Footing Pads

 
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:07 AM   #1
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Footing Pads


Anyone using these? WWW.FOOTINGPAD.COM Something just doesnt jive with me.

Last edited by BuiltByMAC; 02-23-2010 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:18 AM   #2
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Re: Footing Pads


The link didn't work but I went on their site.
They're kidding, right?

We don't put posts below grade. That's what concrete piers or technoposts are for.
The frost is gonna grab that post and dirt will get in between the "pad " and the bottom of the post and heave that deck out of level.

But go for it and let us know how that works out.

Sorry...that was uncalled for....

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Old 02-23-2010, 09:31 AM   #3
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Re: Footing Pads


I don't know if I could get my inspector to stop laughing long enough to tell me no...
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:39 AM   #4
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Re: Footing Pads


I wonder if any of those testimonials were written after a freeze / thaw cycle.
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:52 AM   #5
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Re: Footing Pads


I've used similar pads and as long as they are used in conjunction with other installation methods and materials in projects with oppropriate conditions they work fine.
Frost can heave concrete also.
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:53 AM   #6
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
Originally Posted by mics_54 View Post
Frost can heave concrete also.

Not when you do it right.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:01 AM   #7
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
The frost is gonna grab that post and dirt will get in between the "pad " and the bottom of the post and heave that deck out of level.
Not when you do it right.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:04 AM   #8
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Re: Footing Pads


Don't like the posts below grade either. I would think you'd want to check with your local building codes before using these as they may not be acceptable.

Last edited by bb71; 02-23-2010 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:18 AM   #9
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Re: Footing Pads


Budget constraints are as much a part of construction as methodology. Learn to fit the method to the requirements and experience cost effectivness.

Not all locations require the same construction techniques.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:28 AM   #10
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Re: Footing Pads


I'm absolutely open to new ideas especially those that make a better product for a better price. I'm also very concerned about the longevity of what I'm producing for my customer.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:30 AM   #11
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Re: Footing Pads


longevity is a factor in any cost benifit analysis...as is the labor, materials costs, logistics and performance.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:42 AM   #12
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
Originally Posted by mics_54 View Post
longevity is a factor in any cost benifit analysis...as is the labor, materials costs, logistics and performance.
Obvious to most but maybe not all.

Do you believe these pads will meet your expectation (and your customers) of how long your work should last? I have not used them but that is why I would question them (don't like burying the posts) and also their ability to hold through freeze / thaw.
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Old 02-23-2010, 11:09 AM   #13
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
Do you believe these pads will meet your expectation (and your customers) of how long your work should last?
That depends...As a contractor "my expectations" are always varied to the "customers expectations" How long I want the work to last is irrelevent. If the customer wants a project to be servicable for 10 years, thats what I want and that dictates the methods and therby the costs involved. But I wouldn't know his expectations if I didn't ask questions like... "how long do you want this to last" ..or.. "do you have a budget?"


Quote:
I have not used them but that is why I would question them (don't like burying the posts) and also their ability to hold through freeze / thaw.
Again....some people don't even know what a freeze/ thaw cycle is. Many places don't experience such conditions.

Also again.. the use of concrete isn't even possible sometimes. Logistics could be cost prohibitive. Not all ground material is frost suseptable. There are all kinds of criteria to consider and design a project around.

That's why you get paid the big bucks!
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Old 02-23-2010, 11:26 AM   #14
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
Originally Posted by mics_54 View Post
That depends...As a contractor "my expectations" are always varied to the "customers expectations" How long I want the work to last is irrelevent. If the customer wants a project to be servicable for 10 years, thats what I want and that dictates the methods and therby the costs involved. But I wouldn't know his expectations if I didn't ask questions like... "how long do you want this to last" ..or.. "do you have a budget?"

Of course but you didn't really answer the question. Your customer wants his deck to last 10 years. Do you believe these will hold up considering freeze / thaw conditions and direct burial?

Last edited by bb71; 02-23-2010 at 11:28 AM.
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Old 02-23-2010, 11:39 AM   #15
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Re: Footing Pads


This is only a partial hijack.

Do your utilities not bury poles directly in the earth up there in the frozen and wet north? If they do, is there a frost heave problem? How long do the poles last? It seems that once the exterior of the pole started rotting the pole would become unstable.
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Old 02-23-2010, 11:47 AM   #16
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Re: Footing Pads


Quote:
Your customer wants his deck to last 10 years. Do you believe these will hold up considering freeze / thaw conditions and direct burial?
I..nor you...probably can answer that except to reiterate what is asserted by the manufacturers or engineering community.
CCA treated timbers are garanteed for sub surface applications for 20 years. I can attest to this by experience.
As far as the pads I would have to rely on their certifications listed in their sales brochure.
As far as frost heaves if the post is back filled in non frost suseptable material and in ground that drains readily and the post is wrapped in poly below grade, it won't heave. I'm sure you are familiar with the fact that NFS material void of water doesn't heave.

On the other hand if you bury a post or concrete or steel piling in frost suseptable material with high moisture content...it won't stay there.
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Old 02-23-2010, 12:34 PM   #17
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Re: Footing Pads


reminds me of a commercial job I completed where the engineer required the 1st floor slab to be confirmed to be 4" thick, which in turn carried the weight of floor #2 and #3 above via a 3.5"x3.5" post. The slab was around 3.5" thick and the engineers solution was to use a 1/4" piece of steel 12" square, which dispersed the weight across an area of 144sq inches as compared to the 12.25sq inches.
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Old 02-23-2010, 01:53 PM   #18
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Re: Footing Pads


The original poster (Quinn) is from PA and there IS frost in PA. His link directed us to a frisbee and a square post. That was why my initial reaction was

Sonotubes and technoposts are round for a reason. The way I understand it is the frost tends to slip by a curved surface and can't get a grip like it can on a square surface.

Please correct me.
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Old 02-23-2010, 09:08 PM   #19
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Re: Footing Pads


What's to stop any yahoo from nailing a round piece of plastic to the bottom a post and using that?

Better yet, why not just drill some holes in the bottom of a Home Depot bucket, nail it to the bottom of your post and voila!

$5 a footing


Honestly, this is just a hair brained idea. As mentioned, I'd love to see the face of one of my building inspectors as I drop a post in a hole with one of those
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:02 PM   #20
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Re: Footing Pads


If it is a ledger supported deck, it would be suicide the use any shallow post since the soil is what heaves up and may, but not always reside. This leads to a non-level deck and redistribution of loads at all connections and a shorter life, not considering the aesthetic and practical/appearance factors.

A proper free standing deck with concrete piers below the frost level is best and is they only thing approved in many areas. Sonotubes are usually, the most economical and practical, but different situations can offer other alternates. The posts are placed about 2' away from thr house and the above surface is cantilevered back to with 1/2" of the house siding. This eliminates all the possible flashing, moisture, rot and mold problems.

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