Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-29-2012, 05:21 PM   #1
Preserving the Past
 
Jason Whipple's Avatar
 
Trade: Restoration & Historic Preservation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,571
Rewards Points: 2,060
Send a message via Skype™ to Jason Whipple

Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Gonna try out Sarco Putty for the first time on these windows. I've heard a lot of good stuff about it from other window restoration folks. Had to try it out for myself. This stuff is made in Chicago and is supposed to be superior to the others. I'll let you know what I think after these few windows.

__________________
Jason E Whipple, General Manager
Historic House Restoration, Cincinnati, Ohio
Facebook | Twitter
Jason Whipple is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Jason Whipple For This Useful Post:
Tom Struble (04-25-2012)

Warning: The topics covered on this site include activities in which there exists the potential for serious injury or death. ContractorTalk.com DOES NOT guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained on this site. Always use proper safety precaution and reference reliable outside sources before attempting any construction or remodeling task!

   
 

Old 01-29-2012, 08:28 PM   #2
Pro
 
slowsol's Avatar
 
Trade: Estimator / Preconstruction Manager
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toledo, OH
Posts: 1,577
Rewards Points: 94

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Why is it that ever thread I'm interested in gets half of the text blocked by the stupid ads on the side of the page?

__________________
-John
slowsol is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to slowsol For This Useful Post:
Tom Struble (04-25-2012)
Old 04-24-2012, 10:47 PM   #3
Pro
 
jhark123's Avatar
 
Trade: General Contractor
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Enumclaw, WA
Posts: 1,972
Rewards Points: 538

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


so, how did it go?
__________________
Harkness Construction Enumclaw Contractor Enumclaw Remodeling General Contracting, Finish Carpentry, Framing and Septic Installation in Western Washington Harkness Construction Facebook Page
jhark123 is online now  
Old 04-25-2012, 12:11 AM   #4
Pro
 
VinylHanger's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodel/Glazing
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Oregon
Posts: 3,726
Rewards Points: 3,140

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Yeah, how did it go?
__________________
Your emergency does not constitute a problem with my Constitution.
VinylHanger is online now  
Old 04-28-2012, 04:01 PM   #5
Preserving the Past
 
Jason Whipple's Avatar
 
Trade: Restoration & Historic Preservation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,571
Rewards Points: 2,060
Send a message via Skype™ to Jason Whipple

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Well since there's some interest, the first thing to know is there are 2 types of Sarco putty. One is Sarco dual glaze and the other is Type "M". Dual glaze is for both wood and metal sash and Type "M" is for wood sash only.

My first batch of windows was done with dual glaze. I figured if I was going to buy 2 gallons of it I would get something that would work for everything. This glazing is really oily and sticky to the point that I absolutely hated it. With talking to several other window restoration folks it seemed to be a popular conclusion and I was told to try the type "M" before giving up on Sarco putty.

The next batch of windows I did were done with type "M" and was a much easier putty to use. It tools great and can be painted almost immediately. The dual glaze had to sit for a little over a week before it could be painted.

I will use type "M" from now on. It's way better in my opinion that the DAP product and has a greater life span according to many window restoration experts. The dual glaze is still needed for metal sash because of the extra oils for adhesion but I don't get a big calling for that type of work.

All in all, Sarco putty Type "M" gets a huge thumbs up from me and I'll continue to use it from now on.
__________________
Jason E Whipple, General Manager
Historic House Restoration, Cincinnati, Ohio
Facebook | Twitter
Jason Whipple is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jason Whipple For This Useful Post:
aptpupil (05-29-2012), jhark123 (04-29-2012)
Old 04-29-2012, 12:10 AM   #6
Pro
 
VinylHanger's Avatar
 
Trade: Remodel/Glazing
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Oregon
Posts: 3,726
Rewards Points: 3,140

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Thanks a bunch. I am getting to where I hate the Dap stuff. Too much inconsistency. One tub is great, next tub is all runny, next tub is dry as a bone, which I suppose I prefer to the runny tubs.

I was reading the specs on the "M" putty and it said to only be used in a shop setting? Any idea why? I need it for service work.
__________________
Your emergency does not constitute a problem with my Constitution.
VinylHanger is online now  
Old 04-29-2012, 12:45 AM   #7
Pro
 
jhark123's Avatar
 
Trade: General Contractor
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Enumclaw, WA
Posts: 1,972
Rewards Points: 538

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Quote:
Originally Posted by VinylHanger View Post
Thanks a bunch. I am getting to where I hate the Dap stuff. Too much inconsistency. One tub is great, next tub is all runny, next tub is dry as a bone, which I suppose I prefer to the runny tubs.

I was reading the specs on the "M" putty and it said to only be used in a shop setting? Any idea why? I need it for service work.
I guess it's out for me too.
__________________
Harkness Construction Enumclaw Contractor Enumclaw Remodeling General Contracting, Finish Carpentry, Framing and Septic Installation in Western Washington Harkness Construction Facebook Page
jhark123 is online now  
Old 06-05-2012, 08:09 PM   #8
Registered User
 
CottonFields's Avatar
 
Trade: Old house restoration
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Rural SE Georgia
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Fellas ~ I'm new to this site, and have really enjoyed looking around and seeing what's here. Lots of helpful stuff.

Just looking at Jason's sash pictures makes me almost ashamed to post what I'm about to... But, here it is - I am seriously considering replacing the windows in a current restoration project. I've never before considered such a thing, have always opted to repair, rework, reuse the originals. All the windows in the 1906 house I live in are what I call, brand new, 100 year old windows.

