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jdela010 12-07-2011 11:53 PM

Graduating Student Advice
 
I was wondering if you guys could give me some advice for my future in the construction industry.

I am only 23 years old and currently a student one semester away from completing my masters degree in construction management. My undergrad degree is in business management. The only construction experience I have is very little from an internship where I was a laborer for a construction management company one summer building a high school in Miami.

When it comes time for me really to start searching the job market (Miami area) what positions should I be looking to apply for (what do you think I am qualified to do)? Also what salary should I expect with that position starting out? And any other advice you have for me that will help me get started in the right direction.

My ultimate goal is to get my GC license and own my own company one day but I know need to gain as much experience as possible first.

Thank you for your advice

Jayson

Splinter hands 12-08-2011 12:59 AM

The first position you should be applying for is a laborer to gain some real experience so you can see how things work. Possibly sales. Don't let that degree go to your head. Good luck.

EmmCeeDee 12-08-2011 01:17 AM

+1 what splinter said. Actually doing the work is an education in itself. A way to round out all that fancy book learnin. And I say that as someone with a Master of Architecture degree.

If you want to be a GC starting at the bottom and seeing how things actually get built is the best thing you can do early in your career.

skillman 12-08-2011 01:27 AM

Welcome :thumbsup:

Work your way up the ladder to see other side of how things get done on the job.

greg24k 12-08-2011 02:37 AM

Hang your Masters on the wall and get a job as a laborer on the construction site and take it from there while you young... would be a best place for you to start if you want to stick with the construction trade.

Seven-Delta-FortyOne 12-08-2011 02:41 AM

Yeah. Sorry to rain on your parade, but your degree in construction management is almost worthless. If you have no hands on experience, how are you to know if something is being done right, or being done wrong?

I could give you hundred examples of how that works.

Your best bet is to drop the backpack, pick up a toolbelt, and find a position on a construction site, and learn the trade from the bottom up. The best project managers are guys (or gals) who have worked in the trade from start to finish, and also have the mental capacity to run jobs.

rosethornva 12-08-2011 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skillman (Post 1349877)
Welcome :thumbsup:

Work your way up the ladder to see other side of how things get done on the job.

Excellent advice. Before I wrote my first book, I spent 10 years rehabbing old houses and doing all the maintenance on my tired old renting properties, and that gave me an excellent background for my next career as a real estate writer.

Rose

Willie T 12-08-2011 09:26 AM

What is with these single post nonsensical questions that have been coming in droves for the last few months?

I think this is about the thirtieth one I've read.

Is this a robot thing that someone just sends out to various forums?

sancho 12-08-2011 09:57 AM

Id got to a trade school. Learn the basics of hands on construction, then get a job as a helper with reputable contractor. Work with him a few years to learn how things actually work.
The best managers I ever had were the ones who worked their way up. They walked in their peoples shoes and know what they are going through.

To many of you kids come out of college, think your all that and dont respect or disregard the advice of the people wo have done the actual work for years.
Then come up with their own grandiose plans of how things should be.

Sorry for the rant. But its the truth how I see it.

jdela010 12-08-2011 12:16 PM

I was thinking more of an assistant superintendent position would be more appropriate for me. I dont really want to do labor again but if I have to I am not against it. I understand that I am at a learning stage and the best way to lean is from personal experience.

Zendik 12-08-2011 12:28 PM

I find myself getting offended by kids with no construction experience that earn degrees and expect to be high stepping over construction sites and tradesmen who have been in construction for decades.

I myself am working for my bachelors degree in construction management but I'm a 27 year veteran of the commercial drywall trades. I paid my dues humping enough rock to reach the Moon and back.

I also see this at school.
Kids that learn how buildings are built from drawing them and reading books without knowing the difference between a framing hammer and a roofers hatchet.

This is the problem with upper management in some companies. People with zero hands on experience creating schedules that run workers into the ground.
Every office jockey should have to stock sheetrock for 2 years straight.

BrandConst 12-08-2011 12:46 PM

Go to work for a large commercial company, get your experience and learn the ins and outs of the industry before opening up your own business.

dreamz 12-08-2011 02:36 PM

Hi,

The posistion that I would recommend for you is Assistant Project Manager. Most of the work by assistants involves paper pushing, doing man counts, preparing RFIs, Change Orders, and doing simple tasks that the Senior does not have time to do. They will send you out to the site occasionally to babysit. I would suggest that you listen and watch what is going on. As the rest of the guys said, hang your degree in the closet for awhile and get some real knowledge under your belt.

sancho 12-09-2011 09:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdela010 (Post 1350051)
I was thinking more of an assistant superintendent position would be more appropriate for me. I dont really want to do labor again but if I have to I am not against it. I understand that I am at a learning stage and the best way to lean is from personal experience.

Thats ok, you'll be one of the group that dont know the trade and just sits in the office and dictates.

There are plenty of them out there already. I thought you wanted to be better then the rest.

aureliconstruct 12-09-2011 10:49 AM

Do not bother getting your hands dirty. it will be a waste of time. Since you are graduating with a degree in construction management, you should go for that sort of job description. Big commercial construction companies are always looking for new blood. Send out your resume and even ask if you can be an intern. Management and laborers do not mix in the big leagues. If you start off as a laborer, you will always have your hands dirty. FYI

Splinter hands 12-10-2011 01:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aureliconstruct (Post 1350990)
Do not bother getting your hands dirty. it will be a waste of time. Since you are graduating with a degree in construction management, you should go for that sort of job description. Big commercial construction companies are always looking for new blood. Send out your resume and even ask if you can be an intern. Management and laborers do not mix in the big leagues. If you start off as a laborer, you will always have your hands dirty. FYI


:whistling:whistling:whistling

Friend 12-10-2011 06:59 AM

lets break it down a little bit. Question #1 do you want to work inside for the rest of your life or outside? My answer was outside. I have a GC license and own my own company as do most people here. I love what I do. If I don't make a lot of money I am still happy, because every day I get paid to do what I would do for free if I was independently wealthy. You say you want to have a GC license and own your own company. You must have some love there? Being a laborer sucks. But some crews are better than others, and it is an important step. If you have the drive to get a masters degree you will rise quickly in the ranks. If you pay attention you might really know something in about five years. In Ten years you could be a great GC. You will be 33 and have all the knowledge and skill to run a great company.

Jaws 12-10-2011 08:44 AM

Do you want to be a "real" builder or a paper contractor? Nothing worong with being a paper contractor,but if you have no desire to run the jobs on sites, f the laborer job. Get a job as an asst. Pm (PMs bitch) and push paper. You really shouldn't be trying to become a superintendent, you should come up through the trades for that job.

Go yo work for a large GC, probably commercial, you can start off in a dry office. But you better keep some good builders around as superintendents when you arr the boss.

The only thing that puzzles me about construction degrees, why go into construction at all if you don't like it? A laborer job is a means to an end, you start of as a laborer and work your way up, presumably because you actually want to build stuff. Why not get a degree in engineering or finance if you don't like to build?

Just curious

sancho 12-10-2011 10:33 AM

Forget it guys.
He asked the question,

Didnt like the answer.

Probably thought someone was going to offer him a job as a executive VP

Mike- 12-10-2011 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sancho
Forget it guys.
He asked the question,

Didnt like the answer.

Probably thought someone was going to offer him a job as a executive VP

This thread felt like a boxing match. KO'd in the 1st round!!!!


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