Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-26-2007, 11:00 AM   #1
Can't Post
 
sandyman720's Avatar
 
Trade: Construction
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 38
Rewards Points: 25

Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


What in your opinion is the best way to heat and cool a 225 sq foot addition with a powder room. The house has no central air and it has hot water heat.
sandyman720 is offline  

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   

Advertisement

 

Old 09-26-2007, 11:50 AM   #2
Thom
 
thom's Avatar
 
Trade: General Contractor/Homebuilder
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Albuquerque NM
Posts: 4,104
Rewards Points: 3,998

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


For heat, add another zone. Make it consistent and part of the structure, not a mismatched add-on. For A/C, sell them a system for the whole house. Why would you cool just the addition?

Advertisement

thom is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 11:56 AM   #3
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Interested to see what the "Pro's" got to say. We're looking at a garage for a customer to work on old muscle cars, so in-slab radiant heat seems best choice, and I've got my HVAC guy looking into a Mitsubishi unit for cooling. I'm interested in anybody with experience real-world. Sounds almost too good to be true, but seems flexible enough for almost any add-on situation.
neolitic is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 01:01 PM   #4
Contractor
 
72chevy4x4's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling & Home Additions
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 2,974
Rewards Points: 2,276

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


small wall heat pump system-good for cooling and heating. various sizes-3/4 ton, 1 ton, etc.. I wouldn't recommend that for a garage setting b/c of the openous -you might need to oversize to compensate for lack of airflow resistance (housewrap) and poor insulation. The wall units are similar to what you might find in a hotel room, but it's a heat pump.
72chevy4x4 is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 02:59 PM   #5
Pro
 
We Fix Houses's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling / Carpentry
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,226
Rewards Points: 640

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by neolitic View Post
Interested to see what the "Pro's" got to say. We're looking at a garage for a customer to work on old muscle cars, so in-slab radiant heat seems best choice, and I've got my HVAC guy looking into a Mitsubishi unit for cooling. I'm interested in anybody with experience real-world. Sounds almost too good to be true, but seems flexible enough for almost any add-on situation.
Radiant heat in a slab ? The majority of the floor will be covered cars and tool cabinets. Why is this even a good idea.......?

What about a split system. Condenser / compressor outside. Air handler inside. Or a package HVAC unit. Just need a 2' sq hole in the lower part of the wall. The unit sits on the concrete floor takes up a 2' x 2' space there. Ductwork extends to the ceiling with a supply vent at the top. Return is at the bottom. How big is the garage ? A 1.5 ton 55,000 btu unit is about $3500-$4000 installed. Avail Nat Gas, Propane, Elec Heat Pump.
We Fix Houses is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:00 PM   #6
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


What we're gonna do is a new purpose built free standing. My thought is if the guy's working on cars, heat at floor level is what counts. Bummer laying on slab in Indiana January with all the heat buzzin' around 5' off the floor.
Also thought this might a pply to original post, who seems to need to add another zone for heat, and separate cooling system. This is the one I'm talking about:<http://www.mrslim.com/products/Category.asp?ProductCategoryID=24>
Just thought the two might have something in common

Last edited by neolitic; 09-26-2007 at 03:09 PM.
neolitic is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:05 PM   #7
Pro
 
We Fix Houses's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling / Carpentry
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,226
Rewards Points: 640

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by neolitic View Post
What we're gonna do is a new purpose built free standing. My thought is if the guy's working on cars, heat at floor level is what counts. Bummer laying on slab in Indiana January with all the heat buzzin' around 5' off the floor.

Don't shops of any type have potential to have equipment bolted to the concrete ?
We Fix Houses is offline  
Old 09-26-2007, 03:11 PM   #8
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Not if he's got tubing in there
neolitic is offline  
Old 09-27-2007, 05:50 PM   #9
Electro-Mech. Contr.
 
MechanicalDVR's Avatar
 
Trade: Mechanical Contractor
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Jersey Shore
Posts: 761
Rewards Points: 500

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


I have done both radiant and FHA for garages, nothing beats radiant in a slab, you can blow scorched air at a slab all day and 20 minutes after it's off so is the heat. Hot air has no residual.
__________________
"Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere" mlk
100% Union and Proud of It
MechanicalDVR is offline  
Old 09-27-2007, 07:52 PM   #10
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by MechanicalDVR View Post
I have done both radiant and FHA for garages, nothing beats radiant in a slab, you can blow scorched air at a slab all day and 20 minutes after it's off so is the heat. Hot air has no residual.
That's where we're coming from here, He isn't gonna be taking a shower there, but he's gonna be on that slab alot. The cooling is the thing I'm puzzling on, he came across the Mitshubisi, Mr. Slim, and I'm wondering if anyone knows anything about them, and would it have an advantage over a through-the-wall?
Didn't mean to hijack Sandy's thread, just thought for him another zone and maybe the Mr. Slim might be his ticket too.

