Too Many Nail Pops!!

 
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Old 05-16-2007, 07:39 AM   #1
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Too Many Nail Pops!!


I am having a problem with nail pops. When I say nail pops I mean the whole sheet of every sheet in the house! Was trying to figure out what was the cause of them as I have never seen this before on such a grand scale. I think that the wood used was too wet and moisture got locked up between vapour barrier and drywall. Can anyone tell me what is acceptable moisture content for wood studding before drywalling over. thanks , d-ball
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Old 05-16-2007, 08:25 AM   #2
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


Wood is considered "dry" at 19%. Wood used indoors will eventually stabilize at 8-14% moisture content;outdoors at 12-18%. The majority of wood shrinkage occurs as moisture content goes from 28% to 19%.

Wood shrinkage can cause "nail popping" in drywall finishes. As the fasteners are eased out of the wood, a space is created between the drywall and its supports. Subsequent pressure on the drywall causes the fastener heads to push through the drywall compound covering them, resulting in nail popping.

The "nail popping" effect can also be observed in the ceiling, normally around the perimeter As the fasteners are pushed outward, the downward movement of the ceiling is resisted by the wall gyproc, forcing the fasteners through the drywall compound covering. Since the ceiling perimeter is normally supported by the wall, the nails around the perimeter serve no essential purpose. This source of nail popping can be eliminated by not putting ceiling fasteners within 12" (300 mm) of the walls and reduced by using drywall stud adhesive in the field of the wall gyproc.

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Old 05-17-2007, 09:32 PM   #3
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


Are you sure the rockers arent setting the screws to deep?? its hard to believe you' d have every nail pop on every sheet . usually you see it in certain areas stairways etc. or possibly the sheets were slightly soggy.

Last edited by oldrivers; 05-17-2007 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 05-17-2007, 09:59 PM   #4
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


I'm going with humidity. My house was built in the late '70's and I refurbished it in 2000, hand sanding the walls with an orbital for a 'yacht finish' l have been seeing pops for the last few years.

The house has been at 78* and 60% humidity. Go figure.
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Old 05-18-2007, 04:22 PM   #5
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


Insulation plays a role too, depending on how it was installed... most common mistake is cieling insulation hung or stapled to bottom of truss instead of inside (sides of truss), causing the insulation to bag or droop.
When hung if the sheet is not held up tight (BEFORE!) screwing you wont get a good fit. Blow in, insulation sucks too, I dont think Ive ever seen them get that right, there always over filling walls, and unless the drywall is held tight at screwing, problems. Also as "drvers" mentioned screw depth plays a big role.
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Old 05-25-2007, 07:50 PM   #6
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


Chances are they didn't hold the drywall tight when they fastened it. Best way to fix it is to push the drywall tight and "Hold it Tight" as you add a couple of screws to the one that poped, on either side of it. The n drive or pound the poped screws in. Remud as usual.
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Old 05-25-2007, 09:31 PM   #7
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by krobinson View Post
Wood is considered "dry" at 19%. Wood used indoors will eventually stabilize at 8-14% moisture content;outdoors at 12-18%. The majority of wood shrinkage occurs as moisture content goes from 28% to 19%.

Wood shrinkage can cause "nail popping" in drywall finishes. As the fasteners are eased out of the wood, a space is created between the drywall and its supports. Subsequent pressure on the drywall causes the fastener heads to push through the drywall compound covering them, resulting in nail popping.

The "nail popping" effect can also be observed in the ceiling, normally around the perimeter As the fasteners are pushed outward, the downward movement of the ceiling is resisted by the wall gyproc, forcing the fasteners through the drywall compound covering. Since the ceiling perimeter is normally supported by the wall, the nails around the perimeter serve no essential purpose. This source of nail popping can be eliminated by not putting ceiling fasteners within 12" (300 mm) of the walls and reduced by using drywall stud adhesive in the field of the wall gyproc.
Ok, Let me say this first, as is my proverbial sin, I have not read the previous post responses completely, just went over the original post quickly:

#1.) Your local building code book should list it. As mentioned already, 19% is what I recall...

OK, now in regards to:
Popped nails: We did a pre-fab job about 5 years ago - Popped nails/screws EVERYWHERE.

Ended up being damp framing lumber....during the pre-fab construction process....
Result: Manufacturer admitted the fault....
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Last edited by AtlanticWBConst; 05-25-2007 at 09:34 PM.
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Old 05-26-2007, 06:12 AM   #8
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Re: Too Many Nail Pops!!


It sounds like the house was open to the eliments before it had time to dry out, the drywallers hung the board done deal. The other thing is if you have Nail Pops why didn't they use screws? then if they had used screws why would pound them back in? wouldn't you use a screw gun to reset them? I think I remember why I don't do new home construction anymore.

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