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Cutting Existing Tile.

 
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Old 12-22-2005, 09:58 AM   #1
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Cutting Existing Tile.


I have tile going from one room into a another room. The tile comes out about 4 inches too much. I will not be able to find tile to match this so I want to just put in a threshold marble tile there. What I need to do is cut the existing tile back 4 inches. I do not want to take the whole tile out.

What is the best tool to score it with so that when I chissle out the rest the side of the tile I get a clean cut?
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Old 12-22-2005, 10:38 AM   #2
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


I don't think you could score it deeply enough to eliminate any stress on the side of the tile to stay.
I would use a 4 1/2" grinder with dry diamond blade and a steady hand.

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Old 12-22-2005, 01:24 PM   #3
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


I agree, scoring it will not work, you'll have to cut it.
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Old 12-22-2005, 01:35 PM   #4
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Steady Hand being the keyword.
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Old 12-22-2005, 05:22 PM   #5
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Use a 1X piece of straight-edged wood as a 'side-guide'.
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Old 12-22-2005, 08:13 PM   #6
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Also, I use a good shop vac and stick the hose right next to/behind the blade to catch the dust coming off as you cut. It gets most of the dust, saves a lot of clean-up later
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Old 12-22-2005, 10:09 PM   #7
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Agree with all the above! My old Makita grinder w/diamond blade is invaluable - never know when you'll need it...
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Old 12-22-2005, 10:42 PM   #8
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


I've only cut existing tile one time, was widening the hole in the countertop for a stove insert.

I used a CHEAP skillsaw with one of those super cheap abrasive masonry blades. I also did as another poster suggested and hooked up a shopvac and had a helper hold the nozzle right where the most dust was being created.

It was DUSTY.

I draped the work area with plastic tarps.

The above setup worked REALLY well in my particular case. I did not expect it to go so nicely, but it did... I did not crack even ONE tile.

A few observations:

This is Dusty, dirty, ugly. Tarps, shopvacs, etc etc are not gonna stop the dust from getting all over the entire house. Its very fine and very pervasive.

Did I mention the dust?

I went SLOW. It took me an embarasingly long time to cut the entire thing out. I made NUMEROURS small depth changes till I was through the tile and the substrate that it was laid on.

Did I mention the dust?

I wore lung and eye protection that SEALS extremely well. I happened to use a respirator that is asbestos approved and seals very tight to the face. I can not imagine a paint mask being effective.

Did I mention the dust?

The skillsaw I used on this project later developed bearing problems (I expected it would) it is still in use, but it is not the tool it once was.The fine dust produced when doing this project got into the motor and though I cleaned it out really well afterwards and blew it out with an AC the grit has taken its toll in a big way on the saw.

I hope I remembered to mention the dust.

I wore heavy gloves, I occasionally got chunks of crap thrown at me and the cutting areas will get hot. I also occasionally hit metal, either finish nails or other stuff. Those got VERY hot and threw little chunks of red hot metal around.

Did I mention it got a little bit dusty?

There were kickbacks, sometimes the substrate was a bit thicker or perhaps had imperfections in it, sometimes I'd hit a nail. I was glad I 'suited up' and was watching body placement and specifically for kickbacks.

Oh yea and it was dusty.

The above is only an account of my experiences it is NOT advice or suggestion on how to do it on your own.
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Old 12-23-2005, 12:50 AM   #9
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


I once used a rotozip with a tile bit The sink hole was cut out to small and tiled. So it the tile needed a little trimming. That worked real good.
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Old 12-23-2005, 05:56 PM   #10
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Roto-zip usually works good for wall tiles, - - but floor tiles are baked much hotter and are therefore much harder, - - the roto-bit will usually do nothing but 'turn-n-burn'. Real 'counter-top' tiles are as hard as floor tiles, - - but many people do use just a regular wall tile on their countertops, - - much to their dismay if they drop something heavy on them.
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Old 12-23-2005, 09:51 PM   #11
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


right angle grinder and diamond blade + steady hand is the ticket.

In case CGofMP wasn't clear enough, prepare for dust!
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Old 12-24-2005, 02:58 AM   #12
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom R
Roto-zip usually works good for wall tiles, - - but floor tiles are baked much hotter and are therefore much harder, - - the roto-bit will usually do nothing but 'turn-n-burn'. Real 'counter-top' tiles are as hard as floor tiles, - - but many people do use just a regular wall tile on their counter tops, - - much to their dismay if they drop something heavy on them.
This was awhile ago the details are fuzzy. I do remember the tiles being top drawer. I believe I broke a bite trying to cut the tile. Going slow was the key. With the cage around the roto-zip I think it would be a nuisance in tight areas.

Giving it more thought the angle grinder would be the way to go.
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Old 12-24-2005, 11:28 AM   #13
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Another trick to control dust - especially if you are only working on one room or area and it has a operable window, is to close off the room/area with tarps, plastic, etc. Seal up the archways, close the doors, and all the other windows in the area. You don't have to seal it completely tight, you want some openings left for incoming air, preferable across the room form the exhaust fan.

Put a good fan in the one open window blowing out (exhausting) the air and it creates a negative pressure in the room, keeping dust from migrating into the rest of the building. I have a good commercial fan that is mounted to a board that fits in the opening, and I duct tape it in or tack it in with a couple screw/nails, and cover the reamining open areas with cardboard. I have used a 12 dollar box fan before and it works. I do this all the time, especially when drywalling. Keeps 99.5% of the dust out of the rest of the house.

One thing to watch, make sure that any windows around your exhaust fan are closed too, as you could suck some dust back into the house in another room or floor. Also, let the prevailing wind work for you, don't try to exhaust your air directly out the windward side of the building if you can help it, put the fan on the other side or around a corner if possible.
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Old 12-24-2005, 12:56 PM   #14
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Dust???...what dust...I didn't see anything about dust
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Old 12-30-2005, 09:11 PM   #15
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


get a good hammer and tear out all the tile and replace it with new tile
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Old 01-06-2006, 02:01 PM   #16
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kpikul
I have tile going from one room into a another room. The tile comes out about 4 inches too much. I will not be able to find tile to match this so I want to just put in a threshold marble tile there. What I need to do is cut the existing tile back 4 inches. I do not want to take the whole tile out.

What is the best tool to score it with so that when I chissle out the rest the side of the tile I get a clean cut?
I do a lot of this type of work.Patterns, renos, repairs etc.ALL TYPES of 'tile'.
Not to promote a brand(cuz I have yet to get one year out of a roto-zip, but they have a great replacement program!)
Use 2 ml poly over everything, a GOOD shopvac, dustmask is essential.
I use rotozip cuz they are small, easy to handle, variable speed. 3 inch dry continuous rim blade, set at 30,000 rpm, take your time,don't force the tool,and just cutting a doorway will take u 3-4 min. If doorjamb is wood you wont hurt the blade by going into it to COMPLETE THE CUT. If it is a metal framework, then get as close to and then use a Dremmel type tool with a ceramic bit. Go slow and don't force the bit or it WILL break. $15.00 per bit!!!
This method works on any existing tile, marble or glass mosaic. The 3 inch blade allows for some very versatile pattern work. Continuous rim gives a smooth cut.
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Old 02-05-2006, 12:30 AM   #17
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Re: Cutting Existing Tile.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kneel_eh!
Not to promote a brand(cuz I have yet to get one year out of a roto-zip, but they have a great replacement program!)
Wow, I am glad to hear I wasnt the only one with Rotozip problems. I am on my second one and that looks like it is going down fast and it is only 3 months old! I use it mostly for Drywall trimming

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