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Old 12-24-2015, 12:25 AM   #1
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Tile Roof


Need help, does anyone know how to check for leaks in tile roofs
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Old 01-03-2016, 03:23 AM   #2
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Re: Tile Roof


Yeah you wait til it rains amd then look up

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Old 01-03-2016, 12:25 PM   #3
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Re: Tile Roof


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Yeah you wait til it rains and then look up
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Old 01-06-2016, 08:33 AM   #4
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Re: Tile Roof


Can you be more specific? Are you noticing yellowing on your ceiling? Are there puddles on your floor? These questions will give you an idea of the size of the problem you want to look for. The best thing to do is trace the issue to a location on your roof, if you start from where you noticed the leak and trace it into the attic then trace it to your decking you COULD have a direct indication of where the problem is, Once you have an idea of the area your issue COULD be at, go onto the roof and check for any inconsistencies such as broken tiles or improperly lapped flashing, lead, etc. Once you have a starting point that is where the fun begins. Remove the tiles to access the underlayment, check again for anything that seems out of place, tears in the underlayment, holes, rust marks on a baton by a screw hole, etc. If you find it great if not keep going. There are many different variables that go into finding and fixing a leak so giving a broad quick fix statement is a bit difficult.
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Old 01-06-2016, 09:14 AM   #5
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Re: Tile Roof


I wish I could post pictures on here. It was an addition on the house that was leaking. The addition had a flat roof. Where the two meet is where the water was getting in. I couldn't find where up top it was coming in so I put flashing down where the two meet and put the tiles back on. I patched some stuff at the top, and hopefully that week fix it.
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Old 01-06-2016, 09:15 AM   #6
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Re: Tile Roof


Before after
Attached Thumbnails
Tile roof-1452093290118.jpg   Tile roof-1452093309037.jpg   Tile roof-1452093327196.jpg  
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Old 01-06-2016, 09:23 AM   #7
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Re: Tile Roof


So, you did the work?
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Old 01-06-2016, 09:41 AM   #8
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Re: Tile Roof


Yes I did, and replaced the flat roof as well
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Old 01-06-2016, 11:59 AM   #9
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Re: Tile Roof


What is under that metal flashing? I see a lot of bumps and waves, all entry points for water. There should be a good quality ice and water shield bridging the two roofs and lapping a at least a foot.
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Old 01-06-2016, 12:57 PM   #10
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Re: Tile Roof


I do know that if you don't know you should not be playing with it.
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Old 01-06-2016, 04:08 PM   #11
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Re: Tile Roof


It's nailed with rubber gasket nails, glued and tarred along the seam.
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Old 01-06-2016, 05:18 PM   #12
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Re: Tile Roof


Quote:
Originally Posted by iori View Post
Yes I did, and replaced the flat roof as well
Do you have any pics of the new flat roof?
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Old 01-06-2016, 07:07 PM   #13
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Re: Tile Roof


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It's nailed with rubber gasket nails, glued and tarred along the seam.
Tar isn't a solution. It will crack over a season or two and start letting water in. Do it right the first time.

Whatever roof membrane or tar paper that's under the clay tile should overlap that metal flashing, if it doesn't, then you have a problem.
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Old 01-07-2016, 07:34 AM   #14
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Re: Tile Roof


The flat roof material should run up the slope a foot or so, then the felt from the sloped roof should over lap 6-12".

Anything held down with rubber washered nails and tar is the seams sounds like a worthy investment.
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Old 01-08-2016, 05:26 AM   #15
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Re: Tile Roof


It's interesting that the "Before" picture shows red tile--- but the " After" picture shows green tile.
I work with this tile a lot--- it looks like Ludowici French tile--- red in the before picture---and what we call dull green in the after picture.
how did the OP manage THAT ?

