Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources

 
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Old 04-13-2011, 10:32 PM   #1
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Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


I am trying to find an online resource for concrete stilt home construction - specifically the type of construction employed in coastal areas.

This is a long shot, but I was wondering if anyone on here has had any experience working on or building one of these types of structures.








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Old 04-13-2011, 11:49 PM   #2
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Built a couple wood stilt (pilon)homes in south and north Florida not sure if I can help but I can try. What are wondering about?

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Old 04-13-2011, 11:51 PM   #3
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bweikel View Post
Built a couple wood stilt (pilon)homes in south and north Florida not sure if I can help but I can try. What are wondering about?

Reality is only an illusion that occurs due to lack of alcohol.

Has to be concrete - Monroe County as well - very strict.
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Old 04-14-2011, 12:01 AM   #4
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Sorry never built that far south love it down there though.

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Old 04-14-2011, 03:06 AM   #5
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Over here your house and roof must be concrete or no insurance(no loan). There are a few built on stilts here becuase they are in a flood plane. Whats the questions maybe I could ask around for you.

Cheers Jim
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Old 04-14-2011, 11:10 AM   #6
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


What info are you looking for? Are you bidding a project? How far along are the plans? Are the walls CMU or poured in place? What is the roof? Concrete also?

The few I've seen, are damn near 100% concrete. Even the roof system can be poured in place concrete now.
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Old 04-14-2011, 12:42 PM   #7
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


After Katrina, with the 28' storm surge, only concrete structures along the coast that really survived or were capable of being made usable economically were concrete or masonry. The stilt homes on wood piles were gone and for some reason the piles snapped at about 6-7' above ground level. The steel structures were also gone and the twisted/bent piles were left. The concrete piles were tilted a couple of feet and the houses were usually gone.

The surviving homes were concrete or reinforced masonry with very strong rectangular piers (only in the direction perpendicular to the coast or anticipated surge) since the surge is both in AND out. They were on spread footings about 6' deep. Between the piers were masonry "blow-out" walls (6" or 8" unreinforced block non-bearing) perpendicular to the coast that housed the garages, workshops, dens and T.V. rooms. The blow-out walls were important since they were gone when the surge came in and the basic first floor level did not pick up all of the surge load because of the blow-out walls. The upper floors survived and were partially/lightly reinforced concrete masonry and just needed washing and spraying after the carpet was ripped up.

I saw a few new homes being built just after Katrina in a similar manner.
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Old 04-14-2011, 03:50 PM   #8
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Quote:
Originally Posted by ziemer View Post
What info are you looking for? Are you bidding a project? How far along are the plans? Are the walls CMU or poured in place? What is the roof? Concrete also?

The few I've seen, are damn near 100% concrete. Even the roof system can be poured in place concrete now.
I am trying to see what info exists on this type of construction outside of the few contractors in South Florida licensed to build these types of homes. From what I can tell, there is not much out there that relates specifically to concrete stilt homes of the Keys variety (CBS - Concrete Block Stucco).

In the Florida Keys most stilt homes are poured concrete piling with a poured concrete second floor, block exterior walls, and a beefed up truss roof (per the new hurricane codes enacted after 2004). You rarely see poured concrete roofs anymore, as they always fall victim to the climate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
After Katrina, with the 28' storm surge, only concrete structures along the coast that really survived or were capable of being made usable economically were concrete or masonry. The stilt homes on wood piles were gone and for some reason the piles snapped at about 6-7' above ground level. The steel structures were also gone and the twisted/bent piles were left. The concrete piles were tilted a couple of feet and the houses were usually gone.

The surviving homes were concrete or reinforced masonry with very strong rectangular piers (only in the direction perpendicular to the coast or anticipated surge) since the surge is both in AND out. They were on spread footings about 6' deep. Between the piers were masonry "blow-out" walls (6" or 8" unreinforced block non-bearing) perpendicular to the coast that housed the garages, workshops, dens and T.V. rooms. The blow-out walls were important since they were gone when the surge came in and the basic first floor level did not pick up all of the surge load because of the blow-out walls. The upper floors survived and were partially/lightly reinforced concrete masonry and just needed washing and spraying after the carpet was ripped up.

I saw a few new homes being built just after Katrina in a similar manner.
That is exactly how it works in the Keys. In most cases breakaway walls are the only way you can have first floor living quarters. Some homes that were built 6" to a foot lower than others have different flood codes and are ineligible for any type of first floor.




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Last edited by Bomb Dog; 04-14-2011 at 03:53 PM.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:05 PM   #9
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bomb Dog View Post
..... specifically to concrete stilt homes of the Keys variety (CBS - Concrete Block Stucco).....
Pssst!..... You might want to check on that definition.
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Old 04-14-2011, 04:10 PM   #10
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


If you build in the areas that are subject to storms, you can get 40-60% insurance discounts just by doing son simple things like providing anchors for the stronger garage doors and making the gable ends of the roofing system stronger for lateral loads, since openings and wind getting unber the roof leads to the roof damage and also to the personal property damage. The codes do not address this effect because they are prescriptive and easy to administer.

Blow-out walls are great along costs where the general direction of a surge is known and they are great additional bonus shear walls if the surge direction is close to being straight from the planned direction. Otherwise, they just blow out and the rest of the structure acts as it designed to.
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Last edited by concretemasonry; 04-14-2011 at 04:27 PM.
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Old 04-15-2011, 05:32 AM   #11
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Re: Concrete Stilt Home Construction - Online Resources


Quote:
Originally Posted by concretemasonry View Post
If you build in the areas that are subject to storms, you can get 40-60% insurance discounts just by doing son simple things like providing anchors for the stronger garage doors and making the gable ends of the roofing system stronger for lateral loads, since openings and wind getting unber the roof leads to the roof damage and also to the personal property damage. The codes do not address this effect because they are prescriptive and easy to administer.

Blow-out walls are great along costs where the general direction of a surge is known and they are great additional bonus shear walls if the surge direction is close to being straight from the planned direction. Otherwise, they just blow out and the rest of the structure acts as it designed to.
LOL! Yeah we used to get insurance discounts for these storm-prep things down here in South Florida but all the insurance cos. re-negged on the deal and have continued to jack up the rates every year. Ooops! Your roof is older than 10yo so replace it and pay our higher rate or we drop you. Have a nice day! Sincerely, your insurance company.

I guess the one redeeming feature in the keys is that you don't have to go down too far to get to solid limestone for those poured piles.

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