Last edited by neolitic; 09-27-2007 at 07:57 PM. Reason: alzheimers
neolitic is offline  
Old 09-28-2007, 06:32 AM   #11
Contractor
 
72chevy4x4's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodeling & Home Additions
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 2,974
Rewards Points: 2,276

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


you're talking about radiant heated floors, and it sounds cozy. What happens when he opens the garage door to carry in a transmission and 10 minutes of 30 degree weather flushes through the garage-how long will it take to warm up. I'm guessing the energy retention in the slab is great-how long does it take to warm up when you want to work inside (like coming out the next day-does it take a long time to come back up to temperature)?
72chevy4x4 is offline  
Old 09-28-2007, 08:30 AM   #12
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by 72chevy4x4 View Post
you're talking about radiant heated floors, and it sounds cozy. What happens when he opens the garage door to carry in a transmission and 10 minutes of 30 degree weather flushes through the garage-how long will it take to warm up. I'm guessing the energy retention in the slab is great-how long does it take to warm up when you want to work inside (like coming out the next day-does it take a long time to come back up to temperature)?
You don't switch it on/off like a space heater. You'd have to leave the door up for hours to make much difference. Well insulated the system won't be "calling" for heat as much as a forced air.
neolitic is offline  
Old 10-27-2007, 04:17 PM   #13
Owner / General Manager
 
aldematt57's Avatar
 
Trade: HVAC/R Contractor
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Kitty Hawk, N.C.
Posts: 13
Rewards Points: 10

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Check into a mini ductless split system.
Easy to install and moderately priced.
__________________
Reality is something you rise above.
aldematt57 is offline  
Old 10-27-2007, 04:31 PM   #14
The Grand Wazoo
 
KillerToiletSpider's Avatar
 
Trade: It blowed up real good!
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,755
Rewards Points: 1,538

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by neolitic View Post
Interested to see what the "Pro's" got to say. We're looking at a garage for a customer to work on old muscle cars, so in-slab radiant heat seems best choice, and I've got my HVAC guy looking into a Mitsubishi unit for cooling. I'm interested in anybody with experience real-world. Sounds almost too good to be true, but seems flexible enough for almost any add-on situation.
My chassis shop is a 20 X 36 pole barn, ten feet tall, I insulated it and heat it with a corn burning furnace. Much cheaper than natural gas, and if corn gets to expensive it can burn wood pellets, cherry pits, or soybeans.
__________________
A flush is better than a full house.
KillerToiletSpider is offline  
Old 10-27-2007, 04:49 PM   #15
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerToiletSpi View Post
My chassis shop is a 20 X 36 pole barn, ten feet tall, I insulated it and heat it with a corn burning furnace. Much cheaper than natural gas, and if corn gets to expensive it can burn wood pellets, cherry pits, or soybeans.
Pretty sure this guy won't want to be collecting cherry pits--at least not to heat his garage This guy thinks it's too much trouble to hire someone to mow the grass Looking at something close to the size of yours, trying to fudge the ratio of garage size to house size for zoning req.
The slab heat makes the most sense in this case. Maybe he'll be out there every day after work, maybe not for two weeks, maybe an hour before work -- always ready for you to lay down on the floor, or what ever. It's the cooling that he keeps going 'round with.
Where've you got a pole barn? Wicker Park?
__________________
Put your location in your profile!
(Sorry....it seems there really are dumb questions)
neolitic is offline  
Old 10-27-2007, 04:58 PM   #16
The Grand Wazoo
 
KillerToiletSpider's Avatar
 
Trade: It blowed up real good!
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Illinois
Posts: 3,755
Rewards Points: 1,538

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by neolitic View Post
Pretty sure this guy won't want to be collecting cherry pits--at least not to heat his garage This guy thinks it's too much trouble to hire someone to mow the grass Looking at something close to the size of yours, trying to fudge the ratio of garage size to house size for zoning req.
The slab heat makes the most sense in this case. Maybe he'll be out there every day after work, maybe not for two weeks, maybe an hour before work -- always ready for you to lay down on the floor, or what ever. It's the cooling that he keeps going 'round with.
Where've you got a pole barn? Wicker Park?
I rent it in an industrial park not far from my house. It was a storage building for a pallet making company, but they downsized and no longer needed it.
__________________
A flush is better than a full house.
KillerToiletSpider is offline  
Old 10-27-2007, 05:05 PM   #17
Curmudgeon
 
neolitic's Avatar
 
Trade: carpentry/remodeling/"Yes M'am we do"
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Beech Grove, Indiana, Birthplace of the "King of Cool"
Posts: 11,706
Rewards Points: 2,000

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerToiletSpi View Post
I rent it in an industrial park not far from my house. It was a storage building for a pallet making company, but they downsized and no longer needed it.
What with all the cast iron, greenfield... whatever code deals up there, I'm surprised that they let you burn stuff!
Think they'll ever get over that little O'Leary flap?
BTW, one of my son's friends calls his neighborhood "Little Ukraine", know where he's talking about?
__________________
Put your location in your profile!
(Sorry....it seems there really are dumb questions)

Last edited by neolitic; 10-27-2007 at 05:12 PM. Reason: senility
neolitic is offline  
Old 12-06-2007, 12:20 AM   #18
Registered User
 
jomin1016's Avatar
 
Trade: all
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1
Rewards Points: 10

Re: Best Way To Heat/Cool Addition


I know a little about those "Mr Slim" Mitsubishi units you referred to a few posts back... We have two at my work...they're great for ac - plenty powerful enough for a garage - only prob we've had is with the condensation pumps not being strong enough. Apparently, the pump was only designed to pump the condensation out 4 feet up....our ceiling, to our roof is 6 feet so we've had to change our condensation pumps quite a few times, finally deciding to do away with the pump and let it gravity drain into a bucket.

Advertisement

jomin1016 is offline  


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need some advise on an addition mattp Carpentry 5 08-05-2007 07:30 PM
Advice with room addition and blueprints A.W.Davis Remodeling 35 03-28-2007 07:32 PM
Help tying in this roof to addition jaymay75 Framing 0 06-18-2006 10:54 PM
Need help designing Roof for addition jaymay75 Framing 21 06-17-2006 10:47 PM
Addition Full Basement sady Specialty Trades Picture Post 4 12-29-2005 09:51 PM

Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?