Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention

 
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Old 10-23-2017, 03:20 PM   #1
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Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


Haven't got an official bid, but for an average new house build I'm thinking it would be pretty cheap insurance to prime all structural framing prior to rough ins. If you sprayed them with kilz, would help alleviate some mold concerns down the line and my guess is you could get it done for $1-2k. Any of you already doing this? Or waste of money?

What am I missing here re: law of unintended consequences?
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Old 10-23-2017, 06:39 PM   #2
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


As long as you build the place properly, and get it dried in in a timely manner, there shouldn't be any moisture to promote mold growth. Down the road, it should only happen if the homeowner neglects maintenance or has an appliance go south--which should be covered by insurance in many cases.

I just don't see you getting much of a return on your money, unless you can make some big marketing points with it. Which I doubt.

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Old 10-23-2017, 06:41 PM   #3
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


I think the must vulnerable areas are the first floor joists. They tend to get wet and stay wet due to being shaded by the deck. We have worked on a couple of houses where they had to be treated after the roof was on.
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Old 10-24-2017, 12:34 AM   #4
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


Why not just use lumber that has been treated for mold resistance? I know that stuff was getting popular along the Jersey shore rebuilding from Sandy. I don't remember the name, just that it was red

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Old 10-24-2017, 01:04 AM   #5
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


I paint my OSHA planks on the end grain and for ~5-6" and paint the sides to reduce warping and slow rotting... and it reduces "shrinkage" by other Subs loading up un Branded planks.....

Any one who cut and split firewood knows that painting the end grain reduces splits on the end of framing lumber, Quality studs are always painted/sealed on the ends. One can paint all the ends of a unit of wood in few minutes with a roller brush out of a 5 gallon bucket...

I think painting trusses would pay in the long as to reduce some the stresses imposed by the huge temp differences between the bottom chord buried in 18" of insulation and the top wood fried in the summer and froze in the winter...

JLC had articles about homes sheathed in OSB failing Air change tests due to permeability of the run of the mill Ox boards, Siding having to be removed and the sheathing painted, and then replacing the siding.

Prior to the water resistant OSB floor sheathing products, painting the floor was a real option to save $ on resurfacing the subfloor for most coverings.

I'd suggest painting both sides of roof sheathing to greatly reduce replacement costs if the roof failed above..

Any unfinished garage could use painted undersides/ and backsides of all exposed sheathing to greatly increase the reflected light toward the floor/ workspaces.

I'd spend $ first on non-papered drywall sheathing/fireproofing, floor drains and catchments under clothes and dish washers first....

You would of course avoid coating products that don't breathe at all.

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Old 10-24-2017, 01:05 AM   #6
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


Quote:
Originally Posted by bwiab View Post
Haven't got an official bid, but for an average new house build I'm thinking it would be pretty cheap insurance to prime all structural framing prior to rough ins. If you sprayed them with kilz, would help alleviate some mold concerns down the line and my guess is you could get it done for $1-2k. Any of you already doing this? Or waste of money?

What am I missing here re: law of unintended consequences?

Never done it but I could see spraying the underside of the first floor since that will be visible from the basement.

https://www.menards.com/main/paint/e...8064827&ipos=5
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Old 10-24-2017, 02:02 AM   #7
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


Kill won't prevent mold.

I'd hate to do touch up after plumbing and electrical.
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Old 10-24-2017, 07:30 PM   #8
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Re: Priming Structural Framing For Mold Prevention


I think it would largely be a waste of money. If your process actually runs a risk of mold then figure out where to spend that same money on getting dried-in faster and dehumidify during the plaster/drywall and painting phases if the moisture levels are staying too high, for too long. Both of those will provide a project that is less likely to have mold issues.

Foundation waterproofing is another area where you can typically find ways to reduce the likelihood of mold.

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