With the house project I'm posting about [1915/? bungalow], I own it as [rental] investment property. I recently removed the front door, brought it home, removed the glass [& glaze], removed all paint, sanded, refinished; then milled pieces to hold the glass in place, rather than glaze, and did the same thing with the one top-light and two side-lights. I detest glazing compound. But I mention this simply to illustrate the time and trouble I've always taken to restore, rather than replace...and here I am saying that I'm thinking about removing the old sashes and replacing them rather than repair them.

They are a horrible mess: Nearly every top sash needs a support piece in the jamb to hold it in place; caulk was used [in gracious amounts] as glaze by previous owner, so you can imagine that atrocity; and only two of ten open, as the others have all been caulked closed. Worse than a horrible mess, huh?

So, I'm weighing the cost of new windows, against the time & trouble [cost] of fixing these, and looking at the benefit of increased energy efficiency.
Will welcome your comments!
CottonFields is offline  
Old 06-05-2012, 09:56 PM   #9
Pro
 
hdrider_chgo's Avatar
 
Trade: Carpenter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 75

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Why don't you post some pictures of the windows?
__________________
"If you only have a hammer, all problems look like nails"


Vintage wood window repair and restoration in Chicago
hdrider_chgo is offline  
Old 06-06-2012, 11:57 AM   #10
Pro
 
hdavis's Avatar
 
Trade: remodeling
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: CoastalME
Posts: 7,334
Rewards Points: 8,692

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Quote:
Originally Posted by CottonFields View Post
Fellas ~ I'm new to this site, and have really enjoyed looking around and seeing what's here. Lots of helpful stuff.

Just looking at Jason's sash pictures makes me almost ashamed to post what I'm about to... But, here it is - I am seriously considering replacing the windows in a current restoration project. I've never before considered such a thing, have always opted to repair, rework, reuse the originals. All the windows in the 1906 house I live in are what I call, brand new, 100 year old windows.

With the house project I'm posting about [1915/? bungalow], I own it as [rental] investment property. I recently removed the front door, brought it home, removed the glass [& glaze], removed all paint, sanded, refinished; then milled pieces to hold the glass in place, rather than glaze, and did the same thing with the one top-light and two side-lights. I detest glazing compound. But I mention this simply to illustrate the time and trouble I've always taken to restore, rather than replace...and here I am saying that I'm thinking about removing the old sashes and replacing them rather than repair them.

They are a horrible mess: Nearly every top sash needs a support piece in the jamb to hold it in place; caulk was used [in gracious amounts] as glaze by previous owner, so you can imagine that atrocity; and only two of ten open, as the others have all been caulked closed. Worse than a horrible mess, huh?

So, I'm weighing the cost of new windows, against the time & trouble [cost] of fixing these, and looking at the benefit of increased energy efficiency.
Will welcome your comments!
Dimensions of the windows come into play. Usually I recommend rebuilding the windows and putting on storm windows to get the energy efficiency. Cheaper up front and cheaper in the long run, even if you hire it out to someone who is good (ignoring having to get custom replacement pieces milled). Also, energy efficiency is typicall better than vinyl with double pane. If you're dealing with double hung, the storm windows I've used don't allow airflow through the top and bottom at the same time - the uppers are frequently caulked shut to cut down on air infiltration, and that unpredictable element - the occupant. Had one where all the double hungs were restored, and the occupant put all the top sashes down and bottom sashes up - then it rained...
hdavis is offline  
Old 06-09-2012, 10:48 AM   #11
Registered User
 
CottonFields's Avatar
 
Trade: Old house restoration
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Rural SE Georgia
Posts: 5
Rewards Points: 10

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


hdavis,

Yes - very helpful reminder to consider storm windows rather than replacements. I do think that's the way to go. Thanks!
CottonFields is offline  
Old 06-09-2012, 11:03 AM   #12
Preserving the Past
 
Jason Whipple's Avatar
 
Trade: Restoration & Historic Preservation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 3,571
Rewards Points: 2,060
Send a message via Skype™ to Jason Whipple

Re: Sarco Putty (glazing Compound)


Quote:
Originally Posted by VinylHanger View Post

I was reading the specs on the "M" putty and it said to only be used in a shop setting? Any idea why? I need it for service work.
My guess would be because it has less oils and more calcium carbonate. The extra oils in dual glaze probably help with bonding in outdoor conditions and the type M will work in a controlled environment. It's certainly what I prefer as most of my work is in the shop and I get a lot more done with type M.

__________________
Jason E Whipple, General Manager
Historic House Restoration, Cincinnati, Ohio
Facebook | Twitter
Jason Whipple is offline  


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Glazing Windows Sprtman Painting & Finish Work 40 06-02-2012 11:03 PM
Latex glazing putty Philly Dude Painting & Finish Work 18 10-16-2011 04:40 PM
matching putty illectric Finish Carpentry 1 06-10-2011 12:23 AM
lightweight setting compound question Mack V Drywall 22 06-24-2010 03:58 AM
joint compound under carpet for gaps. mechanix General Discussion 3 12-10-2008 03:49 PM

Join Now... It's Fast and FREE!

I am a professional contractor
I am a DIY Homeowner
Drywall Talk is for
PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTORS ONLY!

At DrywallTalk.com we cater exlusivly to professional contractors who make their living as a contractor. Knowing that many homeowners and DIYers are looking for a community to call home, we've created www.DIYChatroom.com DIY Chatroom is full of helpful advices and perfect for DIY homeowners.

Redirecing in 10 seconds
No Thanks
terms of service

Already Have an Account?