Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !

 
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:03 PM   #1
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Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


HVAC'rs:

I have a 10-year old boiler, and it started dripping out the overflow pipe. The expansion tank was water-logged, so I replaced it, (along with a pressure-relief valve & float valve on the bubble-scrubber) To perform the work, I had to refill the entire system with water, and i'm pretty sure I got all the air out of the lines.

I am told that it takes time to get all the air and air within the water elimin
ated. The overflow valve continues to drip with every heating cycle. I've released water pressure at least 6 times with hose I still have hooked to the system.

1. Is it just a matter of time until its working?

2. I have let our a lot of water to release the pressure. (Am I trapping air in the upstairs line?)

3. There is almost nothing being release from the float valve -- isn't it supposed to be getting rid of the air?

Thanks for any advice,

John F. in Minnesota

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Old 03-05-2010, 08:27 PM   #2
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Do you have a pressure reducing valve that acts as an automatic water feed? You may be letting in more water than the system is pressurized for. You could also have the expansion tank on the wrong side of the unit. When water is heated it expands the volume, if located in the wrong spot the feed will always allow make up water thus flooding the system. This is not a do it yourself thing, you already attempted the alot of stuff call a plumber.

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Old 03-05-2010, 08:32 PM   #3
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


The expansion tank is located on the outlet, heated water, side. I don't have a pressure-reducing valve. To fill the system, the water supply is located past the outlet side.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:36 PM   #4
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


If it's a system boiler and you have a lot of air in the system then try shutting down all the rads except one. This will force the air out of the pipes and into the rads so it acn be vented. Make sure you have the correct pressure in the system and that you exspansion tank is at the correct pressure for the system.
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:43 PM   #5
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


My baseboard radiators don't have air valves. What next BC?
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Old 03-05-2010, 08:57 PM   #6
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Quote:
Originally Posted by theflynner View Post
My baseboard radiators don't have air valves. What next BC?
Do they have any kind of TRV (thermostatic radiator valve) or shut off valve. If they don't have vents then you could still shut each one down to push the air out of the system. Does the system have a automatic air vent (bleed valve) of some kind or do you have the piping setup up so that the air gets trapped in high point and you manually vent the system?
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:02 PM   #7
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


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Originally Posted by theflynner View Post
The expansion tank is located on the outlet, heated water, side. I don't have a pressure-reducing valve. To fill the system, the water supply is located past the outlet side.
If you dont have a pressure reducing feed the city pressure will exceed the limits of your system. Which is usually about 12 like the expansion tank.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:08 PM   #8
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Like tom says you could also be way to high on presuure. maybe the filling vavle is letting by and the system is filling slowly even when the valve is shut.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:10 PM   #9
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


The pressure was okay when I filled the system. I filled the system with water, and closed the system when the water seamed like it was a normal pressure of the ourside. My thinkinging is the heating will bring it the correct temp.

I have an air purger with a new float valve, but there seems to be very little air escaping. Shouldn't a lot of air be coming out?

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Old 03-05-2010, 09:12 PM   #10
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


That sounds like a possibity. But if that was the case, why am I hearing bubbles in the system?
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:19 PM   #11
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


The bubbles are the air more than likley. If your auto air valve is not releasing the air then you may need to install a manual one. Automatic air vents are not always perfect.

does yours look like this one? Yours should have a plastic cap that screws down on that thread that this picture dont show. The cap need to be loosend by hand to let the air escape. If the caps not on there and it sounds like there still loads of air in the system then i would add a manual air valve.

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Old 03-05-2010, 09:30 PM   #12
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Yep - a brand new one.

If I have bubbles in the system, wouldn't they get stuck in the upper floors? How can I vent this air in the basement?
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:31 PM   #13
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Quote:
Originally Posted by theflynner View Post
Yep - a brand new one.

If I have bubbles in the system, wouldn't they get stuck in the upper floors? How can I vent this air in the basement?

Well you should really have a vent at the highest point in the system. It's almost impossible to fill a system otherwise. Double check your basboard heaters for a vent of somekind.

Might look like this or may be a screw on thr rear of the rad thats really hard to get to.

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Old 03-05-2010, 09:42 PM   #14
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


I'll take a close look.

If that does't work, would it make sense to re-fill the boiler and let the pump run for a couple days without running the boiler? Could this help by slowing burping the air from the system at the float valve.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:52 PM   #15
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Believe it or not the best way to clear air from a system is to get the water as hot as possible. But really you shouldn't have to do this on a pressurized system. You really should have a vent either on or next to every rad in the home. If you don't have no vents that you can see then if you can shut down every rad except one then this will push the air around to the Auto air valve. Do this for about 5 Min's on each rad then open them all back up and you should be free of air. But again this can only work if you can shut all rads down and open one at a time.
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:00 PM   #16
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


I'll give it a try. Thanks Tom + BC
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:59 PM   #17
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Quote:
Originally Posted by theflynner View Post
That sounds like a possibity. But if that was the case, why am I hearing bubbles in the system?
The air scoop alone will usually never get that amount of air out by itself after youíve had the system opened up like you described. Even if it could, it would take forever. Just draining the boiler itself wonít get it out either.
Does this system have zone valves?
If so, it should also have drain valves on the heating loops down at the boiler, just above the zone valves but before the circ pump[s]
This is where I would connect a high temp rated drain hose and purge the loops one at a time with the boiler up to normal pressure and temp, starting with the top floor loop.
Youíll most likely need to manually throttle the fill valve open to keep the system pressure up in normal range as you purge the loops. Also, try not to let the boiler temp drop to low to fast.
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Old 03-06-2010, 04:27 AM   #18
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


There has to be a way to bleed that system somewhere on the baseboard. It usually requires a skate key.Also boiler must be off when bleeding the system. I have bleeds on all my baseboard at one end or another plus two bleed screws at the boiler where the copper pipes for each zone come out and go down to the floor..
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Old 03-06-2010, 06:34 AM   #19
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


Your pressure relief valve is probably not blowing off or dripping because of air in the system.

What is the brand and model number of the expansion tank you installed.

What pressure did you fill the system back up to when you filled it with cold water? And what water temp is the boiler set for?

What size(BTU) is the boiler? How many feet of baseboard do you have.

Its also possible, that you manual feed valve is not seating properly, and is bleeding through as was suggested for an auto feed valve.
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Old 03-06-2010, 03:59 PM   #20
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Re: Roofer Has A Dripping Boiler !


I wonder if maybe the original problem was incorrectly diagnosed and it was just an auto feed valve issue all along. In retrospect, it probably wouldnít have cost that much more to have a pro do the work instead of horsing around with it, but I guess thatís how we learn sometimes.

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