Electrical Management After Demolition - Electrical - Contractor Talk

Electrical Management After Demolition

 
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Old 01-24-2018, 08:37 PM   #1
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Electrical Management After Demolition


Were completing a large scale renovation involving the removal and relocation of interior walls. My question is if there is a preferred manner to handle the loose Romex prior to the electricsl estimating phase? I can't help but feel that leaving everything hanging looks very unprofessional to our prospective electricians. Let me know if I'm over thinking this.
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Old 01-24-2018, 08:53 PM   #2
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


I Wire nut and tape the ends and coil up and out of the way if I'm unsure of what the electricians scope is. Usually wiring will be redone back to a box or panel so I often cut wire back enough that it's out of the way but still visible and accessible. Never a bad idea to label as much as possible during demo.

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Old 01-24-2018, 08:56 PM   #3
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


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Originally Posted by bedrichards View Post
Were completing a large scale renovation involving the removal and relocation of interior walls. My question is if there is a preferred manner to handle the loose Romex prior to the electricsl estimating phase? I can't help but feel that leaving everything hanging looks very unprofessional to our prospective electricians. Let me know if I'm over thinking this.
In a properly managed remodel or renovation, the electrical contractor would have removed or relocated those ahead of time, depending on the scope of work.
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Old 01-24-2018, 08:57 PM   #4
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


It depends on the job and the scope of work to be performed. Our electrician is typically running new romex to most of the devices in the space we are working in, or even new circuits. We will usually clean up stuff as needed just because it gets it out of our way to do the work we need to do.

I wouldn't think that your electrician would be upset at you leaving it there. If anything, it allows him to identify how things are run and such and unless you've got a pretty good understanding of electrical, you may cause a problem by pulling things out.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:31 PM   #5
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


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If anything, it allows him to identify how things are run and such and unless you've got a pretty good understanding of electrical, you may cause a problem by pulling things out.
Exactly!

Good electricians are very analytical by nature and will help with planning out how to keep the rest of the house powered with temporary jumpers, etc., and reusing any runs of power that can be preserved as long as they have plans. Then pull the runs into the new walls, etc.

If someone just cuts everything out that is "in their way" then the EC has to start from scratch and trace down what went where and it usually involves much much more expense.

We call those rescue jobs.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:54 PM   #6
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


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In a properly managed remodel or renovation, the electrical contractor would have removed or relocated those ahead of time, depending on the scope of work.
Kind of hard to do that before the walls are opened up.

As Ron confirms in a later post, leave the wires hanging wherever they happen to be. Chopping/terminating them willy-nilly is going to make his job much harder--and the cost will reflect that.
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Old 01-24-2018, 09:57 PM   #7
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


Agree with the posts above. Really depends on size of job. Moving a bedroom wall or two and a full gut can be handled a bit differently. Good to have electricians in near the start of the job to get things sorted out and like was mentioned above, temp power and light is hugely helpful if necessary.
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Old 01-25-2018, 10:34 AM   #8
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


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Originally Posted by Tinstaafl View Post
Kind of hard to do that before the walls are opened up.

As Ron confirms in a later post, leave the wires hanging wherever they happen to be. Chopping/terminating them willy-nilly is going to make his job much harder--and the cost will reflect that.
This is true. We have encountered this in large remodels. Leave the wiring where it is. Cap it off (wire nuts), turn off the breakers. I like to map out how it was, and, how it will be in the future. I like to see which raceways and runs were, so that I can decide whether to use them in the future.

Also, sometimes leaving the wiring as is, makes for easier pull wires for the new stuff.
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Old 01-25-2018, 12:42 PM   #9
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Re: Electrical Management After Demolition


I cut everything out and rewire everything per plans, it saves time and money and there are no issues to deal with down the road when the final finish is done.

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