Plumbing Question

 
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Old 12-10-2017, 06:03 PM   #1
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Plumbing Question


My streets the last street where they are converting from septic to sewage. I'm going to be remodeling my upstairs bathroom and looking to add a bathroom in my basement.

Right now the main goes out of my basement wall about 4 feet up from the ground. Would it be worth it to cut out part of the slab and bury the main and connect it to the city sewers since I'm looking to add a bathroom to my basement anyways? I'm a contractor/builder but I do light plumbing, I don't normally do huge projects like this but I'm more than capable. Also I have an excavator and any tools needed at my disposal to make it easier.

Any suggestions or input on what you would do if you were in my situation? I'm going to be living in this house for a long time so I really want to remodel it for what I want. If I weren't going to be staying here I wouldn't worry about the bathroom. I just figure since I would like to tie into the sewer line anyways and get away from septic this would be the way to do it since I wanted a full bath in the basement. Sorry if I'm not explaining everything perfectly or if I'm using the wrong terms/words to describe the plumbing. I haven't actually moved a main before like this only tied into them for remodels and moved water lines etc.
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Old 12-11-2017, 12:48 AM   #2
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Re: Plumbing Question


sounds like you need a pump for the basement.

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Old 12-11-2017, 08:52 AM   #3
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Re: Plumbing Question


How deep is the city main in comparison to your basement floor? If it is lower then the floors and you have proper drainage to the street and you are planning on remodeling anyhow I would go for it.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:05 PM   #4
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Re: Plumbing Question


Indoor plumbing is over rated.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:11 PM   #5
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Indoor plumbing is over rated.
That's what trees and bushes are for.

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Old 12-11-2017, 06:33 PM   #6
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Re: Plumbing Question


If it was mine and the main was low enough, I'd put the new pipe under the floor.
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Old 12-11-2017, 06:48 PM   #7
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Re: Plumbing Question


Gravity will be around a lot longer than any sewage pump...If your main is low enough, it's a no brainier.
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Old 12-11-2017, 07:36 PM   #8
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Re: Plumbing Question


Before you do that you might want to consider the fact if the city sewer backed up itíll pump that chit in your basement

If we are talking about the same thing here in Chicago the older homes have a gravity sewer and every time we have a huge amount of rain it backs up sewage into peoples basements, newer homes have whatís called an overhead sewer which exits the home half way up the basement wall so it is much higher than the citys sewer system and will not allow it to flow into your home. The downside is your basement is lower then the discharge therefore if you put a bathroom in the basement you have to pump it up to the discharge which requires a either a special toilet or a sanitary pit and pump.

Of course this all depends on how high your house is relative to the cities sewer system..

Not sure if thatís the same thing youíre asking about but I know several friends of mine had the older style (gravity sewer) and they retrofit their house with an overhead sewer because they had raw sewage overflowed into their basement







If youíre just looking to add a half bath the easiest and probably best/cheapest would be to get a toilet like this which has a little holding tank behind it and an internal pump to pump the waste up to the discharge pipe, you can also drain the sink to it, however if you want to add a shower the shower drain would have to be higher then the toilet for the water to flow into the toilet holding tank. You can see in the picture the sink is draining right into the toilet discharge tank which gets ground up and pumped up to the discharge


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Old 12-11-2017, 07:58 PM   #9
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Re: Plumbing Question


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Before you do that you might want to consider the fact if the city sewer backed up itíll pump that chit in your basement

If we are talking about the same thing here in Chicago the older homes have a gravity sewer and every time we have a huge amount of rain it backs up sewage into peoples basements, newer homes have whatís called an overhead sewer which exits the home half way up the basement wall so it is much higher than the citys sewer system and will not allow it to flow into your home. The downside is your basement is lower then the discharge therefore if you put a bathroom in the basement you have to pump it up to the discharge which requires a either a special toilet or a sanitary pit and pump.

Of course this all depends on how high your house is relative to the cities sewer system..

Not sure if thatís the same thing youíre asking about but I know several friends of mine had the older style (gravity sewer) and they retrofit their house with an overhead sewer because they had raw sewage overflowed into their basement


If youíre just looking to add a half bath the easiest and probably best/cheapest would be to get a toilet like this which has a little holding tank behind it and an internal pump to pump the water up to the discharge, you can also drain the sink to it, however if you want to add a shower the shower drain would have to be higher then the toilet for the water to flow into the toilet holding tank. You can see in the picture the sink is draining right into the toilet discharge tank which gets ground up and pumped up to the discharge

Very few cities have combined sanitary and storm sewers the way Chicago does, so this is not really a problem for the vast majority of the country. Even in the event of a stopped city main the consequences would still be fairly minimized, especially if you included a backwater valve where the house drain exits to the sewer.
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Old 12-11-2017, 08:05 PM   #10
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Re: Plumbing Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerToiletSpider View Post
Very few cities have combined sanitary and storm sewers the way Chicago does, so this is not really a problem for the vast majority of the country. Even in the event of a stopped city main the consequences would still be fairly minimized, especially if you included a backwater valve where the house drain exits to the sewer.


Yes that is true, but I can tell you one time getting raw sewage in your house is one time too many since I have known a lot of people that it has happened to...friggin gross

it is my understanding that the backwater valve needs to be inspected regularly since they could get stuck and potentially fail. My house has an overhead sewer so I donít know if thatís true or not


Itís one thing when itís your chit it a whole different story when its all of your neighbors chit

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Old 12-12-2017, 12:48 AM   #11
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Re: Plumbing Question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Windycity View Post
Yes that is true, but I can tell you one time getting raw sewage in your house is one time too many since I have known a lot of people that it has happened to...friggin gross

it is my understanding that the backwater valve needs to be inspected regularly since they could get stuck and potentially fail. My house has an overhead sewer so I donít know if thatís true or not


Itís one thing when itís your chit it a whole different story when its all of your neighbors chit

LOL

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There's a few towns around here that suffer backups...mainly inflow and infiltration issues and antiquated systems...my first home was a nightmare with backups...installed a backwater valve and all was good...just couldn't use the chitter while the overflow was in progress.

My house now...first thing I put in as my sewer is way below the footing. Never had a backup....just didn't want to take chances.

All backwater valves need to be accessible for cleaning...proper install and pitch is important as well. I would check mine seasonally, thinking it would need cleaning, but I always found it to be pretty clean.

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