Bonding Bushings

 
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:36 PM   #41
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Re: Bonding Bushings


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Originally Posted by dmanola7 View Post
Why wouldn't you use rigid?
Realistically how much is that going to cost you, time (cut&thread) and material. Running 1" or 1 1/4? If you are not going to C&T, your connector is not cheap, might as well use EMT at that point.

I look at a job and I decide what I 'm going to use, so it's not cut in stone. You may think about some sced 80 pvc, looks a little better than sced40, will last longer, never rust and you won't need a bonding bushing.

I would run either sced80 pvc or EMT, not sure which one without looking at the job.
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Old 06-05-2009, 06:57 AM   #42
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Re: Bonding Bushings


For what it is worth my inspector wont pass anything whether it is EMT, Rigid or PVC regardless of wire size unless it has bushings at each end. He has told me that if i can see the end "tip or edge" of the nipple "male adapter" then put a bushing on it, and for the cost of the bushing why chance compremising the wire or having to take apart your work just to put a bushing on to satisfy your inspector. The cost is minor and should be passed on to the customer, oh hell we are making money on these items are we not? If you are working with EMT or Rigid he wants to see that it is also bonded. IMO i would install PVC and 4-wire and be done. This is how i do most sub-panels unless distance is an issue, then i will drive another set of rods and ground the sub-panel at the other location.
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:01 AM   #43
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Re: Bonding Bushings


I was simply pointing out the required code minimum. You want to put 1/2" bushings on emt connectors be my guest.
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:19 AM   #44
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Re: Bonding Bushings


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodchuck2 View Post
For what it is worth my inspector wont pass anything whether it is EMT, Rigid or PVC regardless of wire size unless it has bushings at each end. He has told me that if i can see the end "tip or edge" of the nipple "male adapter" then put a bushing on it, and for the cost of the bushing why chance compremising the wire or having to take apart your work just to put a bushing on to satisfy your inspector. The cost is minor and should be passed on to the customer, oh hell we are making money on these items are we not? If you are working with EMT or Rigid he wants to see that it is also bonded. IMO i would install PVC and 4-wire and be done. This is how i do most sub-panels unless distance is an issue, then i will drive another set of rods and ground the sub-panel at the other location.

I would ask him for the code reference
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Old 06-05-2009, 07:54 PM   #45
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Re: Bonding Bushings


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Thanks Magnettica, from now on your the man Im gonna run to for the CORRECT answers.

TX gave you the right answer. He even made you think a little about it.

Bond bushing on one end if the nippple has the service conductors in it or if it has concentric KO's and voltage over 250 to ground.

I had an inspector ask me about bond bushings on a panel one time. I pointed out that they were feeders with a ground (not unfused service conductors), the voltage was 120 to ground and that BB's weren't necessary.

He spent a half hour in his truck searching a code book before he came back and said "oh....I see now that you have locknuts inside and outside , so it's OK".

I laughed (to myself)

PS. When it's close, I use rigid nipples to tie enclosures together. Rust isn't an issue with exposed galvanized here in the desert unless it's in contact with the soil. THEN it's a REAL issue. If the enclosures are more than a few inches apart, I use EMT. It just seems better suited. Metal cans joined by metal conduit.
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Last edited by 220/221; 06-05-2009 at 07:59 PM.
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Old 06-05-2009, 07:59 PM   #46
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Re: Bonding Bushings


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodchuck2 View Post
For what it is worth my inspector wont pass anything whether it is EMT, Rigid or PVC regardless of wire size unless it has bushings at each end. He has told me that if i can see the end "tip or edge" of the nipple "male adapter" then put a bushing on it, and for the cost of the bushing why chance compremising the wire or having to take apart your work just to put a bushing on to satisfy your inspector. The cost is minor and should be passed on to the customer, oh hell we are making money on these items are we not? If you are working with EMT or Rigid he wants to see that it is also bonded. IMO i would install PVC and 4-wire and be done. This is how i do most sub-panels unless distance is an issue, then i will drive another set of rods and ground the sub-panel at the other location.
you are right it may not be code but for a few pennies dont worry about the aggrivation(sp)
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:04 PM   #47
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Re: Bonding Bushings


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Originally Posted by 220/221 View Post
TX gave you the right answer. He even made you think a little about it.

Bond bushing on one end if the nippple has the service conductors in it or if it has concentric KO's and voltage over 250 to ground.

I had an inspector ask me about bond bushings on a panel one time. I pointed out that they were feeders with a ground (not unfused service conductors), the voltage was 120 to ground and that BB's weren't necessary.

He spent a half hour in his truck searching a code book before he came back and said "oh....I see now that you have locknuts inside and outside , so it's OK".

I laughed (to myself)

PS. When it's close, I use rigid nipples to tie enclosures together. Rust isn't an issue with exposed galvanized here in the desert unless it's in contact with the soil. THEN it's a REAL issue. If the enclosures are more than a few inches apart, I use EMT. It just seems better suited. Metal cans joined by metal conduit.
ok i'am confused you had a feeder that was only 120 v to ground
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Old 06-05-2009, 09:22 PM   #48
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Re: Bonding Bushings


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Originally Posted by Magnettica View Post
I was simply pointing out the required code minimum. You want to put 1/2" bushings on emt connectors be my guest.
Yeah I was just referring to him running rigid, point taken
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Old 06-07-2009, 08:34 PM   #49
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Re: Bonding Bushings


Cut and dry answer--> You do not have service conductors, you have concentric/eccentric knockouts and

A) your voltage is under 250 volts to ground --> NO Bond Bushing Needed

B) Your voltage is OVER 250 volts to ground --> Bond Bushing Required

I'm willing to bet your voltage is under 250 volts as you say it's a doctors HOUSE
NO Bond bushings needed just use a plastic bushing an be done with it.
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Old 06-07-2009, 08:42 PM   #50
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Re: Bonding Bushings


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ok i'am confused you had a feeder that was only 120 v to ground
uhhmm...yeah?

120/240 single phase residential service=120V to ground. Is that unusual?

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