 x 6's at this point.

I'll fix that by adding in some blocking to the main beam and put in some joist hangers.

2 feet in, running perpendicular is a 3" pipe, NOTCHED out of the bottom of 3 consecutive joists and then reduced to 2" holes through the next two for the shower drain. Surprisingly, it is solid as a rock and hasn't sagged a bit even after 20 years with all that concrete. I can't (won't) reroute the plumbing and I have no room below to beef anything up as the garage below is already less than 8 feet.

I'm thinking of just getting some 1/4" steel plate and sistering the joists with it. I've done it in the past with an engineers ok-he actually kind of made fun of me for the overkill.

Just wanted to vent. I've already rewired, found 3 separate junction boxes buried under sheetrock as well as one group of 3 wires just taped together and tucked under insulation. Hacks hacks hacks.

If anyone has any bright ideas, I'm all ears. If this were a client I'd probably stop all work and spec the whole thing out but I'm trying to avoid it.

Thanks for listening.
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Old 11-15-2019, 06:30 PM   #2
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Slap some ply on the sides and glue & screw.

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Old 11-15-2019, 07:04 PM   #3
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Maybe one of these:
https://www.metwood.com/joist-reinforcers/
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:26 PM   #4
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Floor joists SPF, Doug Fir, SYP, ...?
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:46 PM   #5
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Bridging or solid blocking will help spread the loads across joists and stiffen it up.

Steel plate is obviously the strongest fix, properly done.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:24 PM   #6
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Try this http://instafooting.com/product-info-joist-repair-kit/

video of math and where to place it

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Old 11-16-2019, 07:38 AM   #7
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Wish I'd known about these a month ago, could've been handy on the bathroom I'm doing

-Rich
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Old 11-16-2019, 08:24 AM   #8
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


I was having trouble figuring out how to run a shower drain so I called my plumber at the time. He came in and gave me a "top notch" job across a couple joists like it was no big deal. I wanted to bust him in the head with some of that pipe.

Add some plate, and use the stiffest/thickest subfloor ply you can fit. I did that for a marble bathroom and it was solid as a rock.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:27 PM   #9
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


I feel you. I have a laundry list of stuff i still need to do to my own house and plumbing and floor repairs are at the top of the list. Sux knowing i wont be able to pass the cost off to someone else to get the job done right but i hate doing hack work on my own stuff.

Got some pics of the joist situation? How close to the hangers are the notches? Im sure adding steel plates would be more than enough to keep it solid. Hell, it should be stronger than if the joists were never cut.

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Old 11-16-2019, 01:10 PM   #10
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Quote:
Originally Posted by rblakes1 View Post
Wish I'd known about these a month ago, could've been handy on the bathroom I'm doing

-Rich
I keep one on hand just in case, had to use my spare this week, plumber had to drill 2" hole where top of hole was 1.5" from top of joist to keep pitch for tub drain in 2x8 joists. Drilled his hole, I put strap on and he kept going.

Maybe didn't "need" it but for $50.00 it is peace of mind.
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Old 11-17-2019, 11:30 AM   #11
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


This may help.

https://www.finehomebuilding.com/pdf/021184090.pdf
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Old 11-17-2019, 12:32 PM   #12
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


all good stuff fellas thanks a ton. I am off the ledge. The engineer video also enlightened me that the notch at the end of the beam is OK. Up north with my building department it was a no no so it was ingrained in my head. (I'd rather use joist hangers anyway, notching seems like more work for less strength and less control over twisting or separating but that notch at the end was bugging me.)

I'm going to use the engineered solution that will help me sleep better at night, especially since he claims it will work on even a heavily notched beam on a 12 or 16 foot span.

Long live the nerds.

I've already added a beam and footings under the main level of my house that was sagging 2 full inches due to being 60 years old and having a dirt crawlspace. My "retirement" to Nashville is becoming the hardest job I've ever had, I miss having a crew of young and capable workers.

The first bathroom took me 9 weeks. I used to to do a total gut and redo in 2 weeks. Amazing what having 11 less people does to a timeline.

Anyway, thanks again, wish I could give half as much as I get from this forum.
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Old 11-17-2019, 02:30 PM   #13
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Item # 6 in the article I posted had a recommendation I read about 20 years ago also. It stated that with solid blocking,they need to be in line as opposed to the typical offset usually used. Has anyone ever read an alternate article to refute that mindset ?
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Old 11-17-2019, 06:44 PM   #14
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Re: The Joys Of Working On Your Own House


Quote:
Originally Posted by fjn View Post
Item # 6 in the article I posted had a recommendation I read about 20 years ago also. It stated that with solid blocking,they need to be in line as opposed to the typical offset usually used. Has anyone ever read an alternate article to refute that mindset ?
I haven't read an article, but up to 1" offsets are allowed on single top plate - rafter connections. That's a similar structural situation.
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Old 11-19-2019, 04:43 PM   #15
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They are selling them on Amazon now https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

$39.99 plus $4.49 for shipping. It's about what I paid them directly in May.

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