Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile

 
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:08 PM   #1
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Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


I got a call earlier this week from an existing customer who had me install 12x12 travertine throughout her first floor. She had a new stove and fridge installed and the goober who put them in put some pretty deep gouges in the tile especially in front of the stove. The fridge wasn't too bad because of the plastic casters, but there were a bunch of fine scratches.

Anyway I assured her I could get the scratches out. My normal method is to get out the ROS and start w/ 80 grit and work my way up to 220 and then hand sand the dull area w/ 320, 400, and lastly 600. This is for honed and filled. Generally this matches up pretty close to the original finish from my supplier.

What I'd like is to find some sandpaper for my ROS (5" 8 hole), that runs up to the needed 600 grit or even higher if I'm running polished.

I think Mirka goes up to 320 if you order online. 400 for 5 hole sanders.

Anyone have a line on the finer grits for ROS w/ holes so I can use a vacuum attachment? I've been looking for a while and I've come up dry.

Also interested in any more effective methods if you've come across any.

Thanks
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:15 PM   #2
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by HandyHails View Post
I got a call earlier this week from an existing customer who had me install 12x12 travertine throughout her first floor. She had a new stove and fridge installed and the goober who put them in put some pretty deep gouges in the tile especially in front of the stove. The fridge wasn't too bad because of the plastic casters, but there were a bunch of fine scratches.

Anyway I assured her I could get the scratches out. My normal method is to get out the ROS and start w/ 80 grit and work my way up to 220 and then hand sand the dull area w/ 320, 400, and lastly 600. This is for honed and filled. Generally this matches up pretty close to the original finish from my supplier.

What I'd like is to find some sandpaper for my ROS (5" 8 hole), that runs up to the needed 600 grit or even higher if I'm running polished.

I think Mirka goes up to 320 if you order online. 400 for 5 hole sanders.

Anyone have a line on the finer grits for ROS w/ holes so I can use a vacuum attachment? I've been looking for a while and I've come up dry.

Also interested in any more effective methods if you've come across any.

Thanks
I have looked hard for those when I was making a bird cage with acrylic. Ended up using 400 and 600 paper attached to sanding block and some elbow grease. Would be nice if someone has source.
if you can not find,Novus makes "heavy scratch remover" and "fine scratch remover" lotions to eliminate scratches. I have used them over acrylic and stainless steel and have great results after 400 and 600 grit. I assume it will work with travertine, but test before of course.Check with your local plastic sheet supplier.

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Last edited by astor; 01-29-2011 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:33 PM   #3
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


I've been going round and round about buying the Makita buffer. I've never tried truly buffing out any scratches w/ this, but I suppose it would work. Of course I could get the solid sanding pad w/ no holes, but they would make a fair amount of fine dust and most after 400 are made for wet sanding.
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Old 01-29-2011, 05:37 PM   #4
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


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I've been going round and round about buying the Makita buffer. I've never tried truly buffing out any scratches w/ this, but I suppose it would work. Of course I could get the solid sanding pad w/ no holes, but they would make a fair amount of fine dust and most after 400 are made for wet sanding.
Yeap, wet sanding with 400 and 600. Lotions work like 800 and 1000 (my guess)Plastic guy was using 400 in his shop, but I did not asked where he got it.
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Last edited by astor; 01-29-2011 at 05:39 PM.
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:04 PM   #5
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


Here you go. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/pag...71&cat=1,42500
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:04 PM   #6
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


can you hide the scratches by making them look "wet" with a sealer or something?

i use diamond pads like the granite guys use, for doing touchups and whatnot on stones.
search "diamond polishing pads"
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:11 PM   #7
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


Handy,
Here's my experience with this since I used to work with acrylic...
Wet sand by hand with aluminum oxide sandpaper, go in the direction of the scratches. 600,800,1200,2200
Then I would use a buffer with a standard sponge pad. We used to use a car polish (name unknown) but there was a pink and blue... rub the compound over the area, let it sit for a minute and buff with a dry pad(place pad on product before you turn it on). The compond had a little bit of grit so it would finish sand and polish simultaneously.
Give it a shot on a scrap piece of travertine...
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:28 PM   #8
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


I'll tell you as the greatest ancient secret
Cook beeswax, oil and turpentine in equal parts .. rub on the scratches, heat with heat gun for penetration... and buff .. just do not tell for anyone..
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:38 PM   #9
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I love you man.

That's exactly what I was looking for!!
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Old 01-29-2011, 06:41 PM   #10
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


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I love you man.

That's exactly what I was looking for!!

You're welcome
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Old 01-29-2011, 07:21 PM   #11
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


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What are you keeping in the cage? I've got 6 finches in the biggest cage I could find w/ small bars. Hows cleanup for you?
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Old 01-29-2011, 09:34 PM   #12
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


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What are you keeping in the cage? I've got 6 finches in the biggest cage I could find w/ small bars. Hows cleanup for you?
I got two Apricot Canaries. Before I used to keep them in this cage, but I had to keep the room door closed all the time (because of the cats), they need humans I guess, were not too happy, so now the cats learned they can not get them, birds are much happier.Move them into FR, we enjoy more and see them all the time.
Cleaning is the most easy job ever now.No seeds on the floor, nothing sticks to acrylic.just paper change every 4-5 days
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Old 01-29-2011, 09:40 PM   #13
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


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Originally Posted by Resta View Post
I'll tell you as the greatest ancient secret
Cook beeswax, oil and turpentine in equal parts .. rub on the scratches, heat with heat gun for penetration... and buff .. just do not tell for anyone..
What kind of oil?


My [IMG]http://**********************/forums/images/smilies/images.jpg[/IMG]

It might be a big bitch trying to match the polish on the rest of the stone. Be careful you don't end up having to polish the entire floor.
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Old 01-30-2011, 06:35 AM   #14
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Re: Polishing Out Scratches In Natural Tile


Nah, it hasn't been bad at all. Get it to 600 and its fine after a good seal. Travertine has so much difference in the tiles that when your talking honed and filled, its just a matter of making sure you get the whole tile that you are working on and reseal. GTG.

Astor,
Love the canaries. For us it was between a group of finches and a pair of canaries. The finches won out mostly on price, but also because of the cool socialization they have w/ one another. I bet the acrylic cage was a lot of fun to dream up and implement. Looks good.

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