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Old 04-17-2012, 03:34 PM   #21
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Re: Books


Gerald Lynch has written a couple of books about gauged brickwork, although the cost of this type of work has made it less popular these days.
There is a firm near me that will cut the bricks for you, or even build the arch into the lintel for you so all that is needed is for the bricklayers to do is put in an arch in one piece.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:44 PM   #22
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Re: Books


I agree...Masonry Skills by Richard Kreh is a great book. One of the best ones out there...and it is often used in vo tech training programs.

there are a lot to choose from here: http://www.bontool.com/category1~D~b...~G~~C~~N~1.htm
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:29 PM   #23
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Re: Books


STUART45 In his book about gauged work Lynch makes mention of the use of white lead in the joints. Is that something still in use in U.K.? I know in U.S. they would probably want to arrest you if you even mention the use of lead.
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:56 PM   #24
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A mix of white lead and shellac gives a better joint than lime putty as it gives a very fine white joint which dries quite hard.
However lime putty is most commonly used.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:05 PM   #25
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fjn,
your question about white lead being legal, it's not legal here anymore, but there is some old stock around.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:16 PM   #26
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Re: Books


Are you talking about tuckpointing? true tuckpointing? that is something I would LOVE to try.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:38 PM   #27
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Tuckpointing was known as a poor man's gauged brickwork. It was done as a cheaper method of making normal brickwork look like gauged brickwork.
It is however still really time consuming and expensive. In London it costs about $150 a square yard. Normally done by people who do nothing else, well paid, but must be really boring to do it all day and every day.
About using white lead and shellac, the downside is that you have to be even more accurate with the brick cutting. An arch would have to fit together on the setting out board without any joints.

Last edited by stuart45; 04-17-2012 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:12 PM   #28
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Tuckpointing was known as a poor man's gauged brickwork. It was done as a cheaper method of making normal brickwork look like gauged brickwork.
It is however still really time consuming and expensive. In London it costs about $150 a square yard. Normally done by people who do nothing else, well paid, but must be really boring to do it all day and every day.
I've never heard of gauged brickwork. I can't imagine tuckpointing being a poor mans anything. I'm going to do some research on gauged work. i agree, it would be boring to do day in and day out but I'd like to try it sometime. I'd think you could make some money at it after a while. If I ever do it at least I have a base price, thanks

Edit I looked up gauged brick. I'd heard of a gauged arch as one that had brick cut and fitted tightly, and I'd heard of rubbed brick, I guess those are both gauged brick?
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:26 PM   #29
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I posted a video of guys doing traditional tuckpointing and wow, no way. Quickpoint doesnt make a tip that small hahah
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:00 PM   #30
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Re: Books


Quote:
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STUART45 In his book about gauged work Lynch makes mention of the use of white lead in the joints. Is that something still in use in U.K.? I know in U.S. they would probably want to arrest you if you even mention the use of lead.
Not to change the subject.......but they have interlocking lead 'brick' that come in various thicknesses........for x-ray rooms and other applications where shielding is needed.....pretty cool actually......
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:09 PM   #31
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Re: Books


According to the Brickwork book that I just finished, the terms are a little different than I am used to. Gauged=cut/rubbed to shape to provide thin joints, esp. for arches. Tuckpointing=what we call tuckpointing plus raking a channel then re-tucking with a raised line, giving the appearance of uniform thin mortar joints, i.e. similar to what we call grape-vining.

I will stick with tuckpointing as meaning removing bad mortar from a joint and replacing it with fresh (and appropriate) mortar, no matter what the joint profile.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:18 AM   #32
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According to the Brickwork book that I just finished, the terms are a little different than I am used to. Gauged=cut/rubbed to shape to provide thin joints, esp. for arches. Tuckpointing=what we call tuckpointing plus raking a channel then re-tucking with a raised line, giving the appearance of uniform thin mortar joints, i.e. similar to what we call grape-vining.

I will stick with tuckpointing as meaning removing bad mortar from a joint and replacing it with fresh (and appropriate) mortar, no matter what the joint profile.
If that book is 'Brickwork; Architecture and Design' you must be a fast reader Tscar.
I've only just got to the bit where the Judge released a bricklayer from prison to build his chimneys, but had him hung once he'd finished.
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Old 04-18-2012, 11:45 AM   #33
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I am a fast reader, I read it in 2 settings.
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Old 04-18-2012, 12:14 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tscarborough View Post
According to the Brickwork book that I just finished, the terms are a little different than I am used to. Gauged=cut/rubbed to shape to provide thin joints, esp. for arches. Tuckpointing=what we call tuckpointing plus raking a channel then re-tucking with a raised line, giving the appearance of uniform thin mortar joints, i.e. similar to what we call grape-vining.

I will stick with tuckpointing as meaning removing bad mortar from a joint and replacing it with fresh (and appropriate) mortar, no matter what the joint profile.
Maybe we should call it "gauged pointing",
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Old 04-18-2012, 05:07 PM   #35
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If that book is 'Brickwork; Architecture and Design' you must be a fast reader Tscar.
I've only just got to the bit where the Judge released a bricklayer from prison to build his chimneys, but had him hung once he'd finished.
whoa...nothing slows you down like knowing you are going to be hung upon completion.
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Old 04-18-2012, 05:26 PM   #36
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Tuckpointing=what we call tuckpointing plus raking a channel then re-tucking with a raised line, giving the appearance of uniform thin mortar joints, i.e. similar to what we call grape-vining.
If you call grape-vine a raised profile (what i would call a square bead) What do you call the very small(1/8" 1/2 round) indented profile (what I call grapevine)?
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Old 04-18-2012, 05:51 PM   #37
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Innie grapevine?
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Old 04-18-2012, 06:23 PM   #38
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innie grapevine.. it gets the point across anyway.

these are the joints as I know them. Out of curiosity, what do others call them? Just to clear up my terrible drawing, the shaded area is the joint. and any others that people want to add, please do.
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Old 04-18-2012, 06:47 PM   #39
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That was a joke, if it is done to make the brick appear equal sized, THAT is what I call gauging.
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Old 04-18-2012, 07:11 PM   #40
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Another question for Stuart. Any idea what or how much black would be added to the lime putty to make a black tuckpoint? The stuff that's around here is usually black and the stuff that hasn't washed off is still really black.

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