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Old 02-01-2018, 09:39 AM   #1
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Beams


We built a addition and now the homeowner wants a large pass through opening into the new space. My question is can we run the beam that will carry the second floor joists and hip side of roof all the way to the corner and eliminate the sheathing to not have a small wall projecting into addition or does is still qualify as a structural component and need to maintain a minimum amount of sheathing from the Corner. The addition took off from that corner and extedd the house wall 30.
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Old 02-01-2018, 05:32 PM   #2
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Re: Beams


how wide is the opening going to be?

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Old 02-01-2018, 05:45 PM   #3
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Re: Beams


If you are asking us for permission then I say...go right ahead.

If you are asking if it is doable then I say...yes it is doable.

If you are asking how this new opening will affect the rest of the structure, I say...How do we know?

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Old 02-02-2018, 07:19 AM   #4
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Re: Beams


TimNJ - The width of the wall is 26' with two stories. we would be leaving 4' on one side of the opening and running the beam 21' leaving approx 1' on the other end of wall framed/sheeted. the house is balloon framed and stacked sheeting as well.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:22 AM   #5
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Re: Beams


Thanks Andy for your reply. I know its a vag question and you don't have all the information to answer it thoroughly but just looking for generalized input from situations folks may have encountered.
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Old 02-02-2018, 09:25 AM   #6
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Re: Beams


My point is that you are asking for structural advice on a project that you have not described well enough for anyone to understand. Actually, a description will not do at all. I or another designer would need plans in sufficient detail to show us the whole structure in order to be able to help.
It seems that you are asking about the new shear value of the house since you opened the wall for the addition. How could one analyze that without having greater detail of the house?

That and about $500.00.

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Old 02-05-2018, 06:10 AM   #7
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Re: Beams


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Originally Posted by Ccebuilders View Post
TimNJ - The width of the wall is 26' with two stories. we would be leaving 4' on one side of the opening and running the beam 21' leaving approx 1' on the other end of wall framed/sheeted. the house is balloon framed and stacked sheeting as well.

I wouldn't be surprised an engineer designs the whole thing in steel for that big of an opening and all bearing.
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Old 02-05-2018, 06:39 PM   #8
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Re: Beams


Yeah, that's a large opening with 2nd story & roof load to be doing with an LVL. Way too little info to deal with, but with a double/triple LVL it'd likely be such a tall beam the customer wouldn't have much room to walk under it...unless you really perform surgery and recess it all...again, we have no pictures/drawings to even hypothetically tell you what's do-able...get an engineer!
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Old 02-07-2018, 05:42 AM   #9
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Re: Beams


You need Two very large footing pads, centered under each end of the New Beam, Half of the new additions load,15 ft? x 45 lbs load/sq/ft? plus the old loads of two stories and a roof (and and a basement wall? addition SOG or bearing on old foundation....)

15 x (45 x 3 floors old and new) x 13' of beam =~26325 lbs on one end, a 3 Klbs per sq ft soil capacity, that is 3' square footer under the beam ends. no consideration of roof loads here yet...

2 x 8 stud framing would lessen some of the lack of shear wall issues, and or some post stress tension bracing inside the long straight wall.

You could add a 3 or 4' long shear wall panel to the outside of the building at the party wall line.
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Old 02-07-2018, 11:19 AM   #10
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Re: Beams


If the house is balloon framed you know the foundation would be inadequate to take that concentrated load.

I have only run into one foundation that was poured in an old house (pre 1940's). The rest have either been brick or stones stacked.
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Old 02-07-2018, 02:37 PM   #11
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Re: Beams


Are you working under an inspection requiring permit?

Normally any remodel over~25 % requires the entire structure brought up to code, most people would consider the installation of a 26' foot wide opening alone to be a major project.

A anal inspector might require ALL the balloon framing fire blocking inspected for actually existing, and being installed correctly...

Unless the home has already been underpinned, the legacy foundation is most likely in some state of failure if not rebar re-enforced spread footings were used of adequate size. Thus preventing any type of addition adding loads and or removing load paths, even redundant ones.

Older quality balloon framing(later work might steel straps X-ed in.) would have diagonal "wind" braces cut into the studs at all corner, this would need to be repaired or replace if cut/removed.

You might want to spend a few moments learning how homes stand up for years, especially google the words "Portal braces"
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Old 02-07-2018, 05:28 PM   #12
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Re: Beams


Or, Moment Frame Design.

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