this would be a pretty ordinary poroject for us.
what we would do is:
1) remove the lower 4 courses or so of tile. sort and stack the tile ,separating tile with damaged water lock from the perfect tile
2) tear off the flat roofing and the abortion around the waste stack. Replace damaged decking
3) typically on a house like this one we would end up installing a 3 ply modified bitumen system like Certainteed Flintlastic on the flat roof.
I would try to lay it out so that the cap sheet runs about 2 feet up the steep slope---but the base sheets run higher up than that.
4) we would cut the original felt in a straight line horizontally across the roof and then slide a piece of new underlayment up under the original felt and out on to the top of the cap sheet to maintain a drainage plane on the original underlayment. Pieces of self adhering base sheet work great for this--- but we also use titanium udl a lot in this instance.
5) prior to the job we would have ( in most cases) pre-fabbed a copper waste stack flashing for this roof. It's easier to do that back in the shop--- but we also do it on site fairly often as well. Our waste stacks cover the entire pipe and then crimp over at the top and return into the top of the cast iron pipe.
6) we would re-lay the tile. we have previously sorted out the pieces with damaged water lock---and THOSE pieces can often be used in the first course. It's not un-usual for 20% or more of the pieces to be un-useable in this situation. We supply matching vintage tile---same color, same manufacture, same patina.
the "unuseable tile" we typically save for OTHER projects where it CAN effectively be used--- for instance cut pieces on the right hand side of a valley--- will often cut out the damaged portion of the water lock

there was also an opportunity here to up sell additional work on the hip caps/stringer on this roof.
also---once the removing the bottom 4 courses of tile are taken into account--- on this roof it may have been easier and faster to simply remove and relay ALL the tile on that slope..........

this is a pretty simple,straightforward, one day job and can be a nice earner. in my opinion the Ludowici French profile is the most durable profile they made/make--- but the bottom few courses have been removed and relaid many times in that houses life---and quite a few of the water locks are apt to be damaged. You won't track down the damaged pieces without removing the tiles.

A project like this is quite typical, so we stock ludowici french in red,dull green, brookville green, also the LWI profile in red, brown, green colors and in several different textures, spanish s tile(13) in new red and old (reclaimed,patinated) , closed shingle in red, dull green, brookville green,English closed shingle in unglazed red, straight mission pans and covers, tapered mission pans and covers, some hawthorne concrete french tiles ,some buckholtz concrete french tiles---- and then misc. trim pieces such as risge cap, hip cap, closed hip starters, circle covers, left hand rake trim, right hand rake trim, eave closure, bird stop , closed valley pieces etc.--- in absolutely as many colors and finishes as we can scrounge up. Most of what we stock is reclaimed from the 1910's through the 1950's---and even so we frequently have to buy from throughout the us to match roofs.

Best wishes all ,
stephen

Stephen
Edit : I forgot to mention--- usually we will put a dadoed cant strip under the first course to hold the first course in the same plane as all the remaining courses---- without that cant strip there is usually a gap between the first course and the second course that leaves the install vulnerable to wind driven rain/snow---- and it looks bad besides. we like to make these out of cedar or white oak strips--- but in my area they were typically originally done in pine----and will have long since rotted out. In order to avoid puncturing the flat roofing material--- in installs like this we will often hang the cant strip from copper wire and then dab it down with a few spots of geocel until the tile itself weights it down.

Last edited by Stephen H; 01-08-2016 at 06:45 AM.
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Old 01-08-2016, 08:41 AM   #16
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Re: Tile Roof


Thanks. The after picture was taken in a different mode on my camera on accident.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:20 AM   #17
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Re: Tile Roof


Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen H View Post
It's interesting that the "Before" picture shows red tile--- but the " After" picture shows green tile.
I work with this tile a lot--- it looks like Ludowici French tile--- red in the before picture---and what we call dull green in the after picture.
how did the OP manage THAT ?

this would be a pretty ordinary poroject for us.
what we would do is:
1) remove the lower 4 courses or so of tile. sort and stack the tile ,separating tile with damaged water lock from the perfect tile
2) tear off the flat roofing and the abortion around the waste stack. Replace damaged decking
3) typically on a house like this one we would end up installing a 3 ply modified bitumen system like Certainteed Flintlastic on the flat roof.
I would try to lay it out so that the cap sheet runs about 2 feet up the steep slope---but the base sheets run higher up than that.
4) we would cut the original felt in a straight line horizontally across the roof and then slide a piece of new underlayment up under the original felt and out on to the top of the cap sheet to maintain a drainage plane on the original underlayment. Pieces of self adhering base sheet work great for this--- but we also use titanium udl a lot in this instance.
5) prior to the job we would have ( in most cases) pre-fabbed a copper waste stack flashing for this roof. It's easier to do that back in the shop--- but we also do it on site fairly often as well. Our waste stacks cover the entire pipe and then crimp over at the top and return into the top of the cast iron pipe.
I like the way you do your vent stack flashing. Can't get better then that.

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