Old Plaster Repair

 
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Old 01-30-2007, 05:51 PM   #1
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Old Plaster Repair


Hey all,

This is what I am dealing with: Late 18th century plaster over exterior masonary wall. The wall was absorbing water from a blocked downspout. I believe that I fixed the leaking problem, but there was interior plaster damage. The plaster is approximately, 1 in. thick, horse-hair brown coat over brick. There are 3 sections that are around 1 ft. by 2 ft. that I had to remove down to the brick, because they had just turned to sand. I want to build it back up the right way. I have extensive experience in repairing plaster cracks, so I am familiar with bonding primers, and the use of hot mud and fiberglass tape, but these are not cracks. Any advice would be appreciated.
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Old 02-01-2007, 06:40 AM   #2
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


Chris you should do it like the old timers, portland cement, sand and lime trowel it right on the brick let it cure and come back in with plaster and bring your repair up level with the wall surface let cure and prime and paint.

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Old 10-16-2008, 10:52 PM   #3
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


I get this a lot. Clean the area and get yourself a 3ft roll of fiberglass mesh. You might want o hit the area with plasterweld first. Use Durabond mixed with gypsolite for the base then smooth with ez sand mixed with diamond plaster to smooth. Skim with lightweight joint compound to finish. You can go through some of my older posts I've addressed this issue with more detail many times.
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Old 10-17-2008, 04:07 AM   #4
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


The OP is almost two years old.
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Old 10-27-2008, 05:45 PM   #5
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


I would use a product called glidwall this is like a fiberglass sheet about 3 feet wide it covers the whole wall so cracks don't come back so after you have put the scatch coat on you skim the wall with drywall compound then put glidwall on like drywall tape, let me know if this helps you can get glidwall at some paint stores delux here in cincinnati regards Rob
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Old 10-28-2008, 12:38 PM   #6
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


Chris, check and make sure there isn't a Historical Society cause they may have you fix it like back when the house was built. If there's a local horse stable you can get hair to add to the mix, I had to do that with a Historical house, this way no one can say you hacked the house. Just take your time, make sure you mix your batch's up well if you use the hair, it will hold moisture. the brick should be wet when you apply your mud, Good luck


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Old 10-28-2008, 02:32 PM   #7
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Re: Old Plaster Repair


Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankawitz View Post
Chris, check and make sure there isn't a Historical Society cause they may have you fix it like back when the house was built. If there's a local horse stable you can get hair to add to the mix, I had to do that with a Historical house, this way no one can say you hacked the house. Just take your time, make sure you mix your batch's up well if you use the hair, it will hold moisture. the brick should be wet when you apply your mud, Good luck


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I would guess that good ol' Chris has all ready fixed this problem as his post is from FEBUARY OF '07!

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in texas with framing and cornish people will do it for 3.00 a foot. What do yall think about that? Just laber
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